A unitary linear operator which resolves a function on $\mathbb{R}^N$ into a linear superposition of "plane wave functions". Most often used in physics for calcalating the response of a time shift invariant linear system as the sum of its response to time harmonic excitation or for transforming a ...

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22 views

What is this called in a Fourier transform spectrum?

For a signal with length $T$ and a sampling rate $f_s$, the Fourier transform will create a spectrum that has a bandwidth $\frac{1}{2f_s}$. The smallest frequency bin of the signal will be $\Delta ...
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18 views

Frequency response of a dynamical system under band and time limited input

Assume that I force the following dynamical system $$ \begin{align} \dot{\boldsymbol{x}} &= \boldsymbol{f}(\boldsymbol{x},u), \\ y &= g(\boldsymbol{x},u), \\ \boldsymbol{x}(t_0) &= ...
3
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1answer
83 views

Poles for a particle scattered in a delta potential

I am working on problem a professor gave me to get an idea for the research he does, and have hit a point where I'm having a difficult time seeing where I need to go from where I'm at. I would also ...
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2answers
64 views

How is the integrand concluded to be identically zero?

In expanding the classical Klein-Gordon field in Fourier space to write it in terms of $\phi(\mathbf{p})$ instead of $\phi(\mathbf{x})$, I reached the following result. $$\int ...
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1answer
118 views

Initial condition for Fourier transformed Schrödinger equation

I asked in this thread Time-dependet Schrödinger equation how to solve the Time-dependent Schrödinger equation. One of JamalS' recommendations was the Fourier transform, which is why I want to quote ...
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1answer
32 views

Effective masses for different direction

Assume we have an indirect semiconductor where the effective mass becomes anisotropic in different directions. Usually, one talks about a mass in parallel and perpendicular direction referring to ...
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1answer
80 views

Why does $\nabla \to ik$ when you Fourier transform?

I am reading a text that describes the scattering of light by a particle with dielectric constant $\epsilon$ After a bit of maths starting from Maxwell's equations they obtain: $$\nabla (\nabla ...
2
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2answers
66 views

Modeling the free space propagation of laser beams using Fourier transforms

I am trying to model the propagation of a laser beam in free space. I have an initial field $E_{in}(x,z=0)$ (a Gaussian beam) and need to find the fields at other points on the optical axis $E(x,z=d)$ ...
2
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1answer
62 views

Far Field Diffraction of EM waves: what does the zero frequency signify?

If you have a system of independently radiating electrons/point-charges, the far field distribution of the EM waves can be approximated by the fraunhoffer diffraction integral, or simply by the ...
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3answers
161 views

The Dirac-Delta function as an initial state for the quantum free particle

I want to ask if it is reasonable that I use the Dirac-Delta function as an intial state ($\Psi (x,0) $) for the free particle wavefunction and interpret it such that I say that the particle is ...
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1answer
67 views

Resolution in a Fourier transform spectroscopy setup

I am a bachelor physics student and as an assignment we had to perform measurements on an FT spectroscopy setup. Context. Our setup consisted of a Michelson interferometer through which the light ...
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0answers
41 views

What excactly is a “fourier component of a density fluctuation”?

Light scattering texts say depending on the scattering angle, you are seeing a certain fourier component of a density fluctuation. This density fluctuation varies sinusoidally due to Brownian motion ...
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4 views

Verification of Fourier transformationn of Io-sinh function [migrated]

I try to match. What could not match $I_o-\sinh$ pair developed by Ben Logan, transform pair also published in The Practical Application of the Fourier Integral Campbell, George A .Sir J.F. Kaiser ...
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18 views

Question on envelope-carrier description of traveling wave

I'm doing a research internship in attosecond physics right now, and one of the really important things in the field is the description of a propagating laser pulse as the combination of a slowly (or ...
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2answers
34 views

Peak at zero in one device and not the other

I was wondering if anyone could shed some light on this problem. I have placed two accelerometers on an animal one sampling at 50 Hz the other at 100 Hz. They were placed in the same position. I then ...
3
votes
5answers
3k views

Why are AC quantities represented by sine waves always?

