The quantitative study of how fluids (gases and liquids) move.

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181 views

Why is there no UV catastrophe (divergence) in turbulence?

I have just read that as the Reynolds number is increased, the separation of macroscopic and microscopic scales increases and that this also means that there is no UV catastrophy (or equivalently UV ...
4
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1answer
66 views

Passively moving air [closed]

I'm interested in channeling air into an underground condenser to generate water. Which of these approaches would be most appropriate, and is there a better approach I haven't considered? A: A ...
3
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1answer
53 views

What's the difference between “Ohmic dissipation”, “Joule heating”, “ion drag” and “resistive heating”?

The following terms are sometimes used to refer to ... more or less ... the same thing by different people and in different contexts (electronic circuits vs. plasma physics, etc.): Ohmic ...
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1answer
19 views

Bubbly Flow and two phase flow modelling

When we pour vine or some other drink why bubbles move upward and what law they follow or what is the law that describe that motion? One other question If we consider a simple two phase flow between ...
2
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1answer
48 views

Reynolds number of airfoil in a pipe

As part of a physics high school paper I am writing, I need to build a wind tunnel. As part of my calculations, it appears that Reynolds number is very relevant in aerodynamics (specifically for ...
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0answers
24 views

What is the viscous force acting on a cube?

I'm aware of the viscous drag formulae to calculate the drag force acting on a moving sphere inside a viscous fluid. But how do you improve the formulae to get the force acting on a cube with side ...
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2answers
6k views

How do you calculate vortex shedding frequency?

I am attempting to try to find out if there is any effect of Von Karman vortices on a group of wind speed readings where it is presumed that due to a mountain nearby the data collection spot Von ...
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4answers
1k views

When pressure is exerted on parallel hydraulic pistons, do they start extending at the same time?

If there are two hydraulic cylinders connected in parallel, each with a different load (shown in the picture below), will they start extending at the same time? I'm having a disagreement with my ...
6
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1answer
2k views

Drag on a spinning ball in fluid

I am a physics newbie (high school level) and I am wondering what happens when a spherical object is spinning on the spot in a bunch of gas (no gravity here, just an imaginary physics sandbox). Am I ...
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1answer
37 views

Fluids in motion and pressure

We are taught in the lessons of fluid mechanics that for an ideal non compressible and non viscous fluid $at-rest$, the pressure at any point within the fluid is independent of the direction. But I ...
2
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1answer
41 views

Unsmooth behavior of water waves

I happened to come across this rather interesting picture of a very deformed (or perhaps intricate) wave. The structure looks like it illustrates a superposition of multiple waveforms, as intuitively ...
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3answers
10k views

About an upside down cup of water against atmosphere pressure

There is an experiment we learned from high school that demonstrated how atmosphere pressure worked. Fill a cup of water and put a cardboard on top of it, then turn it upside-down, the water will not ...
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2answers
45 views

What is the physical meaning of $v\times n$?

What is the physical meaning of $v\times n$, where $v$ is a velocity vector and and $n$ is a unit normal vector of a interface? Why at the free surface between two fluids, $$v^{(1)}\times ...
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1answer
49 views

Why does plugging a hole in an airplane's fuselage result in a huge (10x) atmospheric pressure spike?

While reading about uncontrolled decompression, I came across one famous airline incident, Aloha Airlines Flight 243, where the article I was reading discussed a 1-square-foot hole created in the ...
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4answers
198 views

What is the friction force at terminal velocity?

As terminal velocity is inversely proportional to viscosity or fluid friction, then my question is: at terminal velocity, the fluid friction is maximum or zero?
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2answers
45 views

Using fluid mechanics to show that force is directly proportional to velocity

So I am writing a paper about viscous dampers in harmonic oscilators, however I was looking at some old fluid mechanic notes and I thought I had come across what I needed although I have gotten stuck. ...
0
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1answer
40 views

How to make a structure of which water flows out at a constant rate? [closed]

Is there any way to make a structure of which water flows out of at a constant rate? Any way could be used to build the structure, including 3D printing.
4
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2answers
267 views

Fluid flow: Force acting on the fluid and the Navier-Stokes equation

Consider a one dimensional fluid flow in a rectangular tube. Typical streams are the poiseuille streams. Consider the case in wich we apply a force on the fluid. The Navier-Stokes equation (for ...
2
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3answers
180 views

Distance traveled by a water jet

I helped my kid in a science fair project, where we punctured holes in a water bottle at various heights and then measured the distance traveled by the water jets before they hit the ground. The ...
0
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1answer
10k views

Calculation of pressure from flow rate of water

Anybody kindly help me to find how to calculate pressure in bar from flow rate. I have a pipe and from that I am transferring water at a constant flow rate of 5ml/min. At this flow rate, with a 0.5 cm ...
0
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1answer
27 views

Monoatomic fluids and free space around atoms

In monoatomic fluids the atoms can move quite freely around each other. Is there any thermodynamic/statistical mechanic equation how much free space there is between the atoms? This has to be ...
7
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0answers
142 views

Could Navier-Stokes equation be derived directly from Boltzmann equation?

I know how to derive Navier-Stokes equations from Boltzmann equation in case where bulk and viscosity coefficients are set to zero. I need only multiply it on momentum and to integrate it over ...
41
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5answers
14k views

How effective is speeding?

At a simple level, speeding in a car attempts to minimize the time required to travel a distance by utilizing the basic relationship: $$d=st$$ So for a given distance, time should be inversely ...
2
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1answer
80 views

Boat Hull Drag in Shallow Water

I paddle several different types of small craft in the ocean and bays near my home. One phenomenon I've observed is beyond my understanding of drag on a narrow displacement hull. When paddling in ...
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2answers
69 views

Do rotating non-circular projectiles also experience Magnus lift?

