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2
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2answers
233 views

What are global and local gauge invariance defined as they are?

I'm sorry for the triviality of my questions. Why is $\bar{\psi} = e^{i \theta}\bar{\psi}$, where $\theta$ is a real number, used as the global gauge transformation? Why $e^{i \theta}$; what's the ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

A question on Gauge fields [duplicate]

Gauge fields play an important role in describing forces. It is very important in Lagrangian mechanics to derive the laws of motion of different systems. The laws of motion doesn't depend on gauge ...
3
votes
2answers
209 views

Time dependent Hamiltonian and Gauge invariance

In general, in quantum mechanics we can prove probability current or the Schrodinger equation and other quantities are gauge invariant. However, the Hamiltonian isn't gauge invariant. Under a gauge ...
1
vote
0answers
91 views

Argument of E. Fradkin on the mean-field theory of spin liquids

I have read the chapter 8 of Field Theory of Condensed Matter Physics (2ed.) by E. Fradkin a couple of times, but I still confused by his argument at some points. I hope you can help me with that. ...
1
vote
2answers
121 views

Gauge transformation of Lagrangian

Suppose I have a Lagrangian density $\mathcal{L}(\phi^\mu,\sigma)$ depending on vector fields $\phi^\mu$ and their derivatives and a scalar field $\sigma$ and its derivatives. If I make a gauge ...
4
votes
1answer
137 views

Why is tree-level interaction between neutral scalar and photons non-renormalizable?

I've read that the decay of a neutral scalar particle into two photons, i.e., $$ S(p+q) \to \gamma(p) + \gamma(q) $$ can't happen via tree diagrams and instead is caused by loop diagrams (such as a ...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

Does a Static E-field Increase the Gauge Invariant Vector Potential Without Bound?

The gauge invariant formulation of Maxwell's Laws (7.13): Indicates that the transverse electric field is the time derivative of the transverse vector potential. This gauge invariant vector ...
2
votes
1answer
150 views

Question on boundary condition for Maxwell's Equations and Coulomb's law

When deriving Coulomb's law using the differential forms of Maxwell's equation, the boundary condition that $\phi = 0 $ at infinity is also used. From $\nabla × E = 0, E = \nabla \phi$ for some ...
5
votes
2answers
360 views

Electric current $j^{\mu}$ in standard QED vs. scalar QED

The expression for the 4-current $j^{\mu}$ in standard QED is $$ e\bar{\Psi}\gamma^\mu\Psi $$ and $$ \frac{e}{2 i}(\psi^\dagger D^\mu \psi - (D^\mu \psi)^\dagger \psi) $$ in scalar QED. I ...
4
votes
1answer
138 views

Gauge invariance (QED)

In his book, the author says that according to the Feynman diagrams of this process in QED $$e^+ e^- \rightarrow \gamma \gamma,$$ gauge invariance requires that $$k_{1\nu}(A^{\mu\nu} + ...
0
votes
0answers
52 views

Gauge invariance and non-commuting second derivatives

I'm currently doing a homework assignment in relativistic quantum mechanics, and one of the problems involves proving the gauge invariance of a particular lagrangian. The problem is really quite ...
1
vote
2answers
66 views

Is a constant transformation still considered a gauge transformation?

I've never even considered the possibility that a constant transformation would not qualify as a gauge transformation. But I'm reading a paper that seems to make exactly this distinction. In ...
3
votes
0answers
73 views

Why are gauge symmetries continuous?

All gauge theories that are considered in literature are continuous $SU(N)$ symmetric. My question is why are always continuous groups considered for gauge symmetries? Why don't we consider discrete ...
4
votes
2answers
235 views

Wess-Zumino Gauge in non-Abelian supersymmetric theory

I've got a question concerning non-Abelian supersymmetric gauge theories. Consider supersymmetric non-Abelian theory realized on chiral superfields $\Phi_i$ in a representation $R$ with matrix ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

In what sense are photons emergent?

Recently I read in an essay by Wilczek: "Photons are mixtures of weak B3 and hypercharge C mesons. It is those objects, not the emergent photon, whose properties are ideally simple." Until now I ...
1
vote
0answers
124 views

How can gauge invariance be unphysical?

Gauge symmetry is said to be "unphysical" because the transformations - unlike changes of reference frame - do not correspond to real physical operations. But the consequences of gauge symmetries are ...
2
votes
1answer
63 views

In which contexts are gauge theories applied?

