The quantitative study of how fluids (gases and liquids) move.

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382 views

The pressure in a water spout and Bernoulli's equation

This is a conceptual question about the application of Bernoulli's equation to a water spout. There is a classical problem found in many physics texts which goes something like "you have a garden ...
4
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3answers
437 views

What do mathematicians mean by Navier Stokes existence and smoothness problem?

I still don't know what mathematicians mean by Navier-Stokes existence and smoothness. Since there is a reward for proving it, it seems important to them. (in past several months I've read online ...
3
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1answer
938 views

How do we calculate the speed of an air bubble rising in water?

We all know that an gas bubble expands as it rises through a liquid due to decreasing pressure.But at what speed does it rise? if we make a bubble of unit volume filled with a gas of given density at ...
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1answer
210 views

Dynamic simulation of surface tension [closed]

Is there any substantial body of work in physics on dynamically simulating effects of surface tension on liquids? The texts i found so far on fluid dynamics all seem to ignore surface tension, ...
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0answers
77 views

What is the domain of validity of the Omega equation?

The Omega eqation is used in meteorology for estimate the value of the vertical velocity. Considering that the horizontal velocity field and density is given by observation. Under which condition ...
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1k views

How to calculate the velocity of fluid at the outlet when density and the pressure drop are known?

I have a U- like pipe. Its inlet has atmospheric pressure $p_o=10^{5} \, Pa$. Vacuum is applied to the other end with a pressure gradient $\nabla p_v=-30 \cdot 10^{3} \, kPa/s$. The total time of the ...
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1answer
97 views

Object submerged in a fluid

1)A sphere of a given mass is put in a non viscous liquid. The sphere is released, and it moves down in the liquid. My doubt is, is the mechanical energy of the system decreasing? The answer given in ...
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1answer
90 views

Integral related to particle diffusion

In the context of particle diffusion, I am trying to understand the equations that describe Brownian motion as a macroscopic process. Assume $N(x,t)$ is a number concentration and $D$ is a diffusion ...
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2answers
105 views

In turbulence theory, what happens if i take space average of fluctuating part?

According to Reynolds decomposition, velocity field is split into two time average and fluctuating parts: $$u_{({\bf x},t)}=\overline u_{(\bf x)}+u'_{({\bf x},t)}$$ we know that time average of ...
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208 views

Ball jumping from water

Few days ago I played with ball(filled with air) in swimming pool. I observed interesting phenomenon. When I released a ball from 3 meters depth the ball barely jumped above the water surface but ...
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1answer
134 views

Fluids in thermodynamic equlibrium

I am reading about the Euler Equations of Fluid dynamics from Leveque's numerical methods for conservation laws. After introducing the mass, momentum and energy equations, some thermodynamic ...
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52 views

Outflow for fluid simulation based on “Stable Fluids”

I've implemented a fluid simulation based on the paper Stable Fluids. It works quite well, except I would like to have the velocity at the "upper" edge just to outflow and not to re-enter on the ...
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1answer
512 views

Pressure in Bernoulli's equation

! I've been reading an introductory physics textbook. It has a chapter on fluids which I'm finding quite confusing. Specifically, I don't understand the meaning of the pressure terms $P_0$ and $P_1$ ...
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276 views

How would you swim in inviscid water?

The viscosity of water creates drag on swimmer's body so its effect is to slow down the swimmer. However the viscosity seems to be essential for pushing the water backwards by the swimmer's arms and ...
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0answers
92 views

virtual air-surface temperature difference above a water body

I'm trying to work through the equations for the following paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2009JD012839/abstract and am trying to understand the concept of virtual air temperature, ...
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1answer
79 views

Is this the reason solids suspended in turbulent fluids don't settle?