The Magnus effect has been studied on spherical projectiles such as golf balls, tennis balls, and soccer balls. The backspin of a golf ball leads to Magnus lift that opposes gravity, thus allowing the ...
3
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1answer
87 views

Is Archimedes' principle valid with moving objects?

I was solving a classic application of Archimedes' principle: a body partially submerged that is made to oscillate vertically and perform a simple harmonic oscillations. The equations turn out to be ...
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1answer
114 views

Can an air bubble in a liquid be faster than its terminal velocity

The title says it pretty much. I am wondering if an air bubble in a liquid can move faster (relative to the surrounding liquid) than its terminal velocity?
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3k views

Is there an analytical solution for fluid flow in a square duct?

I couldn't find one but assumed it must exist. Tried to find it on the back of an envelope, but got to an ugly differential equation I can't solve. I'm assuming a square duct of infinite length, ...
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2answers
75 views

What is the pressure of falling water?

Imagine a breaking wave 10m high. The wave breaks onto a beach. What is the maximum pressure created by the wave on the beach, ignoring effects such as might be cause by air?
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1answer
47 views

Limits for the linear wave equation

In acoustics and continuum mechanics the following wave equation (for Speed of Sound $c$) for the pressure field $p$ is well-known: $\partial_t \partial_t p = c^2 \Delta p$. This wave equation can be ...
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2answers
97 views

Ice when melted at zero gravity [closed]

I wish to know the behavior of ice at zero gravity, how ice will behave when melted at g=0? Thanks
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3answers
5k views

Is this really a golden ratio spiral?

In this blog post, I found this picture: There are other similar photos: and Does the water really form golden ratio spiral in such cases? Or is the photo just a provocative example, without ...
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2answers
65 views

How to increase flow rate? [closed]

I am coming up with ideas of how to increase grain (corn, soybeans etc,) flow in a tube. My first idea is to have spiral ribs inside of the tube to create a vortex effect that will allow the grain to ...
2
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4answers
3k views

What is the principle behind centrifugation?

What is the principle behind centrifugation? I understand the idea that you spin something around the centripetal force will cause an apparent force on the spinning system. However I don't quite ...
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0answers
28 views

Are centrifugal fans subject to triboelectric effects, and if so can the increase in charge be predicted and measured?

A centrifugal blower is a device that moves gas, usually under power of an electric motor. The blower housing and impeller may be metallic, but often are made of plastic materials. My question is ...
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1answer
125 views

Vorticity versus Viscosity

For a work project I need to revive my aerodynamics knowledge again. Can somebody help me with the distinction between vorticity and viscosity. If a flow vorticity is not equal to zero, the flow is ...
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0answers
29 views

Are there any in depth superfluid mechanic analyses of spacetime?

Has there been much work done that treats particles as vortexes in a fluid, or dark matter as bubbles in this fluid (bending space in the same way massive particles (vortexes) are observed to do, but ...
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2answers
51 views

Does air density influence a football player's ability to “bend” the ball?

Whilst reading an article on nasa.gov, there was a claim that I found interesting: At higher altitudes, the density r is lower producing a larger radius of curvature and a straighter path. The ...
146
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9answers
23k views

What really allows airplanes to fly?

What aerodynamic effects actually contribute to producing the lift on an airplane? I know there's a common belief that lift comes from the Bernoulli effect, where air moving over the wings is at ...
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0answers
27 views

Fluid approximation for inflaton?

In cosmology there is a widely used fluid approximation which applies when the mean free path is very small compared to the scale of observation and then all the properties of stress energy tensor can ...
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0answers
55 views

Why do clouds not fall? [duplicate]

The density difference between the clouds and the atmosphere favours the clouds to fall. Why don't they?
0
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1answer
28 views

Calculate the pressure required to stop a pipette (or pipe) from dripping [closed]

Suppose that I have a pipette with a length of 10 cm that is filled with water, with a diameter of 1 cm. If it is held vertically, how would I calculate the pressure required to stop any water from ...
1
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1answer
34 views

Change in radius of a charged bubble

I was thinking about what'd happen to the radius of a bubble, if a charge is uniformly distributed over it. At the beginning, I thought that the bubble would expand, for sure, because of the ...
6
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2answers
137 views

Foam patterns on espresso

When just prepared, an espresso has a thin layer of foam, known as crema, on its surface. As I move my drink from the bar to a table, the motion destroys the homogeneity of the layer, but I've noticed ...
2
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1answer
40 views

Is, in terms of sound, pouring water in a bottle the analogous of blowing into it?

When we pour some liquid in a closed container, for instance a jar or a bottle, we usually hear two (acoustical) noises: one is the classical turbulent (I guess white) noise, that in my view is ...
1
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1answer
55 views

Why Benard cells are usually hexagonal?

Solution of equations of convection (hydrodynamics equations in Boussinesq approximation) involves existence of convective cells, so-called Benard cells. They are represented by superposition of ...
0
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1answer
35 views

Amount of unknown parameters in compressible Euler equations

I'm looking at this page for the compressible Euler equations. To me it seems, in the 1-dimensional case, there should be 3 unknowns: density, velocity, and pressure. This is because the energy $E$ ...
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1answer
68 views

Variance and Intermittency in turbulence

In the turbulent transport of a scalar field, $\Phi$, decomposed into mean and fluctuating components, $\Phi=\left<\Phi\right>+\phi^\prime$, the scalar variance is defined as ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Tank draining with piston

I am trying to solve a problem which is close to the tank draining (as here Fuel tank draining) but with a piston a the top of the tank which means $p_A$ different of $p_B$. I search the velocity ...