A unitary linear operator which resolves a function on $\mathbb{R}^N$ into a linear superposition of "plane wave functions". Most often used in physics for calcalating the response of a time shift invariant linear system as the sum of its response to time harmonic excitation or for transforming a ...

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353 views

Jacobian, Lorentz and Fourier Transformation

Jacobian, Lorentz and Fourier Transformation. I am confused with the physical interpretation/meaning of all these transformations. As far as I understood, Jacobian transforms from one coordinate ...
2
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2answers
215 views

What restrictions on time boundary conditions does it have to use Fourier transform to solve wave equation?

The wave equation can be solved using Fourier transform, by assuming a solution of the form of $$\mathbf{E}(x,y,z,t)~=~\mathbf{E}(x,y,z)e^{j\omega t}$$ and then reducing the equation to the Helmholtz ...
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3answers
1k views

What is the meaning of “frequency of a human voice”?

The term frequency for a periodic wave can be defined as the number of times a repeating pattern occurs in a given time period (eg: no. of crest and trough cycles per second for EM wave). But what ...
2
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1answer
108 views

How to learn the wavelet transform?

Is there any good literature if I want to learn the wavelet transform? Especially my project is related with marine electromagnetism?
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1answer
82 views

How can I model a two dimensional and three dimensional equivalents of one dimensional delta dirac (impulse) function?

I just started to read the book 'A Brief History of Time' by Stephen Hawking. Actually When he was talking of the idea of infinite density 'thing' before big bang suddenly the mathematical function ...
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2answers
69 views

Brewster angle with diffraction propagation?

Diffraction theory is scalar. How you deal with beam propagation in fourier optics that is sensitive to the to the polarization? If I have linearly polarized gaussian beam incident on glass surface, ...
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1answer
127 views

Unit analysis of a Fourier transform

This is an extension of a Phys.SE question I asked earlier, Fourier transform of two pulses of light. I start with 2 Gaussians, represented by the equation $e^{-(t/a)^2}\times e^{2\pi i d ...
4
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3answers
165 views

Fourier transform of two pulses of light

I have laser beam path that fires two pulses of light in a gaussian distribution, so the intensity graph over time is two identical gaussians separated by a distance $t_0$. In other words, a gaussian ...
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1answer
216 views

Parseval's Theorem on a Random Signal

NB - I'm re-posting this question in physics because I haven't had any luck getting a response from the maths StackExchange site - it's a rather applied problem so is probably better suited here ...
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3answers
381 views

How do human ears distinguish the frequencies in sound?

If they do a Fourier transform, how can they know the formula to find coefficients?
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0answers
34 views

How to prove autocorrelation is always bigger than the x-space signal?

I was just wondering how I would go about to proving that the autocorrelation (IFFT of the Intensity spectrum) is always bigger than the actual x-space signal? Thanks
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2answers
368 views

>What is the physical interpretation of the Fourier transform $(\mathcal{F}Z)(t)$ an impedance?

If I compose a impedances out of smaller ones in series and parallel configurations, e.g. $$Z(\omega)=i\omega L_2+\tfrac{1}{\tfrac{1}{R_1}\ +\ i\omega C_1+\ \tfrac{1}{i\omega L_2}},$$ then I get a ...
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2answers
235 views

Inverse Fourier Transform Of K-space Image…what is the object space scale?

Checked around a buch and could not find any help. But I needed help with: Understanding that if I get the Inverse FT of K-space data, what is the scaling on the X-space (object space) resultant ...
3
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1answer
221 views

Coulomb potential

It is known that the Coulomb potential can be obtained by Fourier transform of the propagator from E&M. Is this because one of Maxwell's equations have the form $\nabla \cdot \mathbf{E}=\rho$?
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2answers
105 views

Frequency calculator

I have a bunch of readings of a wave consisting of volts and time. I need to calculate the frequency of the biggest wave, but i'm not sure exactly how. From what I've researched I'm thinking I need to ...
2
votes
3answers
514 views

Fourier series of single tone modulated wave

When a single-tone continuous modulating signal modulates a sinusoidal carrier, isn't the modulated wave periodic? If so, can't we apply fourier series and determine the harmonic frequency components ...
4
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1answer
271 views

Fourier transformation, electric field and magnetic field to have a shielding lattice against particles

With Fourier-Series Expansion, we can write a function as sum of many non-repating different frequncied different amplituded sine and cosine functions. Lets assume we know electric-field and ...
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0answers
79 views

Periodic sequence with exponentially increasing period?

