0
votes
1answer
66 views

In space I am moving wrt to what?

Let us suppose I am running on a street. When my eyes are open, I can see many things moving backward, and thus it gives me an idea that I am moving wrt those things. Not even this, even if I close my ...
4
votes
1answer
209 views

Galilean invariance of a subset of Maxwell equations

I read in Feynman's proof of Maxwell equations the statement that the subset of Maxwell equations comming from the Bianchi identity: $$ \nabla \cdot {\bf B} = 0, \quad \nabla \times {\bf E} + ...
3
votes
1answer
151 views

Newton's second law invariant under law of addition of velocities

I'm currently reading Schutz' first course in general relativity, and on the second page (already) I've encountered a problem: We have the Galilean law of addition of velocities: $ v(t) = v'(t) = ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Lorentz and Galilean transformation

I read about Lorentz and Galilean transformation in a book of modern physics some days back, but couldn't clearly understand the difference between the two? Also it was stated there that maxwell's ...
1
vote
2answers
176 views

Velocity of an object undergoing homogenous acceleration

So I was considering the following problem within the context of Special Relativity: Given an object O, with initial velocity v, undergoing constant acceleration at a rate of a, I want to express the ...
3
votes
1answer
218 views

Faraday's Law and Galilean Invariance

In Jackson's text he says that Faraday law is actually: $$ \oint_{\partial \Sigma} \mathbf{E} \cdot \mathrm{d}\boldsymbol{\ell} = -k\iint_{\Sigma} \frac{\partial \mathbf B}{\partial t} \cdot ...
6
votes
2answers
242 views

Why absoluteness of time implies galilean transformations?

In Landau course, vol.1 Mechanics, one finds the statement: ...the absoluteness of time necessarily implies that the ordinary law of composition of velocities is applicable to all phenomena. I ...