Usually we use a sinusoidal wave form to represent a alternating quantity. Why not a cosinusoidal wave or a ramp wave form? In sine wave forms we can indicate the maximum and minimum amplitude and ...
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0answers
247 views

Fourier Transform of Poisson Equation [migrated]

While trying to solve the Poisson Equation by using Green's Function I have to Fourier transform the equation i.e $$-\nabla^{2}\phi(r)=\rho(r).$$ In the book after Fourier transform, the solution ...
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1answer
84 views

Fourier expansion of the Klein-Gordon field

Is there a reason(both physical and mathematical) why the Klein-Gordon field is represented as a fourier expansion in the second quantization as opposed to other mathematical expansions? Be gentle ...
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1answer
78 views

Solution to Klein-Gordon equation

I have a sound grounding on ODE's, not that much on PDE's, i've read many books on QFT and most if not all come to the conclusion that the solution to the Klein-Gordon equation ...
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1answer
83 views

String Theory and Fourier Analysis [closed]

Me and my friend, both many years from learning string theory, had a recent debate about it anyway. He said he already partially discounts it because after learning waves, he believes any function, ...
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0answers
56 views

Why do books write $X(f)$ when they mean actually mean $\lvert X(f)\rvert$?

All books write $X(f)$ in plots - the Fourier transform of $x(t)$ - when they actually mean $\lvert X(f)\rvert$, without even mentioning in passing that they are dropping the mod sign. And also they ...
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3answers
81 views

Units of a discrete Fourier transform

Normally a Fourier transform (FT) of a function of one variable is defined as $$f_k=\int^\infty_{-\infty}f(x)\exp\left(-2\pi i k x\right) dx.$$ This means that $f_k$ gets the units of $f$ times the ...
3
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1answer
92 views

Plane wave complex notation

As far as I know, the function: $$ \vec{E}(\vec{r},t)=\vec{E_0}\cdot e^{i(\vec{k}\cdot \vec{r}-\omega t)} \hspace{2cm}(1) $$ is a mathematical solution of the wave equation: $$ \nabla^2 ...
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2answers
108 views

Simplest derivation of Fourier transform for periodic functions (in crystal lattice)?

What is the simplest derivation of the following two well-known formulas that work for crystal lattice [1]: $$ F[f(\mathbf{x})] \equiv \tilde f(\mathbf{G}) = {1\over\Omega_\mathrm{cell}} ...
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1answer
91 views

Inverse Fourier transform of Yukawa potential (troubles with Mathematica)

It can be proved that the potential $\frac{e^{-u|r|}}{|r|}$ has Fourier transform $\frac{4\pi}{u^2+q^2}$. Now, I'm trying to go backwards and do the inverse Fourier transform but I'm running into ...
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1answer
83 views

Image Reconstruction:Phase vs. Magnitude

Figure 1.(c) shows the Test image reconstructed from MAGNITUDE spectrum only. We can say that the intensity values of LOW frequency pixels are comparatively more than HIGH frequency pixels. $$ ...
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1answer
50 views

Phase and amplitude information of an image

By applying Fourier Transform to an image we can get its magnitude as well as phase spectrum. A magnitude spectrum describes how various frequencies are attenuated and accentuated in that image but ...
2
votes
1answer
94 views

Divergent solution in time-dependent Schrödinger equation

if I transform the time-dependent Schrödinger equation without a potential I get: $$ - \hbar \omega \psi(\omega,x) = \frac{- \hbar^2}{2m} \frac{\partial^2 \psi(\omega,x)}{\partial x^2}$$ The ...
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1answer
78 views

Inner product of position and momentum eigenkets

Let's define $\hat{q},\ \hat{p}$ the positon and momentum quantum operators, $\hat{a}$ the annihilation operator and $\hat{a}_1,\ \hat{a}_2$ with its real and imaginary part, such that $$ \hat{a} = ...
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0answers
45 views

Quantum Fourier Transform question regarding measurement

When we use the quantum fourier transform, for a function, the output is entangled, so if a measurement is made on the output, the result may not be that of the function that one wanted in the first ...
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0answers
33 views

Quantum Fourier Transform question

We can formulate a Quantum Fourier Transfrom which is derived from a DFT. This DFT performs a polynomial operation by interpolating over specific sample points, and then when we read the output from ...
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0answers
45 views

Transition Between Position and Momentum Basis

I'm having some trouble following pages 55-56 of Sakurai's Modern Quantum Mechanics. We're trying to transfer from position space into momentum space. Here's a quote: Let us now establish the ...
0
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1answer
43 views

Frequency spectrum and histogram of white noise

I haven't been able to find any images with, so here goes: In the frequency/Fourier spectrum, how does white noise look like ? Is that just random dots all over the place, making it very hard to ...
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1answer
77 views

In quantum mechanics, why position and momentum are related by Fourier Transformation(only)? [duplicate]

