Frequency is the rate of repetitive aspect in the amplitude over a given dimension.

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7answers
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How can a black hole produce sound?

I was reading this article from NASA -- it's NASA -- and literally found myself perplexed. The article describes the discovery that black holes emit a "note" that has physical ramifications on the ...
68
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6answers
10k views

Why does public mains power use 50-60 Hz and 100-240 V?

Is there a physical reason behind the frequency and voltage in the mains electricity? I do not want to know why exactly a certain value was chosen; I am rather interested to know why that range/order ...
65
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8answers
80k views

Why does a remote car key work when held to your head/body?

I was trying to unlock my car with a keyfob, but I was out of range. A friend of mine said that I have to hold the transmitter next to my head. It worked, so I tried the following later that day: ...
38
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7answers
5k views

Why is it so easy to create audible sound?

Context Why is it so easy to create audible sounds in life with basically anything? Putting your cup of coffee on a table comes with a sound Turning a page of your book comes with a sound Even ...
33
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7answers
7k views

Why can't you hear music well over a telephone line?

Why can't you hear music well well over a telephone line? I was asked this question in an interview for a university study placement and I unfortunately had no idea. I was given the hint that the ...
33
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4answers
54k views

Do low frequency sounds really carry longer distances?

It is a common belief that low frequencies travel longer distances. Indeed, the bass is really what you hear when the neighbor plays his HiFi loud (Woom Woom). Try asking people around, a lot of them ...
31
votes
4answers
8k views

Why do prisms work (why is refraction frequency dependent)?

It is well known that a prism can "split light" by separating different frequencies of light: Many sources state that the reason this happens is that the index of refraction is different for ...
30
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3answers
2k views

Is there any truth to interpreting definition of a second as corresponding to oscillations?

As far as I understand the definition of a second, the Cs-133 atom has two hyperfine ground states (which I don't really understand what they are but it's not really important), with a specific energy ...
28
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10answers
32k views

What determines color — wavelength or frequency?

What determines the color of light -- is it the wavelength of the light or the frequency? (i.e. If you put light through a medium other than air, in order to keep its color the same, which one would ...
19
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5answers
15k views

Why does medium not affect the frequency of sound?

I read in various places that frequency does not change with medium. Instead, wavelength changes in different mediums due to a change in speed. I understand why speed changes with medium, but I'm not ...
17
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3answers
23k views

What is the highest possible frequency for an EM wave?

What is the highest possible frequency, shortest wavelength, for an electromagnetic wave in free space, and what limits it? Is the answer different for EM waves in other materials or circumstances? ...
17
votes
6answers
15k views

Why do bass tones travel through walls?

I was in the shower while my roommate was listening to music and got to thinking about the fact that I could only hear the bass and lower drums through the walls. Why is this? The two possibilities I ...
16
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5answers
44k views

Why doesn't the frequency of light change during refraction?

When light passes from one medium to another its velocity and wavelength change. Why doesn't frequency change in this phenomenon?
16
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2answers
4k views

Why can't the human voice produce a Shepard tone?

Audio of a shepard tone on youtube. So what is a Shepard tone? A Shepard tone, named after Roger Shepard, is a sound consisting of a superposition of sine waves separated by octaves. When ...
14
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4answers
2k views

Is the frequency of light restricted?

What are the factors that limit the frequency of light? Can it have wavelengths ranging between zero and infinity?
12
votes
3answers
100k views

Why does wavelength change as light enters a different medium?

When light waves enter a medium of higher refractive index than the previous, why is it that: Its wavelength decreases? The frequency of it has to stay the same?
12
votes
3answers
703 views

What are the rules for breaking a glass with your voice?

So, this morning I woke up and remembered something I discussed about with one of my friends: Can human voice really break a wine glass? So I looked it up and after checking many websites and ...
12
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3answers
43k views

How does load affect frequency on the power grid?

This story about the use of battery/freewheel based Frequency Regulators confused me about how the 60hz frequency of the North American power grid was set--saying that it was kept at that frequency by ...
9
votes
1answer
2k views

Why do you only hear the bass when someone nearby is wearing earphones?

When someone nearby is listening to music through earphones or headphones, usually you can only hear the bass (unless it's really loud where you can hear the singer's voice and the other instruments ...
9
votes
3answers
887 views

How is a human voice unique? [closed]

Well, I am quite new to concepts of vocal sounds. From the physics point of view I believe a sound has two basic parameters i.e, frequency and amplitude. Considering the end sound wave produced by ...
9
votes
4answers
18k views

How does power consumption vary with the processor frequency in a typical computer?

I am looking for an estimate on the relationship between the rate of increase of power usage as the frequency of the processor is increased. Any references to findings on this would be helpful.
9
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3answers
554 views

Historical analysis of light interference - difference frequencies

It is well-known that light of two different frequencies illuminating a detector will produce an output with a component at the difference frequency. While such considerations are eminently useful (...
9
votes
3answers
18k views

Does the human body have a resonant frequency? If so, how strong is it?

Inspired by this question on Music beta SE, I'm wondering if the human body has a strong resonant frequency. I guess the fact that it's largely a bag of jelly would add a lot of damping to the system, ...
9
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1answer
1k views

Are small speakers inherently limited to higher frequencies?

I am hoping to build a subwoofer using multiple smaller speakers (165mm) instead of a single larger speaker (380mm). My theory is that the displaced air volume is what matters, not the individual ...
9
votes
3answers
804 views

Is there physics behind the layout of a piano keyboard?

We have 12 different 'notes' per octave on a musical keyboard. They are set up so that every 'note' (A, B,C etc) is a second harmonic of the same 'note' in the next higher octave. With this ratio in ...
8
votes
4answers
43k views

What makes some laser beams visible and other laser beams invisible?

