The quantitative study of how fluids (gases and liquids) move.

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Cascade in relativistic turbulence

The Kolmogorov theory of turbulence indicates an energy cascade in turbulence. Is there a corresponding version of relativistic fluid?
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1answer
3k views

Why exactly does a boomerang return back to the thrower?

I was always intrigued by the phenomena that govern the returning back of a boomerang to the thrower. Even if it is dependent on various factors such as velocity, aerodynamics, wind resistance and ...
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5answers
10k views

What about negative Pressure?

Here is something I see : Let's say the ideal fluid(water here) of density $\rho$ is drawn from a source by a motor and thrown upwards with a velocity $v$. Now we take the power of motor be ...
9
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1answer
488 views

Why does a transformation to a rotating reference frame NOT break temporal scale invariance?

Naively, I thought that transforming a scale invariant equation (such as the Navier-Stokes equations for example) to a rotating reference frame (for example the rotating earth) would break the ...
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4answers
5k views

Does irrotational imply inviscid?

Let us consider a 2D irrotational flow, such that $\nabla\times\boldsymbol u =\boldsymbol 0$. Defining the stream function such that $\boldsymbol u =\nabla\times\psi \boldsymbol n$ where $\boldsymbol ...
7
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1answer
4k views

Drag on a spinning ball in fluid

I am a physics newbie (high school level) and I am wondering what happens when a spherical object is spinning on the spot in a bunch of gas (no gravity here, just an imaginary physics sandbox). Am I ...
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3answers
955 views

Addes mass forces: can a force depend on acceleration?

My friend and I had a little discussion about added mass forces. I always interpreted $F=ma$ as a cause-effect relationship, so I find rather uneasy to accept that the cause can instantaneously ...
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2answers
1k views

Hydrostatic pressure on a teapot spout

The phenomenon where water flows on the outside side of a teapot spout is named "The teapot effect", and occurs due to a difference in pressure between water and the atmosphere. Consider the image of ...
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2answers
2k views

Shape of Fan Blades

How is the shape of the blades of an air fan determined? Trial and error, or is there a theory behind it? What are they trying to maximize, volume of air dislocated per rotation?
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1answer
160 views

Transport theorem derivation question

I am trying to rigorously go through some fluid mechanics proofs and theorems. I am currently going through a proof related to the transport theorem and I am having trouble with a step. The steps in ...
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2answers
3k views

Is Magnus effect a corollary of Bernoulli principle?

Magnus effect is commonly explained using Bernoulli principle. However, taking the lift on a rotating cylinder as an example, the velocity difference is caused by the extra work done by the rotating ...
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3answers
3k views

How much lift does an airplane get from its wings, vs the rest of the airframe?

Consider a big commercial airliner, like a 727, 747, or a 787. At cruising altitude, under standard conditions, how much of the lift of the aircraft comes from the wings, and how much from the rest ...
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1answer
236 views

Explicit form of the entropy production in hydrodynamics

I'm trying to understand how hydrodynamics arise from a precise, mathematical formulation of thermodynamics, learning mostly from Landau's "Hydrodynamics". So Landau starts from formulating the ...
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4answers
5k views

Why does smoke go out the window of the car - and what if there's wind blowing instead of the car moving?

When driving a car while smoking with the window open (safety and legal issues aside), I've noticed that the smoke tends to go outside the window. Why does the smoke go outside? If the car is ...
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5answers
392 views

Navier-Stokes system

I have to study this system which name is Navier-Stokes. Can you explain please what means that $p$, $u$ and $(u \cdot \nabla)u$. What represents in reality? Tell me please, how should I read the ...
18
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2answers
989 views

How deep is the Great Red Spot?

The Great Red Spot (GRS) is a very persistent storm system that's easily visible through a telescope on the surface of Jupiter. But what is the three-dimensional structure of the GRS, and how deep ...
17
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6answers
493 views

Do gases have phonons?

