A unitary linear operator which resolves a function on $\mathbb{R}^N$ into a linear superposition of "plane wave functions". Most often used in physics for calcalating the response of a time shift invariant linear system as the sum of its response to time harmonic excitation or for transforming a ...

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Uncertainty Principle for a Totally Localized Particle

If a particle is totally localized at $x=0$, its wave function $\Psi(x,t)$ should be a Dirac delta function $\delta(x)$. Accordingly, its Fourier transform $\Phi(p,t)$ would be a constant for all $p$, ...
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6k views

What's a good textbook to learn about waves and oscillations?

I'm taking a course on waves and oscillations using Crawford from the Berkeley series (out of print excluding international copies), and would like to know if anyone has any suggestions for a better ...
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515 views

Very simple example of the way the Fourier transform is used in quantum mechanics?

According to a book I'm reading, the Fourier transform is widely used in quantum mechanics (QM). That came as a huge surprise to me. (Unfortunately, the book doesn't go on to give any simple examples ...
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1k views

Is there a relation between quantum theory and Fourier analysis?

I found that some theories about quantum theory is similar to Fourier transform theory. For instance, it says "A finite-time light's frequency can't be a certain value", which is similar to "A finite ...
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163 views

Renormalization, integrating out high momenta Wilson way

In equation $(12.5)$ in Peskin and Schroeder, they write out the generating function but leave out all quadratic terms of the form $\phi\hat{\phi}$ arguing that they vanish since Fourier ...
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303 views

Fourier transform of two pulses of light

I have laser beam path that fires two pulses of light in a gaussian distribution, so the intensity graph over time is two identical gaussians separated by a distance $t_0$. In other words, a gaussian ...
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1answer
5k views

How does the Fourier Transform invert units?

I don't really understand how units work under operations like derivation and integration. In particular, I am interested in understanding how the Fourier transform gives inverse units (i.e. time ...
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561 views

“Optically performed” Fourier Transform

This article says that they are only able to achieve such extremely high fiberoptic data rates because the multiplex light and then use a Fourier Transform to split it up again. But they say that ...
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245 views

$2\pi$ and Feynman Rules

I notice a $2\pi$ term in the $\delta$-function when trying to construct an amplitude using the Feynman Rules. The $2\pi$ also appears as an integration measure to enforce normalisation in the phase ...
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99 views

Shifting momentum by a constant in the Schrodinger Equation

My book states that if we perturb a given Hamiltonian for the Schrödinger Equation $$ H = \frac{p^2}{2m} +V(x) $$ to $$ H' = \frac{p^2}{2m} + V(x) + \frac{\lambda p}{m} $$ then we can rewrite ...
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125 views

Is there a mathematical relationship between Legendre conjugates and Fourier conjugates?

In quantum mechanics, there is an uncertainty principle between conjugate variables, giving rise to complementary descriptions of a quantum system. But the variables are conjugates in two different ...
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283 views

Analogies between Fraunhofer diffraction and Josephson junctions

There are several analogies between diffraction patterns and Josephson junctions, especially between a double slit experiment and two Josephson junctions in a superconducting ring (like this): Both ...
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292 views

A question from Srednicki's QFT textbook

I have a question in Srednicki's QFT textbook. In order to compute the vacuum to vacuum transition amplitude given by : $$\left \langle 0|0 \right \rangle_{J}~=~\int \left [ d\varphi \right ]e^{i\int ...
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1answer
127 views

Quantization of a free field: Klein-Gordon case

I am a beginner and reading this course text on QFT. The author first introduces the KG equation: $$\partial_\mu\partial^{\mu}\phi+m^2\phi=0$$ [with Minkowski signature $(+,-,-,-)$]. Then the ...
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357 views

Image Reconstruction:Phase vs. Magnitude

Figure 1.(c) shows the Test image reconstructed from MAGNITUDE spectrum only. We can say that the intensity values of LOW frequency pixels are comparatively more than HIGH frequency pixels. $$ ...
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What is the physical interpretation of the Fourier transform $(\mathcal{F}Z)(t)$ an impedance?

If I compose a impedances out of smaller ones in series and parallel configurations, e.g. $$Z(\omega)=i\omega L_2+\tfrac{1}{\tfrac{1}{R_1}\ +\ i\omega C_1+\ \tfrac{1}{i\omega L_2}},$$ then I get a ...
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468 views

Inverse Fourier Transform Of K-space Image…what is the object space scale?

