The quantitative study of how fluids (gases and liquids) move.

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Lagrangian Coordinates in Fluid Flow

I apologize if this is not the right place to ask this question: I am currently reading a paper by Y. Brenier, where for the fluid flow he introduces a Lagrangian label $a$ instead of the vertical ...
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How do we calculate the speed of an air bubble rising in water?

We all know that an gas bubble expands as it rises through a liquid due to decreasing pressure.But at what speed does it rise? if we make a bubble of unit volume filled with a gas of given density at ...
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189 views

How does a hinge affect the amount of a submerged material?

Suppose I have a rod that has a density of $X <1$. If I were to submerge that rod in water (density 1), I would expect $X$ of the rod to be below water and $1-X$ of it to be above water (simple ...
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40 views

What does centre of lift depend on?

I've read in many places that centre of lift is about quarter chord of the wing and that post-stall lift (the part developed on lower surface) has centre midchord. The later makes sense; the pressure ...
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46 views

Darcy Flow in porous material - consider porosity in cross-section area?

According to Darcy's Law, the volumetric flow rate Q of a fluid occuring due to a pressure difference $\Delta p$ over a distance L and through a cross-sectional area A of a porous medium (volume V) ...
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42 views

Integrating pressure over a surface

Consider the 2D airfoil below. In engineering (and maybe physics) you will often see something like the following as an expression for the pressure force acting on a surface (in this case a curve ...
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430 views

How do rudders work?

It is possible for a boat to use rudder to make a U-turn while coasting (moving by inertia), although it would lose some speed. How exactly do boats trade a portion of magnitude of the initial ...
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66 views

Calculation of pressure from flow rate of water

Anybody kindly help me to find how to calculate pressure in bar from flow rate. I have a pipe and from that I am transferring water at a constant flow rate of 5ml/min. At this flow rate, with a 0.5 cm ...
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20 views

Can pressure in bars be equated to flow in litres per second? [duplicate]

I have a 160 mm water pipe at 5 bar pressure.What is the flow in litres per sec? I want to fit a hydro turbine to the outlet.
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Festive physics: gold flake vodka

I have a bottle of vodka that has a load of gold flakes suspended in it. It has been sat still for over 24 hours and the flakes are all still suspended within the liquid: they have not risen to the ...
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72 views

Torque on a rotational cylinder in viscous fluid

I've been stuck on what I'm pretty sure is a simple part of a larger question. It's a cylinder (radius a) spinning in a viscous fluid. It's rotating at rate $\Omega$ .During this question we get that ...
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168 views

Analytical solution of transient barometric formula for fluid in one dimension

Consider a column of fluid of length $L$, with initial density $\rho_0$ and initial velocity ($u_0 =0$) everywhere. Now at time $t=0$ gravity is switched on. No-slip boundary conditions are assumed at ...
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How to estimate the time spending along the fluid flow

I have a 2d flow field with a singular point $$\dot x=y-px^2\\\dot y=-x-qy^3$$ where $p,q$ are small parameters. How do I compute the cost time of a particle from $(x_0,y_0)$ to ambient of the ...
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243 views

Finding Surface Tension of water at certain Temperature and Pressure

So the question is: Using the Young-Laplace Equation (if applicable), find the surface tension (dynes/cm) for water at 20 degrees Celsius with 2.5 psi. Round to the nearest tenth. ...
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84 views

Confused about the theoretical origin of quadratic air drag [duplicate]

Though the mathematical concepts underlying quadratic air drag are quite straightforward (a single variable differential, just like the linear drag equation), my text book (and online text books) ...
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Shallow water wave question from Acheson's book

I am learning Fluid mechanics by reading Acheson's book entitled "Elementary Fluid Dynamics". Below is from problem 3.1. Consider the Euler equation for an ideal fluid in the irrotational case. We ...
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78 views

What makes laminar cascade break?

Near my house there is a mall that have a cascade, which has a pratically constant flow, and doesn't seem to have perturbations (at least near the edge where water falls), between its two levels. ...
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Vanishing viscosity in eqn. of heat transfer for free convection: on what argument?

In Landau's and Lifshitz' Fluid Mechanics on the derivation of the equation of heat transfer for free convection p. 218, they write In the thermal conduction equation (50.2), the viscosity term ...
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640 views

Capillary tube of insufficient length

I was wondering if we have a very thin glass tube placed in a tub of liquid and the portion of the tube outside the liquid is lesser than the height to which the liquid can rise because of ...
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Steam Turbine Inlet Velocity

Consider an ideal steam turbine. The power generated by a steam turbine comes down to the torque and the angular velocity, which is ultimately dependent on the velocity at which the flow enters the ...
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69 views

Microscopic source of pressure in an incompressible fluid

The pressure of a fluid can be explained microscopically in terms of molecules bouncing off the walls of a container. The molecules have a certain mass and speed, so when they bounce they transfer a ...
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What is the difference between 'flow' and 'move'?

I just met with a very basic question.(Might even sound silly!) My textbook kinda says(not exactly), 'Whatever flows is a fluid'. That got me wondering because we are creating a whole category of ...
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160 views

How do I calculate the Reynolds number in multiphase flows?

