1
vote
1answer
33 views

Effect of Reynolds number on wake region

For a flow over a smooth sphere, does the wake region increases with increase in Reynolds number? And if so, then why?
3
votes
0answers
49 views

What's the corresponding symmetry of enstrophy conservation?

In fluid mechanics, especially 2D turbulence study, people talk about conservation of enstrophy. But I can't really understand enstrophy very well, and what's the corresponding symmetry of enstrophy ...
7
votes
0answers
68 views

Could the phenomenon of vortex bursting be exploited to reduce wake turbulence?

One of the classic stories in the annals of aerospace engineering is the development (and subsequent redesign) of the F-18 and its Leading Edge Extensions (LEX) due to fatigue problems, problems that ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

How laminar or turbulent is air?

Consider an outdoors scenario, with good weather and no sensible air currents at the floor level. How turbulent or laminar is the air surrounding this environment?
3
votes
1answer
101 views

What is the physical application of Navier-Stokes existence and smoothness?

Recently, mathematician Mukhtarbay Otelbaev published a paper Existence of a strong solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, in which he claim that he solved one of the Millennium Problems: Existence ...
8
votes
2answers
174 views

How do I calculate the Reynolds number in multiphase flows?

I am modeling a gas flowing through a liquid. How do I calculate the Reynolds number in multiphase flows? And, at what Reynolds number should I consider the flow to be turbulent? The problem is of a ...
5
votes
2answers
74 views

Can we 'see' the Kolmogorv microscale

My understanding of Kolmogorov Microscale is that in a turbulent fluid, smaller eddies tend to be similiar to larger eddies - until you arrive at the microscale. My understanding (that may be wrong) ...
2
votes
1answer
35 views

Is the viscous sublayer size universal?

We know the non-dimensionalized distance of the viscous sub-layer is 5 wall units for a turbulent boundary layer. It is common to see this in Fluid Mechanics books but seems somewhat arbitrary. I ...
2
votes
0answers
51 views

Similarities between laminar-turbulence transition and others like BCS-BEC crossover, quark-hadron transition etc

From my limited readings on fluid dynamics, my understanding is that as the system changes from near-laminar flows to full turbulence, the dimensionless Reynolds number changes from $ R << 1$ to ...
3
votes
0answers
66 views

Kolmogorov/Energy spectrum for turbulent boundary layer

Previously, I have calculated energy spectrum for 3D isotropic turbulent flow data which is equally spaced in all three directions and then to compute the energy spectrum, one performs Fourier ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

Minimum amount of fluid to experience turbulence?

Turbulence is a challenge to model and simulate: "When I meet God, I am going to ask him two questions: Why relativity? And why turbulence? I really believe he will have an answer for the ...
4
votes
1answer
117 views

Water falling, why does it spin?

I have noticed that water, when falling will rotate. Looking closely at a thin stream from a faucet and placing a flat object mid stream you will see the water is rotating. The further down the stream ...
14
votes
1answer
243 views

How fast would a truck have to go to pull a pedestrian onto the road? [closed]

Let's suppose a pedestrian P is walking or standing next to a highway. Suppose a truck T will drive by the said pedestrian at speed V leaving distance L between the two. Assuming L is a reasonably ...
5
votes
2answers
117 views

Does vortex shedding exist along the surface of an object?

Vortex shedding occurs due to the detachment of flow. The typical example is for the oscillating wake behind a cylinder, and has a frequency related to the size of the object. I want to know, if a ...
1
vote
3answers
125 views

Does the equation of continuity hold for turbulent flows?

My textbook mainly deals with laminar flows. The book derives the equation of continuity, which states that the cross-sectional area times the velocity of a flow is always constant. But nowhere in the ...
-1
votes
1answer
74 views

How can a fly be in the space of a roofless car, get out of the car space and get back in while the car is driving at the speed of 80mph? [closed]

I was driving in a cabriolet car at the speed of 80mph, while a fly flew in and out of the frame of the car. My question is, How can the fly leave the frame and get back in? Is it possible that it ...
2
votes
3answers
124 views

Explain Turbulence [closed]

I'm a high school student. I still don't understand what turbulence is. Please can you explain what it really is? This is what I think it is: rotating motion of water when a particle travels at a ...
-2
votes
2answers
244 views

About how fast can a small fish swim before experiencing turbulent flow around its body? [closed]

About how fast can a small fish swim before experiencing turbulent flow around its body? An Engineering Problem! Please go through this question step by step. :D
0
votes
0answers
59 views

Noether's theorem in the realm of superfluids

In 1969 Keith Moffat showed helicity conservation for ideal fluids such as liquid Helium. This work is proving seminal in our understanding of turbulent flows and viscous fluids. In the case where ...
7
votes
1answer
153 views

Phase Space Flow

Phase space flow shares characteristics with fluid flow such as incompressibility by Liouville's theorem. Extending the similarities one might be curious, does phase space flow have a characteristic ...
0
votes
1answer
145 views

What is the apparent viscosity in shear thinning turbulent flow through a pipe? [duplicate]

The explanation of shear rate in laminar flow is straightforward: We imagine small layers of fluid that glide on each other. Now, in turbulent flow, this does not work as there are no layers. If I ...
4
votes
1answer
769 views

What's the shear rate in a turbulent flow?