Checked around a buch and could not find any help. But I needed help with: Understanding that if I get the Inverse FT of K-space data, what is the scaling on the X-space (object space) resultant ...
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547 views

Effect of a wavefront deformation on the far-field diffraction pattern of a TEM00

By performing Matlab simulations on a TEM00 mode (approximated by a gaussian intensity profile with a flat wavefront), I got the impression that applying wavefront deformations (such as a single ...
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286 views

Massless boson in 2D and its (retarded) propagator

I have the retarded propagator for a free scalar field in 1+1 dimensions. Inside the light cone, this looks like $J_0(m \sqrt(t^2-x^2))$, $J$ being a Bessel function. When I take the massless limit, ...
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100 views

Light, Fourier Transforms, Spherical Harmonics

Mathematically, I'm having trouble understanding where we can use what with light. I read somewhere on this site that Huygen's Principle is effectively just taking an expansion of a wave onto the ...
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1answer
224 views

Getting an equivalent integral equation from a given one

I'm reading a paper and don't understand some of the calculations. We are given an integral equation with asymptotic boundary conditions $\rho_+(u)=\frac{1}{2\pi} ...
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1answer
654 views

Fourier transformation, electric field and magnetic field to have a shielding lattice against particles

With Fourier-Series Expansion, we can write a function as sum of many non-repating different frequncied different amplituded sine and cosine functions. Lets assume we know electric-field and ...
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167 views

Far field diffraction of EM waves: what does the zero frequency signify?

If you have a system of independently radiating electrons/point-charges, the far field distribution of the EM waves can be approximated by the Fraunhoffer diffraction integral, or simply by the ...
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97 views

Non-Hermiticity when Fourier transforming onto a finite lattice

I'm doing numerical simulations. I have the Haldane model in a honeycomb lattice where $$ H = \sum \limits_{<ij>}a^\dagger_i b_j + h.c $$ Where $i$ belongs to sublattice $A$, and $j$ to ...
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497 views

Does this statement make any sense?

I am asking this question completely out of curiosity. The other day, my roommate, by mistake, used 'Light year' as a unit of time instead of distance. When I corrected him (pedantic, much), he said ...
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Why are AC quantities represented by sine waves always?

Usually we use a sinusoidal wave form to represent a alternating quantity. Why not a cosinusoidal wave or a ramp wave form? In sine wave forms we can indicate the maximum and minimum amplitude and ...
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307 views

Why higher frequencies in Fourier series are more suppressed than lower frequencies?

One can expand any periodic function in sines and cosines. When calculating the coefficients $a_0$, $a_n$, and $b_n$ one find that $a_1>a_2>...>a_n>...$, similarly for $b_n$. Is there an ...
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422 views

What information is stored on gramaphones/tape recorders/CDs/DVDs

I'm a Software Developer by profession and my physics knowledge is limited what I had learned at high school level. Please excuse me if the question is trivial. Question: From what I know, a sound ...
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1k views

How do human ears distinguish the frequencies in sound?

If they do a Fourier transform, how can they know the formula to find coefficients?
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113 views

How can $F_0\cos\omega t$ change to $F_0e^{i\omega t}$ in driven oscillator equation?

I have one thing that confuses me on deriving the solution for the Linear Forced Oscillator. Suppose we have the equation as $$ma + rv + kx = F_0 \cos \omega t$$ What confuses me is when the driving ...
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3answers
882 views

The Dirac-Delta function as an initial state for the quantum free particle

I want to ask if it is reasonable that I use the Dirac-Delta function as an intial state ($\Psi (x,0) $) for the free particle wavefunction and interpret it such that I say that the particle is ...
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210 views

Fourier Transforms Related to Green's Functions

I'm reading a text on field theory where there are a number of assertions made about Fourier transforms that I'm finding confusing. For example, let $G^R = -i \theta(t - t')e^{-i \omega_0 (t - t')}$. ...
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237 views

What is the significance of the Fourier coefficients?

Let us take an example, a white ray (which is composed of bunch of frequency components) is passed through a prism, the ray gets split (decomposed) into its elementary vibgyor colours (i.e.different ...
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96 views

Derivation of canonical position-momentum commutator relation

We know that the position-momentum commutator is fundamental in quantum mechanics, but would it be possible to derive it starting from a different set of first principles, more specifically starting ...
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231 views

How is Green function in many-body theory introduced?

Normally, for a (linear) operator $L$ and a DE $$ Lu(x) = f(x) $$ the Green function is defined as $$ LG(x,s) = \delta(x-s) $$ and it is found that $$ u(x) = \int G(x,s) f(s) ds $$ is the ...
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238 views

Is a wave packet physically realizable as a Fourier series?