I have to develop a physical model for a certain type of biological oscillation that can be built upon periodic sequences. From earlier questions I know that any periodic sequence (containing $0$s ...
3
votes
2answers
457 views

Particle in a 1D box (momentum representation)

I have this problem. I want to find the wave function in the momentum space for the particle in a 1D box. We know that the wave function in the position space is: $$Y_n(x) = A\sin{(n\pi x/L)}$$ ...
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votes
3answers
154 views

No well-defined frequency for a wave packet?

There are similar questions to mine on this site, but not quite what I am asking (I think). The de Broglie relations for energy and momentum $$ \lambda = \frac{h}{p}, \\ \nu = E/h .$$ equate a ...
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0answers
52 views

Outflow for fluid simulation based on “Stable Fluids”

I've implemented a fluid simulation based on the paper Stable Fluids. It works quite well, except I would like to have the velocity at the "upper" edge just to outflow and not to re-enter on the ...
2
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0answers
107 views

Number theoretical function applied in physics? [closed]

I have a series of number theoretic phenomena (mathematics) that I can describe exactly by the superpositions or linear combination of the below function (I know it is an inverse Fourier type). Does ...
3
votes
0answers
76 views

Non-Hermiticity when Fourier transforming onto a finite lattice

I'm doing numerical simulations. I have the Haldane model in a honeycomb lattice where $$ H = \sum \limits_{<ij>}a^\dagger_i b_j + h.c $$ Where $i$ belongs to sublattice $A$, and $j$ to ...
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2answers
1k views

From position space to momentum space

Lets say I have a state vector $\left|\Psi(t)\right\rangle$ in a position space with an orthonormal position basis. If I now use an operator $\hat{p}$ on this basis I will get basis which corresponds ...
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votes
2answers
529 views

What's the physical significance of using fourier transform for diffraction?

I am studying some basic idea of diffraction and there mention in far field, the diffraction pattern could be understood by Fourier transform. But I just don't understand what's the physical fact for ...
2
votes
2answers
348 views

Convolution kernel of poisson equation by FFT

I'm trying to solve poisson equation using FFT. In genral it is a convolution of the charge density with potential well of point charge ( Green's function of laplace equation ) which is $1/r$ I'm ...
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0answers
119 views

Fourier Transform of ribbon's beam Electric Field

I have a monochromatic ribbon beam with $E(x)e^{i(kz-\omega t)}$ being the electric field's amplitude. I want to show that the lowest order approximation in terms of plane waves is ...
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2answers
305 views

A four-dimensional integral in Peskin & Schroeder

The following identity is used in Peskin & Schroeder's book Eq.(19.43), page 660: ...
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1answer
85 views

Why pulse waves results in wave packets?

I was doing experiments of measuring sonic velocity and I generate pulse waves from sensor 1, but when they are received by sensor 2, I saw wave packets on the oscilloscope, can you explain why? I was ...
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0answers
123 views

How to solve following equation (Yukawa field)?

By using Lagrangian for Yukawa interaction, $$ L = -\frac{1}{c}A_{\alpha}j^{\alpha} + \frac{1}{8 \pi c}(\partial_{\alpha}A_{\beta})(\partial^{\alpha}A^{\beta}) + ...
5
votes
1answer
454 views

Fourier Transform on a Riemannian Manifold

The question is quite simple: What would be the definition of Fourier Transform (and it's inverse) on a Riemannian Manifold? I've found that a similar question has been asked at Mathematics.SE but ...
0
votes
1answer
256 views

Weird integration of gaussian wave packet

I have been learning Fourier transformation of a gaussian wave packet and i don't know how to calculate this integral: In the above integral we try to calculate $\varphi(\alpha)$ where $\alpha$ is ...
0
votes
1answer
352 views

Fourier transform between $x$ and $p$

On this page right at the top they mention two sets of fourier transform. First set is connection between $x$ (position) and $k$ (wave vector) space: $$ \begin{split} f(x) &= ...
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1answer
2k views

Gaussian wave packet

At our QM intro our professor said that we derive uncertainty principle using the integral of plane waves $\psi = \psi_0(k) e^{i(kx - \omega t)}$ over wave numbers $k$. We do it at $t=0$ hence $\psi = ...
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1answer
110 views

Dynamic structure factor

Dynamic structure factor is the spatial and temporal Fourier transform of Van Hoves time dependent pair correlation function. It is written as $$ S(k,\omega)= \frac{1}{2\pi}\int F(k,t)\exp(i\omega ...
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votes
3answers
2k views

Why are AC quantities represented by sine waves always?