According to the book Quantum Field Theory for the Gifted Amateur, on page 128 they say A theory which had a field $A^\mu(x)$ introduced to produce an invariance with respect to local ...
1
vote
1answer
262 views

Free electromagnetic field in Lorenz gauge

To get rid of the extra term in the QED Lagrangian we need to redefine the electromagnetic four-vector: $A^{\mu} \rightarrow A^{\mu} - \frac{1}{c} \partial_{\mu} a(x)$ where $a(x)$ is the function ...
3
votes
2answers
249 views

Classical EM : clear link between gauge symmetry and charge conservation

In the case of classical field theory, Noether's theorem ensures that for a given action $$S=\int \mathrm{d}^dx\,\mathcal{L}(\phi_\mu,\partial_\nu\phi_\mu,x^i)$$ that stays invariant under the ...
3
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0answers
75 views

Gauge invariance of Fermi's golden rule

I am having some issues with gauge invariance of Fermi's golden rule. Say we have a system Hamiltonian for a particle in an electric field and some additional potential $V$ with ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

How one can know the gauge field emerging from the local gauge invariance is actually the EM field? [closed]

How one can know the gauge field emerging from the local gauge invariance is actually the EM field? I understood in a simple scalar field whose Lagrangian is given by $ \mathcal{L} = ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

Understanding better this physical phrase [duplicate]

In field theory, symmetry governs the dynamics by restricting the form of the Lagrangian from which all relevant equations and interactions are derived. An example of symmetry transformations is ...
2
votes
0answers
144 views

Is global gauge symmetry really a symmetry and local conserved current in gauge theories?

One way to define a gauge theory is that whenever the Lagrangian is invariant under some local transformations, we say these local transformations are local gauge transformations and the theory is a ...
0
votes
1answer
121 views

Higher-order gauge coupling terms in the Lagrangian

In QFT, one works with Lagrangians that are invariant with respect to a certain symmetry. Out of this invariance, one is able to write down interaction terms at first order in the gauge couplings. The ...
2
votes
0answers
142 views

Symmetry, gauge, and projective symmetry group (PSG)?

My following questions come from the understanding of the relations between the PSGs for two gauge-equivalent mean-field (MF) Hamiltonians (or MF ansatz). Considering the Schwinger-fermion ...
2
votes
1answer
96 views

Introduction of the vector potential $A_{\mu}$ for the local gauge invariance of the complex scalar field lagrangian [duplicate]

In Ryder, when trying to restore the local $U(1)$ gauge symmetry of the complex scalar field $\phi=\phi_1+i\phi_2$, the final Lagrangian consists of the following four parts: ...
1
vote
1answer
137 views

Regularization of infrared divergences

Let's have diagrams in QED when we don't use Feynman gauge. Then the bare photon propagator will look like $$ \tag 1 D_{\mu \nu}(p) = -\frac{g_{\mu \nu} - \frac{p_{\mu}p_{\nu}}{p^{2}}}{p^{2} + ...
4
votes
3answers
139 views

Spontaneous symmetry breaking to subspace not giving massless bosons

I'm currently trying to understand spontaneously broken in general and have stumbled upon a weird result which doesn't seem to correspond to my knowledge about broken gauge symmetries. Suppose we ...
3
votes
1answer
68 views

How is $\varepsilon_+^\mu(p) = \bar{v}(k) \gamma^\mu u(p)$ derived?

The relation $$\varepsilon_+^\mu(p) = \bar{v}(k) \gamma^\mu u(p)$$ is sometimes used to ease calculations of Feynman amplitudes with external gluons (see for example here at (2.13)). Where does this ...
5
votes
2answers
247 views

Is internal symmetry the same as gauge symmetry?

This is more a terminology question. I have seen that some people differentiate between the two types of symmetry: internal symmetry and gauge symmetry (of a field theory). Is there a difference (in ...
2
votes
1answer
241 views

Are the Yang-Mills equation and its generalization gauge invariant?

I have derived the Yang-Mills equation and its generalization coupled to a current of a scalar field $\phi$ by extremalizing the action describing a $\mathrm{SU}(2)$ scalar field gauge theory: ...
1
vote
1answer
185 views

Railguns and Gauge Invariance

Paul J. Cote and Mark A. Johnson of Benet Laboratories, Army Research, Engineering and Development Command wrote a series of short papers on the vector potential arising from their attempts to solve ...
1
vote
1answer
252 views

Why this integral is equal to zero?

Recently I have read that for gauge-invariant functional (under transformations of some $SU(n)$ group) $R(A) = R(F_{\mu \nu}^{a})$ contains only gauge field $A_{\mu}^{a}$ satisfies the identity $$ ...
4
votes
1answer
131 views

Only transverse photons are gauge-invariant (Peskin page 298)

Seven lines down from the top of page 298 of P & S, it says "Single particle states containing one electron, one positron, or one transversely polarized photon are gauge-invariant, while states ...
1
vote
2answers
115 views

What is the reason for the $ i \tau_2 $ - factor in the higgs coupling with up-type quarks?