A phonon is a quantized unit of sound; they are encountered when quantizing lattice vibrations in solids. Now, even an ideal gas supports sound waves, but in such a case, interactions between atoms ...
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2answers
5k views

Whistle Physics

I'm looking for a simple explanation of how a whistle operates. I know that forcing air over a sharp lip can set up a wave in a resonating cavity, but how? "Most whistles operate due to a feedback ...
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3answers
2k views

How to prevent water droplets becoming larger on the tip of a nozzle?

I use an ordinary syringe to generate a single water droplet. However, it is not usually able to make a droplet smaller than 1 mm (because of surface tension forces, inner diameter of needle, etc.) ...
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3answers
613 views

Why $\log \rho$ in the continuity equation?

I just saw the continuity equation, in a manuscript, written as $$\frac{\partial \log \rho }{\partial t} + \vec v \cdot \nabla \log \rho= - \nabla \cdot \vec v.$$ Now, just calculating the derivatives ...
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2answers
2k views

How do I calculate the Reynolds number in multiphase flows?

I am modeling a gas flowing through a liquid. How do I calculate the Reynolds number in multiphase flows? And, at what Reynolds number should I consider the flow to be turbulent? The problem is of a ...
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3answers
1k views

Would a perfectly clean and perfectly smooth champagne glass have no bubbles?

My understanding is that nucleation sites for bubbles in a champagne glass are either due to defects in the glass or due to fibers in the glass. (See this article for details on that statement.) Does ...
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3answers
13k views

Why does the water level equalize in a series of tubes?

Say I have a series of tubes (not the internet) looking like this, where w represents water: ...
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2answers
1k views

Why does a container with fluid make different sounds at different fluid levels?

Have you ever noticed that when you are filling a container with fluid. As it approaches the top, it makes a different sound? You can tell by listening when your about to reach the top. Why is this?
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1answer
530 views

Viscosity/Entropy ratio and unitary evolution in quantum gravity

Calculations of the shear viscosity of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), observed in heavy ions collisions, are performed via the AdS/CFT correspondence [ref1]. One finds that the shear viscosity of the ...
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1answer
1k views

Deriving shallow water equations from Euler's equations

I would like to derive the one-dimensional shallow water equations from Eulers's equations. This works perfectly for the conservation of mass. Especially the meaning of the longitudinal fluid ...
6
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1answer
648 views

What causes the structure visible in first few milliseconds of a nuclear explosion?

Following on from this question, here is a high-speed photograph of a nuclear explosion, taken about 1 ms after detonation: (source) As anna v pointed out, several similar images can be seen in a ...
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0answers
128 views

Is drag force on an oscillating sphere an effective model for a swimmer?

I saw the latest video from Sixty Symbols Little Swimmers. At the end of the videos he says that we do not know how to calculate the movement of the little swimmers. He says(6:14-6:40 in video) that ...
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4answers
2k views

How does a converging-diverging nozzle not violate conservation of energy?

Disclaimer: I know absolutely nothing about fluid dynamics, and very little about physics in general. THis may be a really dumb question. Now, at subsonic speeds, converging and diverging nozzles ...
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3answers
159 views

How do shock waves form in space?

Today my aerodynamics professor mentioned that the equations we were learning for atmospheric shock waves can also be applied by astrophysicists to study black hole-related shock waves in space. How ...
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2answers
15k views

Flow of liquid among branches

If water is flowing through big pipe is branched into 4 branches of small pipe. Lets say the flow is around 4 m/sec. I have the following questions: What will be the flow rate in each of the pipes?...
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3answers
2k views

How much heat from a fire actually warms your home?

A fire in a hearth disperses heat to, I guess, three places: the bricks of the chimney out the hearth (where the person tending the fire is standing) out the chimney, above the house How would you ...
4
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2answers
367 views

The demise of the Tacoma Narrows bridge was casused by aeroelastic flutter. But isn't that just a special case of resonance?