Usually we use a sinusoidal wave form to represent a alternating quantity. Why not a cosinusoidal wave or a ramp wave form? In sine wave forms we can indicate the maximum and minimum amplitude and ...
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3answers
126 views

How to design an experiment that shows that a rectangular pulse can be expressed as a series of infinite sinusoids?

Is it possible to design a physical experiment that shows that a time limited signal, such as a rectangular pulse is composed of infinite continuous sine/cosine waves?
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3answers
2k views

Magnitude of the Fourier Transform of White Noise

Say you have two white noise signals with different variation amplitudes A1 and A2 as shown in this beautiful Excel graph: Ignoring the DC offset as it's been represented here, how do you relate ...
5
votes
3answers
474 views

Why use Fourier expansion in Quantum Field Theory?

I have just begun studying quantum field theory and am following the book by Peskin and Schroeder for that. So while quantising the Klein Gordon field, we Fourier expand the field and then work only ...
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vote
1answer
258 views

What's the average position of oscillating particles in a box with periodic boundary conditions?

Imagine an open box repeating itself in a way that a if a particle crossing one of the box boundary is "teleported" on the opposite boundary (typical periodic boundary position in 3D). Now put a ...
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votes
1answer
848 views

Physical Significance of Fourier Transform and Uncertainty Relationships

What is the physical significance of a fourier transform? I am interested in knowing exactly how it works when crossing over from momentum space to co ordinate space and also how we arrive at the ...
3
votes
3answers
180 views

What information is stored on gramaphones/tape recorders/CDs/DVDs

I'm a Software Developer by profession and my physics knowledge is limited what I had learned at high school level. Please excuse me if the question is trivial. Question: From what I know, a sound ...
2
votes
1answer
317 views

What would we never know in Physics if Fourier Transform were not discovered? [closed]

I am still unsure if Fourier Transform has any fundamental significance in Physics. Is it anything more than a calculation tool? For example sometimes people Fourier transform an equation to solve it ...
7
votes
2answers
430 views

Was uncertainty principle inferred by Fourier analysis?

I would like to know: did Heisenberg chance upon his Uncertainty Principle by performing Fourier analysis of wavepackets, after assuming that electrons can be treated as wavepackets?
5
votes
1answer
331 views

Intuition behind Fourier transformed spaces

Intuitively I've been able to understand a Fourier transform a change-of-basis formula - you're basically moving from position to momentum basis or from time to frequency - but what does it mean that ...
4
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3answers
2k views

What is the significance of negative frequency in Fourier transform?

What is the significance of negative frequency in Fourier transform? Why we include the band widths of the negative frequency also while calculating band width of the signal.
7
votes
2answers
215 views

Does light have timbre?

Timbre is a property associated with the shape of a sound wave, that is, the coefficients of the discrete Fourier transform of the corresponding signal. This is why a violin and a piano can each play ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Canonical Commutation Relations

Is it logically sound to accept the canonical commutation relation (CCR) $$[x,p]~=~i\hbar$$ as a postulate of quantum mechanics? Or is it more correct to derive it given some form for $p$ in the ...
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0answers
174 views

Splitting light into colors, mathematical expression (fourier transforms)

I am trying to solve a problem that includes a function of the light hitting a certain area. My question is, how would I change a function $G(x)$ of photons hitting a certain area to include just ...
10
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3answers
721 views

Evaluating propagator without the epsilon trick

Consider the Klein–Gordon equation and its propagator: $$G(x,y) = \frac{1}{(2\pi)^4}\int d^4 p \frac{e^{-i p.(x-y)}}{p^2 - m^2} \; .$$ I'd like to see a method of evaluating explicit form of $G$ ...