In QM a wave packet is modeled as an infinite, or almost infinite, Fourier series, and the Fourier transform provides a transformation between momentum space and position space. To what extent is ...
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314 views

Why does $\nabla \to ik$ when you Fourier transform?

I am reading a text that describes the scattering of light by a particle with dielectric constant $\epsilon$ After a bit of maths starting from Maxwell's equations they obtain: $$\nabla (\nabla ...
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725 views

Field theory:functional derivative involving Fourier Transform

I have to solve the following functional derivative $$ \frac{\delta}{\delta \Lambda(\mathbf{x})}\log[A-\mathbf{k}^2\Lambda(\mathbf{k})] $$ where $\Lambda(\mathbf{k})$ is the Fourier transform of ...
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336 views

The appearance of volume $V$ in the Fourier series representation of a periodic cubic system

In the textbook Understanding Molecular Simulation by Frenkel and Smit (Second Edition), the authors represent a function $f(\textbf{r})$ (which depends on the coordinates of a periodic system) as a ...
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1answer
372 views

Plane wave complex notation

As far as I know, the function: $$ \vec{E}(\vec{r},t)=\vec{E_0}\cdot e^{i(\vec{k}\cdot \vec{r}-\omega t)} \hspace{2cm}(1) $$ is a mathematical solution of the wave equation: $$ \nabla^2 ...
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1answer
653 views

Derivation of Green's Function for Wave Equation

In the textbook Modern Methods in Analytical Acoustics (Crighton-1992, Amazon link to 2013 edition) the following relates the 3D Green's function in the time-domain to the frequency domain $g(x-y)$: ...
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1answer
77 views

Numerically solving a simple Schrodinger equation with fast Fourier transforms

While trying to solve a stochastic Gross-Piaevskii equation I have found a problem that can be tracked down to something buggy occurring in the simplest Schrodinger equation possible: $$\partial_t ...
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1answer
95 views

Considering $\langle \underline{q} \mid \underline{p} \rangle=\frac{1}{(2\pi\hbar)^{n/2}}e^{i\underline{q}\cdot\underline{p}/\hbar}$ [duplicate]

I have been given the following complete systems of eigenvectors $$\mathbf{Q}\mid\mathbf{q} \rangle=\mathbf{q}\mid\mathbf{q} \rangle, \quad \mathbf{P}\mid\mathbf{p} \rangle=\mathbf{p}\mid\mathbf{p} ...
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1answer
412 views

Determining Fourier Coefficients by inspection

I'm beginning to learn about Fourier series/transforms. My teacher hopes that by now we should be able to examine a simple potential function and decompose it without having to actually do the ...
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1answer
377 views

Coulomb potential

It is known that the Coulomb potential can be obtained by Fourier transform of the propagator from E&M. Is this because one of Maxwell's equations have the form $\nabla \cdot \mathbf{E}=\rho$?
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997 views

Particle in a 1D box (momentum representation)

I have this problem. I want to find the wave function in the momentum space for the particle in a 1D box. We know that the wave function in the position space is: $$Y_n(x) = A\sin{(n\pi x/L)}$$ ...
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1answer
465 views

What would we never know in Physics if Fourier Transform were not discovered? [closed]

I am still unsure if Fourier Transform has any fundamental significance in Physics. Is it anything more than a calculation tool? For example sometimes people Fourier transform an equation to solve it ...
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1answer
2k views

Finding $\psi(x,t)$ for a free particle starting from a Gaussian wave profile $\psi(x)$

Consider a free-particle with a Gaussian wavefunction, $$\psi(x)~=~\left(\frac{a}{\pi}\right)^{1/4}e^{-\frac12a x^2},$$ find $\psi(x,t)$. The wavefunction is already normalized, so the next thing to ...
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1answer
80 views

Describing quantum intereference with only currents and densities

I know about and believe to understand the general wave equation based Kirchhoff diffraction formula, which in the Fraunhofer limit leads to a farfield complex wave function by Fourier transforming ...
3
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1answer
100 views

Path integral measure Fourier transformation for case of real field

Let's have $$ Z[J] = \int D \varphi e^{iS[\varphi , J]}, $$ where $\varphi$ denotes real scalar field. Let's make Fourier transform, $$ \varphi (x) = \int e^{iqx}\varphi (q), \quad \varphi^{*} (q) = ...