While I know (and can observe) that solids don't settle easily in a turbulent flow, I struggle with understanding why exactly this is the case. Here' my problem: Conceptually, turbulence means high ...
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1answer
149 views

Navier-Stokes - Complete set under turbulent eddy viscosity hypothesis

I'm looking for the complete set (x,y,z component) of the Navier-Stoke equations under the Eddy Viscosity hypothesis to model turbulent fluid flow. I found the following, but I have a really hard ...
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1answer
69 views

How do we measure mean part or time average of velocity field?

How do we measure mean part or time average of a (known) velocity field? In other words, if I know velocity field how can I measure its time average or mean part? What is time average in general?
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1answer
656 views

Why is pressure gradient assumed to be constant with respect to radius in the derivation of Poiseuille's Law?

Poiseuille's Law relies on the fact that velocity is not constant throughout a cross-section of the pipe (it is zero at the boundary due to the no-slip condition and maximum in the center). By ...
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1answer
659 views

What is the Coandă effect? How is it defined, and what causes it?

Can anybody explain to me the Coandă effect well? I am finding that many definitions and explanations conflict. I am particularly confused about the following points regarding the Coandă effect: ...
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1answer
531 views

What are the limitations of Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics?

I've been excited by some of the possibilities of Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). I have seen some very exciting demonstrations of their use in 3D graphics, but I am wondering how well the ...
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1answer
127 views

Power in hydraulic analogy

In hydraulic analogy one compares electrical circuits with water circuits. For the electric case the formula $P = U \cdot I$ for the electric power holds. The analogous formula for water flow would ...
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2answers
904 views

How does a sponge “suck” up water against gravity?

If I take a sponge and place it in a shallow dish of water (i.e. water level is lower than height of sponge), it absorbs water until the sponge is wet, including a portion of the sponge above the ...
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1answer
108 views

Acceleration of a steady line vortex

In a question, I have to find the acceleration of a fluid parcel in a steady line vortex. I am given that $u_\theta=\frac{A_0}{r}$. So for a steady line vortex, the parcels are following circular ...
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1answer
154 views

Lorentz force for electrically conducting fluid flow in homogeneous magnetic field

I am mathematician and have paper which models situation when homogeneous magnetic field is applied to moving electrically conducting fluid. There is such Lorentz force formula on which all the work ...
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2answers
296 views

Addes mass forces: can a force depend on acceleration?

My friend and I had a little discussion about added mass forces. I always interpreted "F=ma" as a cause-effect relationship, so I find rather uneasy to accept that the cause can instantaneously ...
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1answer
354 views

How to calculate flow rate from given stream function

I am stuck on a homework question, all because I dozed off in class. I understand what a stream function is but I don't know how to apply it to calculate the flow in pretty much anything. Here's the ...
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0answers
54 views

Modeling the formation of a stellar system and matter accretion

I am trying to figure out what do I need to know to properly simulate the creation of a solar system from a particle cloud with random distribution of hydrogen atoms. Being more of a programming ...
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1answer
93 views

Can convection cells evolve in stably stratified fluid?

Assume stably stratified fluid but not in equilibrium, e.g. with non-constant temperature gradient for example. Can convection cells be present? Typical example of convection cells is Rayleigh–Bénard ...
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3answers
2k views

What about negative Pressure?

Here is something I see : Let's say the ideal fluid(water here) of density $\rho$ is drawn from a source by a motor and thrown upwards with a velocity $v$. Now we take the power of motor be ...
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2answers
708 views

Is the meander ratio of a river $= \pi$?

To get from point $A$ to $B$, a river will take a path that is $\pi$ times longer than as the crow flies (I think this result is from Einstein). What is the proof of this, and how well does it hold ...
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135 views

How to find outflow pressure/force of air through a pipe

I have been trying to find the correct method for determining the outflow force resulting from a certain amount of air being forced into a pipe of a certain dimension. Essentially i'm trying to ...
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1answer
393 views

rate of flow out of a reservoir

A reservoir contains a fluid, and there is an aperture at the bottom through which the fluid flows out as shown in the illustration: I understand that the rate of flow is based on at least these ...
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1answer
125 views

Ducted or open fluid flow, which is best for aerodynamics and lift

I'm designing a copter and trying to decide if the propellers should be ducted or open axial flow. I've read some theory on ducted and open air flow but I can't find any where that compares the two. I ...
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2answers
272 views

How do we measure velocity field?

