A unitary linear operator which resolves a function on $\mathbb{R}^N$ into a linear superposition of "plane wave functions". Most often used in physics for calcalating the response of a time shift invariant linear system as the sum of its response to time harmonic excitation or for transforming a ...

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37 views

Superposition of waves with different initial phase in Quantum Mechanics

In Quantum Mechanics, if a particle's state is a superposition of many states of definite momentum, then we say that it's position is well-defined (by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, because ...
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0answers
48 views

Solving Laplace's Equation for a point charge at orgin with Fourier transform? [on hold]

Ok So I have Laplaces equation: $\nabla^{2} \phi(\vec{r}) = \frac{q}{\epsilon_{o}} \delta(\vec{r})$ And I want to solve by using Fourier transforms. So I take the Fourier transform of the right ...
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0answers
23 views

Solving Poisson's Equation in 1-D for a point charge? [migrated]

Ok so I was trying to solve the Poisson's equation for a point charge with a Fourier transform to get the familiar equation. This is what I did so far: So ultimately I am trying to solve this in 3 ...
4
votes
2answers
93 views

Is there a mathematical relationship between Legendre conjugates and Fourier conjugates?

In quantum mechanics, there is an uncertainty principle between conjugate variables, giving rise to complementary descriptions of a quantum system. But the variables are conjugates in two different ...
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1answer
40 views

Books on waves with Fourier Transforms

There are many waves and oscillations books out there that also include Fourier analysis but very few give the subject a thorough treatment, they just pass it in a few pages. If anybody has any ...
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1answer
35 views

Fourier expansion and transform - what about the phase of the waves that i am adding?

Say we have a wave on the surface of the water and we want to describe it as a sum of other waves. So we use Fourier expansion to add waves of different wavelengths. For simplicity, say we have to ...
2
votes
1answer
65 views

Fourier Transforms of position and momentum space in Quantum Mechanics

Fourier transformations: for momentum space and for position space. How do we know that Ψ is not the Fourier transform of Φ but we suppose that its the other way around(Ψ would be ...
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0answers
16 views

Dilations in momentum space

I don't quite understand what's going on here. Let's suppose I have a dilation in real space. The generator is $D=x^j \partial_j$, so an infinitesimal dilation is $\delta x^i = Dx^i = x^j \partial_j ...
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1answer
103 views

Effective masses for different direction

Assume we have an indirect semiconductor where the effective mass becomes anisotropic in different directions. Usually, one talks about a mass in parallel and perpendicular direction referring to ...
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1answer
14 views

Whether there is any relationship between the frequency of an input signal and the frequency of it's fourier transform?

Whether there is any relationship between the frequency of an input signal and the frequency of it's fourier transform? For example, suppose I gave a 100Hz signal, whether my FFT frquency will also be ...
4
votes
1answer
158 views

Kolmogorov/Energy spectrum for turbulent boundary layer

Previously, I have calculated energy spectrum for 3D isotropic turbulent flow data which is equally spaced in all three directions and then to compute the energy spectrum, one performs Fourier ...
5
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4answers
1k views

What is the specific meaning of “Fourier frequency” (as opposed to simply “frequency”)?

I've noticed that many journal articles (in optics) use the phrase "Fourier frequency" to describe, well, the frequency of something. Google scholar search for "Fourier frequency". Example: ...
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1answer
81 views

Light, Fourier Transforms, Spherical Harmonics

Mathematically, I'm having trouble understanding where we can use what with light. I read somewhere on this site that Huygen's Principle is effectively just taking an expansion of a wave onto the ...
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2answers
260 views

Numerically solving 2D poisson equation by FFT, proper units

The 2D Poisson equation is: (1)$$\frac{d^2\varphi(x,y)}{dx^2}+\frac{d^2\varphi(x,y)}{dy^2}=-\frac{\varrho(x,y)}{\epsilon_0\epsilon}$$ And in $k$-space it is in form of: (2)$$(k_x^2+k_y^2) ...
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2answers
164 views

Volume of Brillouin zone is the same as Fourier primitive cell?