We know that if we take Fourier transform of momentum we go to position space. But why Fourier transform only.(credit_ Abh Gupta)
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1answer
109 views

Help with the Heisenberg relation in Gaussian wave

In short laserpulses there is a minimal product of the frequency width and the pulselength for Gaussian pulses $\tau \cdot \Delta\omega \geq4\ln2$ this is the fourier boundary. So I know it origins ...
3
votes
4answers
129 views

Continuous Fourier transform vs. Discrete Fourier transform

Continuous Fourier transform vs. Discrete Fourier transform. Can anyone tell me what the difference is physics-wise? I know the mathematical way to do both, but when do you use the other instead of ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Inverse of a series (solid state)

I am working with the expression involving the equilibrium displacement ($y_n$) for the $n$th particle in a 1D harmonic lattice in terms of the normal modes coordinates $A_k$. Let me show you the ...
0
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2answers
109 views

Representations in quantum mechanics [closed]

This might be a very simple question. I just want someone to point me the right direction to understand things like this: $$ \langle x|x'\rangle=\delta(x-x') \\ \psi(x)=\langle x|\psi\rangle \\ ...
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0answers
30 views

Quick question on convolution - Diffraction through a pair of slits

We know that the fourier transform of the amplitude function (in terms of $y$) gives you the amplitude function (in terms of $\theta$) Consider a pair of triangular slits: Fourier transform of ...
25
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6answers
3k views

Fourier transformation in nature/natural physics?

I just came from a class on Fourier Transformations as applied to signal processing and sound. It all seems pretty abstract to me, so I was wondering if there were any physical systems that would ...
3
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0answers
47 views

Light, Fourier Transforms, Spherical Harmonics

Mathematically, I'm having trouble understanding where we can use what with light. I read somewhere on this site that Huygen's Principle is effectively just taking an expansion of a wave onto the ...
3
votes
2answers
449 views

What is the physical interpretation of the Fourier transform $(\mathcal{F}Z)(t)$ an impedance?

If I compose a impedances out of smaller ones in series and parallel configurations, e.g. $$Z(\omega)=i\omega L_2+\tfrac{1}{\tfrac{1}{R_1}\ +\ i\omega C_1+\ \tfrac{1}{i\omega L_2}},$$ then I get a ...
8
votes
4answers
582 views

Fourier Transforming the Klein Gordon Equation

Starting with the Klein Gordon in position space, \begin{align*} \left(\frac{\partial^2}{\partial t^2} - \nabla^2+m^2\right)\phi(\mathbf{x},t) = 0 \end{align*} And using the Fourier Transform: ...
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0answers
26 views

Is having full information about the resonances of a rigid body equivalent to having full information about its material parameters?

Lets say I have a mechanical system whose mechanical resonances (mode shape and frequency) I can measure with perfect accuracy. Is this theoretically equivalent to knowing the materials parameters, ...
0
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1answer
79 views

Quantum Mechanics - Finding momentum probability density [closed]

everyone. I got a bit stuck on 2(iii), this is supposed to be a easy question, but i don't know how you get the square term? I thought you just do the Fourier transform, but then I got some ...
0
votes
0answers
59 views

Corrections and Normalization for Power Spectrum Calculation

So I'm hoping I can get some help. I have a 2d image and need to get the 1d power spectrum. I know the basic steps: take fft, take fft^2 to get power, then take average power in radial bins to get 1d ...
0
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0answers
32 views

Drawing the wave function for a wave packet

I have the following infotmation: Amplitude-Function: $U(k) = Ae^{-a|k-k_0|}$ Wave Function: $u(x,t) = \frac{A}{\sqrt{2\pi}} \frac{2a}{(x-vt)^2+a^2}e^{ik_0(x-vt)}$ Uncertainty in x: $\Delta x = 1$ ...
3
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0answers
65 views

Kolmogorov/Energy spectrum for turbulent boundary layer

Previously, I have calculated energy spectrum for 3D isotropic turbulent flow data which is equally spaced in all three directions and then to compute the energy spectrum, one performs Fourier ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

How to derive quantum Fourier transform from discrete Fourier transform (DFT)?

I am interested in Shor's algorithm, and I am reading several papers that related to the quantum Fourier transform (QFT). I know the there is a difference between the output of QFT and DFT (DFT). ...
1
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2answers
99 views

Fourier transformation [closed]

I have recently studied Fourier and Laplace transformation in maths. I wanted to understand the utility in physics with some examples that requires this change in dimension and the reason why.