The quark mass term in the Standard Model Lagrangian looks like this: $$ L = - \lambda_d \bar{Q}\phi d_R - \lambda_u \bar{Q} i \tau_2 \phi^* u_R $$ What is the reason for the $ i \tau_2 $ - ...
2
votes
0answers
46 views

Massive photon and gauge invariance of S-matrix amplitude

Let's have minimally extended gauge invariant lagrangian (with free kinetic term of EM field): $$ \tag 1 L (\Psi , \partial_{\mu} \Psi) \to L (\Psi , D_{\mu}\Psi ) - \frac{1}{4}F^{\mu \nu}F_{\mu \nu}, ...
2
votes
0answers
66 views

Momentum operator of a particle in an electromagnetic field

In quantum mechanics, to all observables correspond some self-adjoint operators. In the absence of an electromagnetic field the momentum operator is clearly $\vec{P}:=\frac{\hbar}{i}\vec{\nabla}$. ...
5
votes
1answer
152 views

Is gauge connection unique?

In QFT, given a gauge group and matter field, is the form of the gauge field unique? In other words, given a principal G-bundle and its associated vector bundle, is the construction of the principle ...
2
votes
1answer
139 views

Mass term in the Lagrangian

I have read that the mass term appearing in the electroweak Lagrangian stops it (the Lagrangian) from becoming gauge invariance. Can someone explain where and why this term is creating the problem?
3
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0answers
94 views

The Ward identity for EM amplitude with massive vector boson

Let's have theory of massive vector boson interacting with EM field: $$ L = |D_{\mu}W_{\nu} - D_{\nu}W_{\mu}|^{2} + m^{2}|W|^{2}, \quad D_{\mu} = \partial_{\mu} - ieA_{\mu}. $$ The question: how to ...
7
votes
3answers
624 views

What is the basis of gauge theory?

I’m learning about gauge concepts. I’ve always had the idea that by looking at a phenomenon from different viewpoints, that symmetries could be derived – in fact, that was what an equal sign ...
3
votes
1answer
127 views

Yang-Mills Lagrangian invariant under BRST

In equation 16.47 in Peskin & Schroeder, it is claimed that $$ -\frac{1}{2}g^2f^{abc}f^{cde}\left(A_{\mu}\,^{b}c^{d}c^{e}+A_{\mu}\,^{d}c^{e}c^{b}+A_{\mu}\,^{e}c^{b}c^{d}\right) ~=~ 0 \tag{16.47}$$ ...
4
votes
0answers
241 views

Gauge Invariance of Yang Mills Lagrangian

I am trying to show the invariance of the following Yang Mills Lagrangian: $$L= -\frac{1}{4} F^a_{\mu \nu} F_a^{\mu\nu} + J_a^\mu A_\mu^a$$ under the following gauge transformation ($\theta$ being a ...
4
votes
0answers
304 views

Gauge Invariance of the Non-abelian Chern-Simons Term

I'm trying to prove that, under the gauge transformation $$A_{\mu} \rightarrow A_{\mu}^{\prime} = g^{-1} A_{\mu} g + g^{-1} \partial_{\mu} g,$$ the non-abelian Chern-Simons Lagrangian density: ...
8
votes
0answers
169 views

Faddeev Popov Gauge Fixing in Electromagnetism

Reading section 9.4 in Peskin, I am wondering about the following: The functional integral on $A_{\mu}$ diverges for pure-gauge configurations, because for those configurations, the action is zero. ...
13
votes
2answers
928 views

Are there massless bosons at scales above electroweak scale?

Spontaneous electroweak symmetry breaking (i.e. $SU(2)\times U(1)\to U(1)_{em}$ ) is at scale about 100 Gev. So, for Higgs mechanism, gauge bosons $Z$ & $W$ have masses about 100 GeV. But before ...
15
votes
2answers
858 views

Noether's theorem and gauge symmetry

I'm confused about Noether's theorem applied to gauge symmetry. Say we have $$\mathcal L=-\frac14F_{ab}F^{ab}.$$ Then it's invariant under $A_a\rightarrow A_a+\partial_a\Lambda.$ But can I say that ...
0
votes
1answer
239 views

Klein-Gordon, gauge transformation [closed]

It must be really simple, but I cannot get why can we add an $i e \frac{\partial \Lambda}{\partial x}$ in the second row below. The propagation of a charged scalar particle, along the x-axis and in ...
6
votes
2answers
319 views

When can we add a total time derivative of $f(q, \dot{q}, t)$ to a Lagrangian?

The other day, I was listening to this lecture on the Lagrangian for a charged particle in an electromagnetic field, and at one point in the video, the lecturer mentions that we can add any total time ...
3
votes
2answers
135 views

Gauge symmetry for p-forms

It is well known that the Lorentz invariance of the S-matrix implies gauge redundancy for 1-forms or 'photons'. Does this argument go through to $p$-forms? That is, does Lorentz invariance of the ...