In Kittel's solid state text, problem 2.3, he says that the volume of the Brillouin zone is the same as a primitive parallelepiped in Fourier space. Somehow I can't see why this is true. Can someone ...
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0answers
25 views

How to find a single coefficient of quantum Fourier transform reliably

Quantum Fourier transform transform $X \in \mathbb{C}^{2^n}$ to $Y \in \mathbb{C}^{2^n}$. Suppose one wishes to find $y_0$, the first coefficient of "vector" $Y$. However, as this is quantum process, ...
4
votes
1answer
190 views

Poles for a particle scattered in a delta potential

I am working on problem a professor gave me to get an idea for the research he does, and have hit a point where I'm having a difficult time seeing where I need to go from where I'm at. I would also ...
5
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1answer
174 views

Which position and momentum distributions arise from some wave function?

Consider a particle in one dimension with wave function $\psi(x)$. The probability density function describing how likely it is to find it in a given position is given by ...
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2answers
131 views

Far Field Diffraction of EM waves: what does the zero frequency signify?

If you have a system of independently radiating electrons/point-charges, the far field distribution of the EM waves can be approximated by the fraunhoffer diffraction integral, or simply by the ...
2
votes
1answer
131 views

Diffraction and $k$-space

Regarding diffraction I am a little bit lost reading about reciprocal space and the space of $k$'s. As I understand it the Fourier relationship between a wavepacket $\Psi(\vec r,t)$ and the complex ...
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4answers
1k views

Fourier Transforming the Klein Gordon Equation

Starting with the Klein Gordon in position space, \begin{align*} \left(\frac{\partial^2}{\partial t^2} - \nabla^2+m^2\right)\phi(\mathbf{x},t) = 0 \end{align*} And using the Fourier Transform: ...
4
votes
2answers
206 views

Massless boson in 2D and its (retarded) propagator

I have the retarded propagator for a free scalar field in 1+1 dimensions. Inside the light cone, this looks like $J_0(m \sqrt(t^2-x^2))$, $J$ being a Bessel function. When I take the massless limit, ...
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1answer
134 views

Resolution in a Fourier transform spectroscopy setup

I am a bachelor physics student and as an assignment we had to perform measurements on an FT spectroscopy setup. Context. Our setup consisted of a Michelson interferometer through which the light ...
1
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1answer
158 views

A few questions on wave packets and uncertainty relations

According to Cohen-Tannoudji the wave-function for a one-dimensional free particle can be written as $$ \psi (x,0)=\frac{1}{\sqrt{2 \pi}} \int g(k) e^{ikx} dk.$$ While $g(k)$ is not specified, there ...
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0answers
14 views

How to apply contrast sensitivity function to an image?

I would like to apply contrast sensitivity function (CSF) to an image. My idea is to do the Fourier tranform of the image and then do the filtering in the frequency domain by applying the CSF. However ...
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votes
1answer
813 views

“Derivation” of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle

The question I outline below is my textbook's "derivation" of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. The "derivation" my textbook uses involves wave packets. Suppose there are seven waves of ...
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1answer
53 views

What does it physically mean to take the Laplace transform of a non-periodic position function?

What I'm trying to get through my head here is how taking the Laplace transform of a system with a position function like $X(t)=t$ is possible. To my current (admittedly incomplete) ...
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2answers
80 views

Why is a sine wave considered the fundamental building block of any signal? Why not some other function? [closed]

It is mathematically possible to express a given signal as a sum of functions other than sines and cosines. With that in mind, why does signal processing always revolve around breaking down the signal ...
2
votes
1answer
101 views

Solving the Klein-Gordon equation via Fourier transform

I have been writing a personal set of notes on QFT and I'm currently writing up a section on solving the Klein-Gordon (K-G) equation. I many texts that I've read, the author starts by expressing the ...
2
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0answers
40 views

How is translational symmetry related to Fourier decomposition?

The book (The Cosmic Microwave Background By Ruth Durrer) about cosmological perturbations says that because of translational symmetry of the background at a constant time, we can decompose our ...
4
votes
2answers
234 views

Why there is no Gibb's phenomenon in QM?

Why we don't see any Gibb's phenomenon in quantum mechanics? EDIT At sharp edges (discontinuities), we usually find ringing. This can be observed in many physical phenomenon (eg. shock waves). ...
2
votes
2answers
158 views

How to learn the wavelet transform?

Is there any good literature if I want to learn the wavelet transform? Especially my project is related with marine electromagnetism?
2
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1answer
98 views

How is Green function in many-body theory introduced?

