This tag is for the classical concept of forces, i.e. the quantities causing an acceleration of a body. It expands to the strong/electroweak force only insofar as they act comparable to ‘classical’ forces. Use [tag:particle-physics] for decay channels due to forces and [tag:newtonian-mechanics] or ...

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1answer
14 views

Must multiple forces be expressed as a differential equation?

This may be a stupidly obvious question, but can multiple forces (such as acceleration due to gravity and air resistance acting on a falling object) be expressed algebraicly or must it be written in ...
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1answer
49 views

Conservative force for impulse analogous to conservative force for work done?

As force $F(x)$ can be conservative regarding work done between two points in space, can force $F(t)$ be conservative regarding impulse between two points in time?
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2answers
94 views

Why $F_\mu V^\mu=0$ in special relativity? [closed]

I'm trying to prove why $F_\mu V^\mu=0$. Where $F^\mu$ is the four force and $V^\mu$ is the four velocity. Can anyone help me?
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1answer
37 views

Work done relation to potential energy

I know work done is negative of change in potential energy, I.e., $W=-(∆U)$. It means that Work done against a force (or work done on a system) increases its potential energy. And Work done by a ...
1
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1answer
29 views

Rolling motion of a rigid object

I have the situation described in this picture I know the speed of the ball at the top of the loop ($v_{top} = 2.38 m/s$), and I have to demonstrate that the ball does not fall from the track at ...
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0answers
26 views

Scanning Electron Microscopy on a smaller scale

Is it possible to sufficiently focus a ~1nm beam of electrons into a sample chamber in less than 10cm of vertical space, therefore reducing the volume of the entire vacuum chamber, and subsequently ...
1
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1answer
73 views

Understanding Newton's Laws of Motion

I'm having difficulty understand Newton's laws of motion in practice, and how to model true dynamic systems. There are two examples below, where I cannot quite figure out what the true forces and ...
1
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1answer
46 views

Which one would has a greater magnitude, the viscous drag or the weight of the bubble?

An air bubble in a tank of water is rising with constant velocity. The forces acting on the bubble are X, Y and Z as shown. What describes the three forces? A) Z is the viscous drag ...
3
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3answers
73 views

Friction-free rolling/sliding on an inclined plane

Suppose a sphere is rolling down an inclined plane. There is no friction. The body will not roll and undergo just a translation. But why is this so? If we consider the axis to be along the point of ...
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2answers
50 views

Minimum force needed to keep the book from slipping?

I would just like to know if my answer to part C is correct because I am confident in parts a and b, Also note that 51.5N is the wrong value for P. P=515N. Ok so since P= normal force, this means ...
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2answers
42 views

Electric Field and Force from four particles

Four charged particles are arranged in a square as shown below, with A=3, B=4, and C=5 (a) Determine the electric field at the location of charge q. (Use the following as necessary: $q$, $a$, and $...
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4answers
63 views

Forces at angles being resolved into perpendicular components

Why is that when a force acts at 30° from the horizontal, for example, that its horizontal and vertical components can be treated as being separate?
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5answers
104 views

Can there be an acceleration when no net force acts on a massless object?

If no net force acts on a massless object can there be any acceleration of the object? My attempt: $$F=ma\\ \implies a=F/m\\ \implies a=0/0 $$ $\implies a$ can be anything.
1
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1answer
70 views

Block resting on an inclined plane [closed]

A block of wood of mass 3 kg is resting on the surface of a rough inclined surface as shown in the image. We have to calculate the value of all the three forces. The solution says that frictional ...
3
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4answers
90 views

Is a normal force acting on an object that is hanging from the ceiling?

I've only taken two semesters of calculus-based physics as part of my general education credits at university. Please keep this in mind when reading this question and framing answers. Today I ...
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0answers
39 views

How does mass and acceleration affect the tension in a string?

How does the tension in 1.A Massless string differ from the tension in string having mass 2.A Non accelerated string differ from the tension in an accelerated string 3.A Massless and ...
1
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1answer
46 views

Normal force for a Bike on an incline

So, in general I know how the find the normal force for an object on an incline, but this one is a bit harder, since the bike essentially has two normal forces like so: where L is the length of the ...
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2answers
53 views

Virtual Work- Is the presentation in Cornelius Lanczos wrong?

