0
votes
2answers
111 views

Representations in quantum mechanics [closed]

This might be a very simple question. I just want someone to point me the right direction to understand things like this: $$ \langle x|x'\rangle=\delta(x-x') \\ \psi(x)=\langle x|\psi\rangle \\ ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Drawing the wave function for a wave packet

I have the following infotmation: Amplitude-Function: $U(k) = Ae^{-a|k-k_0|}$ Wave Function: $u(x,t) = \frac{A}{\sqrt{2\pi}} \frac{2a}{(x-vt)^2+a^2}e^{ik_0(x-vt)}$ Uncertainty in x: $\Delta x = 1$ ...
2
votes
1answer
106 views

Three dimensional wave packets in momentum space

I am given the 3D wave packet: $$\psi(x,y,z)=N\,\exp\left(\frac{-(x^2+y^2+2z^2)}{2a^2}\right).$$ I was asked to find N (easy enough). Then I was asked the probability that we measure $z$ greater than ...
2
votes
0answers
85 views

Momentum representation of a state

I am trying to figure out the momentum representation of the state which has the properties $$\langle \psi |\hat q |\psi \rangle=-q_0,$$ $$\langle\psi|\hat p|\psi \rangle=p_0, $$$$\Delta q\Delta ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Transition from coordinate space to momentum space for SHO

I am given that the ground state of the SHO in position space is given as $$\langle q|\psi_0\rangle=\frac{1}{a^{\frac12}\pi^{\frac14}}e^{-q/4a^2}$$ Where a is a constant with units of length. I am ...
0
votes
1answer
452 views

Wave packets and the derivation of Schrodinger's equation

I studied in my class, that a plane progressive wave cannot be used to represent the wave nature of a particle as it is not square integrable. Also, the phase velocity can get above the value of $c$, ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

Momentum representation of a function with discontinuous derivative [closed]

Consider the following wave packet $$\psi = Ce^{2\pi i p_0x/h}e^{-|x|/(2\Delta x)}$$ where $h$ is the Planck's constant and $C$ is the normalization constant. The derivative of this function is ...
9
votes
3answers
292 views

Reconstruction of “wavefunction” phases from $|\psi(x)|$ and $|\tilde \psi(p)|$

Consider a "wavefunction" $\psi(x)$, which has a Fourier transform $\tilde \psi(p)$ Suppose that we know, for each $x$, $|\psi(x)|^2$, and that we know, for each $p$, $|\tilde \psi(p)|^2$. Have we ...
4
votes
3answers
198 views

No well-defined frequency for a wave packet?

There are similar questions to mine on this site, but not quite what I am asking (I think). The de Broglie relations for energy and momentum $$ \lambda = \frac{h}{p}, \\ \nu = E/h .$$ equate a ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Gaussian wave packet

At our QM intro our professor said that we derive uncertainty principle using the integral of plane waves $\psi = \psi_0(k) e^{i(kx - \omega t)}$ over wave numbers $k$. We do it at $t=0$ hence $\psi = ...
8
votes
2answers
480 views

Was uncertainty principle inferred by Fourier analysis?

I would like to know: did Heisenberg chance upon his Uncertainty Principle by performing Fourier analysis of wavepackets, after assuming that electrons can be treated as wavepackets?
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Finding $\psi(x,t)$ for a free particle starting from a Gaussian wave profile $\psi(x)$

Consider a free-particle with a Gaussian wavefunction, $$\psi(x)~=~\left(\frac{a}{\pi}\right)^{1/4}e^{-\frac12a x^2},$$ find $\psi(x,t)$. The wavefunction is already normalized, so the next thing to ...
2
votes
2answers
201 views

Measurement and uncertainty principle in QM

The Wikipedia says on the page for the uncertainty principle: Mathematically, the uncertainty relation between position and momentum arises because the expressions of the wave function in the two ...
1
vote
2answers
224 views

Expressing a particle's matter wave in terms of its momentum

I'm following Zettili's QM book and on p. 39 the following manipulation is done, Given a localized wave function (called a wave packet), it can be expressed as $$\psi(x,t) = \frac{1}{\sqrt{ 2 \pi}} ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the relation between position and momentum wavefunctions in quantum physics?

I have read in a couple of places that $\psi(p)$ and $\psi(q)$ are Fourier transforms of one another (e.g. Penrose). But isn't a Fourier transform simply a decomposition of a function into a sum or ...