What makes the beam of some lasers: visible? such as the ones used in clubs or such as the laser pointers sold at amazon which if pointed to the sky look like a solid visible beam of light ...
8
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3answers
2k views

Gravitational waves frequency

When people quote the discovery of gravitational waves no reference seems to be made to the frequency, presumably this is about the current state of detectors. Or are the frequencies detected the ...
8
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6answers
25k views

Is all kind of light same speed?

Is there any speed difference between blue or red light? Is there ever a speed difference? Or does all types of light move at the same speed?
8
votes
2answers
11k views

How do you calculate vortex shedding frequency?

I am attempting to try to find out if there is any effect of Von Karman vortices on a group of wind speed readings where it is presumed that due to a mountain nearby the data collection spot Von ...
8
votes
2answers
413 views

Do virtual photons have a frequency?

Real photons do have frequencies, which is directly related to its energy. So, can virtual photons that take part in EM interactions have frequencies too? When my hand is pressed up against a glass ...
8
votes
2answers
506 views

How is extremely low frequency (ELF) radiation collected by a submarine antenna?

The U.S. Navy Project ELF managed to generate extremely low frequency (ELF) radiation at down to $\approx 76$ Hz (implying a wavelength of $\approx 3,945$ km!). I was curious, what kind of receiving ...
7
votes
6answers
15k views

How many colors exist?

How many "colors" do exist? Our perception: As far as I know, colors are just different frequencies of light. According to wikipedia, we can see wavelengths from about 380 nm und 740 nm. This means ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Can we transport energy over infinite distances through vacuum using light?

I know that light (or electromagnetic radiation in general) attenuates in intensity as the square of the distance it travels. Why does it attenuate? Are the photons being scattered by the medium ...
7
votes
4answers
3k views

Is speed of sound really constant?

Does not speed of sound actually depend on the frequency and/or amplitude of the waves? If so, why it is constant?
7
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5answers
2k views

Why do harmonics occur when you pluck a string?

When you energise a taut string, the following resonant modes of vibration occur: Plotting on the frequency domain, you can see their corresponding frequencies: But what is the underlying ...
7
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2answers
3k views

How can a Human voice or animal voice have unique frequency

Well this is pretty noobish question and I am not sure how to ask. When We talk we don't talk in an uniform frequency. Then how can one measure frequency of ones sound/voice ? I am asking this cause ...
7
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2answers
3k views

How can a Photon have a “frequency”?

I picture light ray as a composition of photons with an energy equal to the frequency of the light ray according to $E=hf$. Is this the good way to picture this? Although I can solve elementary ...
7
votes
4answers
252 views

How do electromagnetic waves carry energy?

Its said that electromagnetic waves carry energy. Is this because these waves are made up of electric and magnetic fields which can cause changes to the stuff that falls with in their range? Is that ...
6
votes
2answers
848 views

Why is the rotation period finite for nonrotating object?

This question is conceptual in nature as I am obviously failing to grasp something simple here. Say you have a rotating astronomical object (say a pulsar) with rotation period T. The rotation rate is ...
6
votes
1answer
842 views

Test whether a glass prevents you from getting your Vitamin D portion?

I work in an office with glass, which I believe filters the UV radiation of the sunlight. Is it possible to test if exposure to the light coming through the glass will supply Vitamin D for me as a ...
6
votes
2answers
215 views

Multiple channels of information in single electromagnetic wave?

I'm trying to understand how can multiple radio stations transmit information just by transmitting using different frequency. The way I understand it all those different frequency waves add up to a ...
6
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6answers
9k views

How to Make RF Waves Visible

I understand RF (Radio Frequency) Waves are electromagnetic waves and a mode of communication for wireless technologies, such as cordless phones, radar, ham radio, GPS, and television broadcasts. Most ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Does a domestic microwave work by emitting an electromagnetic wave at the same frequency as a OH bond in water?

I was told once that microwaves work by exciting water molecules in food. Also that this worked because the frequency in the microwave was the same as that in the bond between Oxygen and Hydrogen in ...
6
votes
1answer
231 views

Frequency shift without affecting signal length

Non-physicist here. From what I've learned in university and what common sense says, a shift in frequency of a signal results in a change in its length in time. For example, if a sinusoid signal of ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

What is the specific meaning of “Fourier frequency” (as opposed to simply “frequency”)?

I've noticed that many journal articles (in optics) use the phrase "Fourier frequency" to describe, well, the frequency of something. Google scholar search for "Fourier frequency". Example: ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Frequency of touch, taste, and scent [closed]

So I was thinking about sound - and how anything below 20Hz is basically inaudible to humans (because it is too low of a frequency to be recognized), as well as anything above around 20KHz (because it ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Why does a glass breaks when subject to very sharp sound like in opera?

I have seen in Ripleys believe it or not that an opera singer generates a very high frequency of sound and breaks a glass window.How do they do it?
5
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2answers
2k views

why is a resistor frequency independent

I had a doubt that why is a resistor, frequency independent? Since, as frequency increases the movement of electrons increases so heat increases which causes change in resistance. So my question is ...
5
votes
2answers
664 views

How does the frequency of a particle manifest itself?

In terms of wave-particle duality for, let's say a photon; how would the frequency practically manifest/demonstrate itself? Like, i understand that the frequency is related to the energy a particle ...
5
votes
6answers
12k views

Limit of human eye flicker perception?

I am designing a LED dimmer using software-controlled Pulse Width Modulation, and want to know the minimum PWM frequency that I must reach to make that LED dimming method indistinguishable from ...