Book: The Variational Principles of Mechanics by Cornelius Lanczos Edition: 4th Chapter: 3, The Principle of Virtual Work I am on the second page of the 3rd chapter (pg 75; it has the Eqn. 31.1). ...
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1answer
78 views

How does a lever magnify force? [duplicate]

I understand that energy is conserved when a force is applied to the end of a lever and magnified closer to the pivot point. However, I would like to know how it is the force is transferred and ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Could we find the overall force and direction of something with a diagram only? (i.e. no calculation)

My friend, who is a geologist, and I were just debating some dynamics stuff. To make this easier, lets come up with an analogy......lets say there's a boat and it's being pulled by two smaller boats ...
12
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3answers
2k views

What are some phenomena that can not be described without the help of Newton's third law of motion? [closed]

What are some phenomena that can not be described without the help of Newton's third law of motion? All the phenomena I can think of can be explained with the help of Newton's first law or second law. ...
3
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0answers
49 views

Centrifugal force in the two body problem?

In the two body problem, the Effective radial potential energy in general relativity is given by $$ V(r)=-\frac{G M m}{r}+\frac{L^{2}}{2\mu r^{2}}-\frac{G(M+m)L^{2}}{c^{2}\mu r^{3}} $$ where the ...
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2answers
53 views

Newton's Third Law

Sorry if this question's been asked. I looked through some of the questions but didn't find a similar enough question. My question on Newton's Third Law: It's my understanding that if you were in ...
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0answers
29 views

How to model muscle contraction force acting on two bones connected by joint?

I'm trying to understand what is a correct way to model a muscle contraction in a physics engine like PhysX (Unity3D). Muscle that I'm modelling is connected to a bones in 2 points A and B. Having a ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

The components of applied forces on the masses of a Trebuchet

Background information: I was following an online mechanics document in order to learn how to derive the equations of motion for a trebuchet (shown below) using Lagrangian mechanics. At some point ...
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0answers
74 views

How do we know that electrons are affected by gravity?

There are some theories of gravity which explain it as emerging from other fundamental forces. To better understand the evidence for and against these theories, I would like to have a better ...
0
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1answer
33 views

Conservation of mechanical energy when object strikes the ground

When I raise a pen, the external work I do gets stored in the form of potential energy hence the mechanical energy is increased. When I leave the pen the pen starts falling and as the potential energy ...
3
votes
3answers
368 views

Why the $r$ is cubed in the vector notation for of Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation? [duplicate]

I'm learning about astrodynamics on my own and I was wondering why the $r$ is cubed in the vector notation for of Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation: $$\vec{F}_g=\frac{Gm_1m_2}{|\vec{r}|^3}\vec{r}$...
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2answers
49 views

Why doesn't the gravitational force have a permittivity in its formula? [duplicate]

We know that the electrostatic force between two charges depends on the medium between the charges and its permittivity. Why, then, doesn't the gravitational force depend on the medium?
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1answer
112 views

What force is needed to put an object 200m into the air? [closed]

How much force (is that the word I am looking for?) is needed to put a 60kg weight 200m into the air using a lever? Essentially flinging the weight into the air, eg someone throwing a ball into the ...
1
vote
2answers
34 views

How do I draw the force field lines of an isotropic oscillator?

In general, how do I draw the force field lines (in the sense of Faraday, i.e. continuous curves whose tangents give the directions and the density of lines give the intensity of the field) of a ...
1
vote
2answers
79 views

What is more basic thing to explain phenomenons : Energy or Force? [closed]

You know many physical happening are explained by considering forces or we can explain these phenomenon using energy (like energy conservation, etc.). so i was wondering that explaining the physical ...
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1answer
34 views

What is The force a body exerts on a vertical circular track?