How do we measure velocity field u(r,t)? i know that how to measure ordinary velocity. $v=\frac{dr}{dt}$ but what about velocity field? what is difference between them?
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1answer
734 views

Why doesn't a bus blow due to internal pressure?

When one travels in a bus, if he's sitting at any window, he will feel that the air is coming inside. If someone is standing at the open door of the bus, he'll also feel that the air is coming ...
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1answer
133 views

Why is there no UV catastrophe (divergence) in turbulence?

I have just read that as the Reynolds number is increased, the separation of macroscopic and microscopic scales increases and that this also means that there is no UV catastrophy (or equivalently UV ...
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1answer
129 views

What is the minimum pressure difference for your ears to pop?

I'm assuming the answer to this largely varies from person to person. Assuming you could instantly change the pressure around your head by amount $\Delta p$, what is the minimum $\Delta p$ for your ...
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1answer
91 views

Distribution of pressure inside a capsule

How would pressure of an ideal gas be distributed over the inside of a capsule (a cylinder with semi-spheres on the ends)? What about the strain on the material? Is there a general formula for how ...
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2answers
213 views

Water draining from a height into the bottom of a reservoir

If I hang one 5 gal. Bucket directly above another, put a hole in the bottom of the upper bucket with a tube inserted just inside hanging all the way to the bottom of the lower bucket and fill the ...
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1answer
126 views

Absolute Viscosity of Water at certain temperatures

I just started my class on fluid mechanics. There's a problem that requires absolute viscosity $u$ of water at 25C. I looked up my table in the book and I only have it for water at 20C and 30C. I ...
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1answer
822 views

SHM of floating objects

If we consider an object undergoing who has an acceleration proportional to the displacement of the object, it is going simple harmonic motion. In terms of Newton's second law, this is $$ -\dfrac k ...
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1answer
1k views

What does the Reynolds Number of a flow represent physically?

What does the Reynolds Number of a flow represent physically? I am having trouble understanding the meaning and the utility of the Reynolds number for a certain flow, could someone please tell me how ...
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1answer
85 views

Water ripples and nonzero divergence

In 2-d, one ripple would mean the velocity of water particles move out radially forming a circular wavefront. The Navier Stokes equations say the divergence of velocity has to be zero, but this ...
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2answers
154 views

Pressure in fluids

Fluids exert hydrostatic pressure because their molecules hit each other or the immersed body, but why is that at a greater depth pressure is higher when molecules are the same ? Assume density of ...
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1answer
133 views

(How) Does A Vortex Speed Drainage?

When a sink drains it forms a vortex. Does that vortex speeds drainage. If yes, how does the vortex speed drainage? The only relevant thing I could find was an expensive article and a science fair ...
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0answers
52 views

What is the relationship between complex time singularities and UV fixed points?

In this paper it is described how the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum and the flatness (a measure for intermittency) are governed by the position of the (dominant) singularities of the solutions of ...
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3answers
797 views

How can I understand a Vortex Tube and its efficiency?

A Vortex Tube takes a pressurized input stream, most typically of a gas, and creates two output streams with a temperature differential. Apparently, it has been described as a Maxwell's Demon. Both ...
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1answer
208 views

Finding Surface Tension of water at certain Temperature and Pressure

So the question is: Using the Young-Laplace Equation (if applicable), find the surface tension (dynes/cm) for water at 20 degrees Celsius with 2.5 psi. Round to the nearest tenth. ...
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533 views

Can Increasing the Turbulence Inside a Pipeline Economically Increase Flow?

"The velocity gradient in turbulent flows is steeper close to the wall and less steep in the center of the pipe than it is for laminar flows (Blatt p.97)." Does this mean that some degree of ...