Normally, for a (linear) operator $L$ and a DE $$ Lu(x) = f(x) $$ the Green function is defined as $$ LG(x,s) = \delta(x-s) $$ and it is found that $$ u(x) = \int G(x,s) f(s) ds $$ is the ...
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3answers
102 views

Whether the job of Fourier Transform is just to convert signals from time domain to frequency domain only or more than it?

I am a beginner . We convert a signal in time domain to frequency domain by applying Fourier transform on the signal to obtain frequency and phase spectrum. So,whether the job of Fourier transform ...
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0answers
31 views

Fourier transformation and mode expansions [duplicate]

Sorry as this is a rather trivial question, but I'm stuck with a certain implication. I'm working on exercise 1.7 from Polchinski where we are given an open string with boundary conditions ...
0
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1answer
45 views

Transforms in physics? [closed]

In my studies I have heard of two types of transformations in the physical science 1) the Fourier transform for diffraction and 2) the Legendre transform for thermodynamic potentials. While ...
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0answers
99 views

Fourier transformation and commutators

Sorry as this is a rather trivial question, but I'm stuck with a certain implication. I'm working on exercise 1.7 from Polchinski where we are given an open string with boundary conditions ...
0
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0answers
19 views

Modelling Fourier Transform Profilometry

Basically I want to simulate a surface profilometry technique through Matlab. For that I want to create a GUI with controls for generating a grating pattern of light at a particular angle with respect ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Expanding free scalar field in terms of ladder operators

I'm having some difficulty with the finer points of expanding a field in terms of ladder operators. Note that this is not identical to the other related question I asked. From Peskin / Schroeder; ...
1
vote
2answers
98 views

How do phase carries structural information about the function? [closed]

Suppose you are on a railway platform and you hear the sound of train coming towards you. Now, Using Fourier transformation we can convert the time domain function (here take sound as a function) ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

Field expansion in Peskin & Schroeder

Peskin and Schroeder state something which I'm not fully understanding. More specificially I think it's just phrased in a way I'm not understanding. In the Schrodinger picture we can expand the real ...
5
votes
1answer
104 views

Physical implications of the Gibbs phenomenon for Quantum Mechanics

From Wikipedia: The Gibbs Phenomenon is the peculiar manner in which the Fourier series of a piecewise continuously differentiable periodic function behaves at a jump discontinuity. The nth ...
2
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0answers
39 views

Autocorrelation function corresponding to density of states with significant rotational motion

Most statistical physics textbooks (at least the ones I've found) state simply that the density of states of a system can be found as the temporal Fourier transform of the velocity autocorrelation ...
5
votes
2answers
334 views

Modeling stochastic process with frequency-dependent power spectrum

I'm trying to model of Johnson-Nyquist noise propagation in a nonlinear circuit. An ideal (linear) resistor can be modeled very nicely by the Fokker-Planck equation (equivalently, the drift-diffusion ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

What is the difference between the momentum in the Fourier transform of a scalar field and the conjugate momentum of the field?

What is the difference between the momentum $p$ in $\exp(ipx)$ in the Fourier transform of a scalar field and the corresponding conjugate momenta $\pi(x)$ of the scalar field?
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1answer
64 views

Probability density for momentum in Quantum Mechanics

In a book i found the following equations: $$ \phi(k)=\frac{1}{\sqrt{2\pi}} \int_{-\infty}^\infty \Psi(x,0)e^{-ikx}dx $$ and $$ \Psi(x,t)=\frac{1}{\sqrt{2\pi}} \int_{-\infty}^\infty ...
0
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1answer
88 views

Problem with momentum values in a QM problem

I have the following equation of $Ψ$ around a ring (the particle is bound to move only on the ring): To visualize the state(it dies before L/2 if L=2πR): We can see from the first picture that ...
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1answer
56 views

How to transform the Laplacian from momentum space to coordinate space

I'm working through some quantum mechanics problems with solution sets (attempting the problems then looking at the solutions to compare), and a little part of a solution has stumped me. I'm not sure ...
1
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1answer
78 views

The proof of a discrete Fourier identity in quantum field theory

On page 25, in the book Quantum Field Theory for the Gifted Amateur by Tom Lancaster and Stephen. J Blundell, it states the following: We impose periodic boundary conditions forcing ...
3
votes
2answers
186 views

What is the significance of the Fourier coefficients?

Let us take an example, a white ray (which is composed of bunch of frequency components) is passed through a prism, the ray gets split (decomposed) into its elementary vibgyor colours (i.e.different ...