I am trying to calculate the force a body exerts on a vertical circular track with no friction at its highest point I know the centripetal force at that point is mg and the given data is the velocity ...
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votes
2answers
68 views

Pressure exerted by a gas and the ideal gas equation

While determining the pressure exerted by any gas at a temperature why do we not consider the surface area of the container in which it is kept? We say that : P=nRT/V, where, n is the no. of moles, R ...
0
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1answer
44 views

normal force on a physical pendulum [duplicate]

I have read and understood that a normal force has got nothing to do with torque on a physical pendulum. But I can't understand in which direction the normal force points to. Can someone help? This ...
2
votes
2answers
86 views

Question about inertial mass and gravitational mass

I know that inertial mass $m_i$ is the quantity that appears in Newton's second law: $F=m_ia$ and that gravitational mass $m_{g_1}$ is the quantity that appears in Newton's gravitational law: $F_g=Gm_{...
3
votes
2answers
78 views

Force against mg when block is connected to rod and held horizontally

In the image attached, what would be the force that would balance out the gravitational force $mg$? The block is also not accelerating downwards so there should be some force acting on the block to ...
-1
votes
1answer
22 views

External and internal resistance to airflow

If an aircraft was travelling at 100mph an hole was opened to allow 100mph into the cabin,then the airflow is feed into an amplifier like a ramjet and the airflow out of the ramjet was increased to ...
5
votes
4answers
152 views

Rotating the bucket in circular motion without spilling water

In the bucket experiment when the bucket reaches the top of the circle why will it have a normal force acting on the water downwards? Doesn't normal force oppose any other force? There is no force ...
34
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7answers
6k views

Supergun Launching of Satellites

I should say first that I don't believe this is a feasible launch method, otherwise NASA and other space agencies would be using it by now. It's based on this BBC news story Saddam Hussein's Supergun ...
0
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1answer
49 views

Double Integrals of Force

I took AP Physics C and Multivariable Calculus last year, and noticed something interesting. For non-relativistic particles in one dimension:$$F=\frac{\partial p}{\partial t}=\frac{\partial E}{\...
1
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1answer
40 views

What kind of damping is this $F = -ax|x'|$?

From Applied Mathematics by Logan: A mass hanging on a spring is <...> governed by $$mx'' = -ax|x'| - kx$$ where $-ax|x'|$ is a nonlinear damping force. I looked up "nonlinear damping" ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Why does a bungee jumper continue to move downwards beyond the equilibrium position of the jumper and cord?

When a bungee jumper jumps, ignoring the mass of the bungee cord, the jumper initially falls in freefall before an inelastic collision occurs between the jumper and cord, and the cord extends as the ...
0
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2answers
50 views

Balancing Orthogonal Forces on 2D plane with arbitrary placement [closed]

I have a rectangular block in the xy plane with the center of mass that acts in the z direction at an arbitrary place in the plane. I also have 4 legs that support this weight underneath the block. ...
1
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2answers
14 views

Difference in Energy Transfer Between Impacts and Nudges [closed]

Say I have a table and I want to produce a vibration in the table. Would I be better off impacting the surface of the table (i.e. smacking the table) or nudging the surface (i.e. leaning on the ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

Raising a cut on your arm above your heart

I often read that when you have a deep cut on your arm, you should raise your arm to the point where the cut is above your heart. This should reduce the amount of blood loss because less blood reaches ...
3
votes
1answer
62 views

Height formula of a sphere inside a pipe

I have a pipe with a ball inside it and a blowing air through it. Look this image: The air is blowing in the direction of $F_a$. $F_a$ Is the air force and $P$ is the weight force. What I want ...
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0answers
60 views

Does a ball bearing cause bigger tides than the moon?

As per the answer to this question it is suggested the relative tidal pull of objects of equal angular area is equal to their relative density. Which lead me to the click-baity question: Does a ball ...
3
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0answers
49 views

Why is diproton unstable? [duplicate]

Diproton is an isotope of helium without any neutrons. It commonly forms in the Sun, where protons are fused constantly. However, it is extremely unstable, and will revert back to two protons almost ...
1
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3answers
45 views

How is rotational torque calculated when a force is applied uniformly over a surface?

Currently, the formula I am using to calculate the rotational torque applied onto an axis is $T = Fr\sin \theta$, where $T$ is the torque (in $\mathrm{N\ m}$), $F$ is the force acting, $r$ is the ...