I am modeling a gas flowing through a liquid. How do I calculate the Reynolds number in multiphase flows? And, at what Reynolds number should I consider the flow to be turbulent? The problem is of a ...
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Water under high pressure

If you were to sink a container to the bottom of a deep ocean and seal it there, then bring it up to the surface, would it retain its pressure? The answer for a gas is obviously yes, but what about ...
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104 views

Calculating Length Scales from Passive Scalar Field

I have a set of PLIF images of a passive scalar advected in a turbulent flow. I'm wondering if it's possible to estimate the integral length-scale based on the images of the passive scalar, and if ...
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Fluid flow at mach 1

fluid-dynamics is not my preferred discipline, yet I have been landed with this problem and just seeking some clarification. I have a nozzle at the end of a tube, with 8 holes in it, and we are going ...
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71 views

Force to stop a moving rope vs. stagnation pressure of a fluid

Let $\lambda$ be a linear density of a rope which is moving into a scale at velocity v. The additional force on the scale due to the collision is given as $\frac{d p}{d t} = v\frac{d m}{d t} = ...
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How laminar or turbulent is air?

Consider an outdoors scenario, with good weather and no sensible air currents at the floor level. How turbulent or laminar is the air surrounding this environment?
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96 views

Feynman's derivation of Bernoulli (part of it)

OK, so what's up with the $\Delta M$ here? I don't get it. In fact, my textbook doesn't even put it in. I don't think it is a type-o because he continues on with the explanation. If anything I got ...
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When water climbs up a piece of paper, where is the energy coming from?

Take a glass of water and piece of toilet paper. If you keep the paper vertical, and touch the surface of the water with the tip of the paper, you can see the water being absorbed and climbing up the ...
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How to show that the Coriolis effect is irrelevant for the whirl/vortex in the sink/bathtub?

There is a common myth that water flowing out from a sink should rotate in direction governed by on which hemisphere we are; this is shown false in many household experiments, but how to show it ...
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274 views

Can cannonballs go through water?

In the recent Spielberg/Jackson Tintin movie, there is a scene where Red Rackham and Captain Haddock's ships are fighting, and cannons are fired. The cannonball is shown at one point to go through a ...
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105 views

Freezing water in a closed container [duplicate]

We know that density of ice reduces by about 8% during freezing, this means it expands to have little higher volume. But if I fill water in a container (entire volume) which has very low coefficient ...
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Is this really a golden ratio spiral?

In this blog post, I found this picture: Does the water really form golden ratio spiral in such cases? Or is the photo just a provocative example, without physics grounds for claims about ...
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Calculate water flow rate through orifice

I'm not very good with fluid physics, and need some help. Imagine the following setup with water contained in-front of a wall with an opening on the bottom: How do I calculate the water flow $Q$?. ...
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382 views

Difference resultant aerodynamics force on an airfoil and a flat plate

From basic airfoil theory the following free body diagram can be determined for a two dimensional asymmetric airfoil: Here the direction of the resultant force is governed by the geometry of the ...
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136 views

Sum of forces with liquid in rotation

It's not homework (I'm teacher). I would like to compute sum of forces on this study : The shape is symmetrical like that I'm sure the center of gravity is in the center of the shape. I compute ...
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what is the static pressure in a yield stress fluid?

Suppose I have a tank filled and there is no slip at the walls. If the tank is filled with a Newtonian fluid and is in static equilibrium, we know that the pressure is defined as $p = \rho g z$. But ...
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140 views

Can a human body supercavitate to survive water impact?

Inspired by this analysis of a human (OK, Captain America) hitting water feet first at terminal velocity, I'm wondering if supercavitation would be possible and whether it would improve your chances ...
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Sea surfer position displacement

Waves are means by which the energy propagates through a medium (e.g., sea water). This is not associated with a net movement of water in the direction of wave propagation. If this is the case, then ...
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Shock speed in air/vacuum shock tube

Some of you are probably aware of What If, xkcd's blog about interesting physics problems. One episode, Glass Half Empty, concerns itself with what would happen if a glass of water is half water, ...
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Bernoulli's principle on a curve ball

I've seen a few excellent answers here on the Magnus force, which explains why balls with a spin will curve. However, my intuition is still telling me that the Bernoulli's principle would push it the ...
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Flow rate is calculated only using the parallel component of the velocity vector

Flow rate is calculated using only the parallel component of the velocity vector to the area vector. Why is this? How can I mathematically prove this? Namely, how do I prove any perpendicular ...
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Help with ideal gas law manipulation

Equation 1 represents an improvement over the intial assumption of constant mass velocity (i.e., $\rho v=\rho_o v_o$). We can now improve Eqn. (2) to get to Eqn. (3). My question is: what are the ...
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Sound Propagation using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) considering wind effects

I am trying to plot the propagation of sound from a fixed source in a 2D environment using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) Method taking into account the effects of the wind velocity. I came ...
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156 views

Pipe in a flowing river problem

I'm working on a certain problem in fluid mechanics, which isn't really my strongest area. The problem is as follows: Curved pipe is partially submerged in a flowing river so that one end is pointing ...
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Is there an analytical solution for fluid flow in a square duct?

I couldn't find one but assumed it must exist. Tried to find it on the back of an envelope, but got to an ugly differential equation I can't solve. I'm assuming a square duct of infinite length, ...
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What makes an abstract physical system describable by a “fluid” equations of motion?

We can describe (some of) the dynamics of many systems using fluid mechanics. Of course these include classical fluids like water, more exotic fluids like photon gases and the universe as a whole and ...
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Examples of nearly perfect fluids and gases

When learning for physics (hydrodynamics and gases) I wanted to know what would be examples of nearly perfect fluids (no surface effects and no friction) and perfect gases (only elastic collisions and ...
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Finding power with Drag Force equation

The mass of the car is 1500 kg. The shape of the body is such that its aerodynamic drag coefficient is $C_D=0.330$ and the frontal area is $2.50 m^2$. Assuming that the drag force is proportional to ...