Much of the research I've done on the Tacoma Narrows bridge disaster of 1940 attribute the collapse of the bridge due to aeroelastic flutter - not strucural resonance. But isn't aeroelastic flutter ...
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1answer
469 views

Fuel tank draining [closed]

A cylindrical fuel tank is being drained from the bottom as in this picture : Conservation of flow rate : $v_A = \frac{S_B}{S_A}v_B = \alpha v_B$ Assuming that $z_B = 0$, Bernoulli's theorem ...
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3answers
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Why should fluids be confined for Pascal's Law to be applicable

When is Pascal's law about fluid pressure propagation applicable? Is it applicable to a closed circular pipe with a pump rotating the fluid, but not to a tub of water. Most statements require only ...
3
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1answer
1k views

Some hints/introductions/textbooks for LBM (Lattice Boltzmann methods) fluid simulation?

I come from a computer science background and I want to learn details about LBM in fluid simulation. I have been searching around for a concise tutorial that tells me how LBM is used to solve a ...
3
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1answer
7k views

How far will water squirt out from a hole in a can?

Say you have a bottle of water filled up to a height H. A small hole is drilled in its side at a height d, so that water squirts out. The squirting water travels in an arc as it falls, covering some ...
2
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1answer
274 views

Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution for transport equations

I have to calculate the transport coefficients for the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. But I'm not sure what distribution I have to use. As far as I know it should not be the MB distribution for $v$-...
2
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1answer
80 views

Fluid filled open container in space/vacuum

I have water in a bottle, as I open it in space(or vacuum for that case ). From what I have read in books the water will instantly vapourize,as the vapour pressure of the water inside, far exceeds the ...
2
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3answers
2k views

What is the velocity area method for estimating the flow of water?

Can anyone explain to me what the Velocity Area method for measuring river or water flow is? My guess is that the product of the cross sectional area and the velocity of water flowing in a pipe is ...
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4answers
4k views

Capillary tube of insufficient length

I was wondering if we have a very thin glass tube placed in a tub of liquid and the portion of the tube outside the liquid is lesser than the height to which the liquid can rise because of capillarity,...
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2answers
850 views

Finding an equation relating the mass of a blade of a wind turbine to its velocity

I'm writing up my physics coursework and I thought I'd try and find an equation described in the title. This is my attempt: Is it correct?
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2answers
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Velocity with respect to time in Torricelli's Law

I am having a bit of difficulty establishing the efflux velocity of an open tank of water in terms of time, i.e. $u(t)$, according to Torricelli's law. I know that for a known height $h$ (where $h = ...
0
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1answer
85 views

Properties of Fluids-theoritical confusion

I am having a very basic confusion on how we calculate the height of atmosphere when we assume that the density does not change with altitude(density remains 1.29 kg/m$^3$). I want to know why we say ...
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1answer
230 views

Metric inside a sphere of uniform density?

Is an exact solution to Einstein's Field Equations known for the interior of a sphere of uniform density (to approximate a star or planet, for example?)
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3answers
1k views

How does liquid in a ball affect its rotational acceleration down a ramp?

Suppose we have a shell with mass $M$ and radius $R$. If we let that roll without slipping down a ramp of angle theta to the horizontal, we can easily find the acceleration of the shell the instant ...
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3answers
288 views

What does the quantification of causes and effect look like, for clouds in offshore wind turbine wakes?

At Horns Rev windfarm off the coast of Denmark, sometimes in winter, clouds appears in the wake of the turbines. I've only seen photos of the phenomenon when the wind direction is exactly aligned with ...
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4answers
6k views

Effect of water pressure on sinking objects

As I understand, water pressure increases as we go towards bottom of the ocean. So if an object* is thrown into water and it starts sinking with some speed, does the sinking object's acceleration ...
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3answers
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Why does pressure act as a source for the gravitational field?

I'm asking for a qualitative explanation if there is one. My own answer doesn't work. I would have guessed it's because when a gas has pressure the kinetic energy adds to the rest mass of a given ...
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1answer
134 views

How are the turbulent spectra determined in relativistic turbulence?

In a non-relativistic compressible fluid, the turbulent energy spectra are well-understood and appear to follow the Kolmogorov hypothesis. It would also appear that relativistic turbulence also ...