The explanation of shear rate in laminar flow is straightforward: We imagine small layers of fluid that glide on each other. Now, in turbulent flow, this does not work as there are no layers. I'm not ...
2
votes
0answers
18 views

Regarding formulation of a multipoint model of fluid dynamics

Suppose I am trying to formulate a multipoint model of fluid dynamics. I have a procedure for doing so the details of which is not important to this question, but only that it is based on a series ...
1
vote
0answers
48 views

Variance and Intermittency in turbulence

In the turbulent transport of a scalar field, $\Phi$, decomposed into mean and fluctuating components, $\Phi=\left<\Phi\right>+\phi^\prime$, the scalar variance is defined as ...
3
votes
1answer
105 views

Calculating Length Scales from Passive Scalar Field

I have a set of PLIF images of a passive scalar advected in a turbulent flow. I'm wondering if it's possible to estimate the integral length-scale based on the images of the passive scalar, and if ...
1
vote
1answer
111 views

Visualisation of vortex flows

Are there examples of vortex flows (eg: von Karman vortex street or large eddies) which are visualized in a way apart from displaying where the mass is displayed? I can imagine there to be a display ...
3
votes
0answers
58 views

Where else in physics does one encounter Reynolds averaging?

Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations (RANS) is one of the approaches to turbulence description. Physical quantities, like for example velocity $u_i$, are represented as a sum of a mean and a ...
6
votes
1answer
252 views

How to calculate strength of wind speed in a von Karman vortex?

I am working on a project involving Von Karman vortices coming off of a mountain. I was able to calculate the shedding frequency (thanks to tpg2114 in a prior question), but now find it necessary to ...
1
vote
0answers
64 views

Can a hierarchy of fixed points potentially be used to describe a kinetic energy spectrum which is composed of multiple scale invariant subranges?

Making use of a nonequilibrium functional renormalization group (Berges and Mesterhazy, 2012) are able to investigate a whole hierarchy of fixed points that explain the successive evolution of a ...
2
votes
1answer
496 views

Drag force at high speeds [duplicate]

The drag force on a spherical body according to Stokes' law is given by $$F = 6π\mu rv$$ Where $\mu$ is the dynamic viscosity of the fluid, $r$ is the radius of the spherical object, and $v$ is its ...
5
votes
2answers
115 views

In turbulence theory, what happens if i take space average of fluctuating part?

According to Reynolds decomposition, velocity field is split into two time average and fluctuating parts: $$u_{({\bf x},t)}=\overline u_{(\bf x)}+u'_{({\bf x},t)}$$ we know that time average of ...
1
vote
1answer
90 views

Is this the reason solids suspended in turbulent fluids don't settle?

While I know (and can observe) that solids don't settle easily in a turbulent flow, I struggle with understanding why exactly this is the case. Here' my problem: Conceptually, turbulence means high ...
1
vote
1answer
181 views

Navier-Stokes - Complete set under turbulent eddy viscosity hypothesis

I'm looking for the complete set (x,y,z component) of the Navier-Stoke equations under the Eddy Viscosity hypothesis to model turbulent fluid flow. I found the following, but I have a really hard ...
6
votes
1answer
144 views

Why is there no UV catastrophe (divergence) in turbulence?

I have just read that as the Reynolds number is increased, the separation of macroscopic and microscopic scales increases and that this also means that there is no UV catastrophy (or equivalently UV ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

What does the Reynolds Number of a flow represent physically?

What does the Reynolds Number of a flow represent physically? I am having trouble understanding the meaning and the utility of the Reynolds number for a certain flow, could someone please tell me how ...
2
votes
0answers
55 views

What is the relationship between complex time singularities and UV fixed points?

In this paper it is described how the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum and the flatness (a measure for intermittency) are governed by the position of the (dominant) singularities of the solutions of ...
11
votes
3answers
989 views

Can Increasing the Turbulence Inside a Pipeline Economically Increase Flow?

"The velocity gradient in turbulent flows is steeper close to the wall and less steep in the center of the pipe than it is for laminar flows (Blatt p.97)." Does this mean that some degree of ...
1
vote
1answer
160 views

2-D Turbulence - how does it look like?

Consider parallel flow in the X direction over a 2D semi infinite flat plate. If turbulence is 2-D, in which axes should we expect the vortices to form. Also, are there any experimental/visualization ...
1
vote
0answers
117 views

Physical interpretation of an intermittency definition

A random function $v(t)$ is said to be intermittent at small scales of its "Flatness" $F$, given as $$ F(\Omega) = \frac{\langle (v_{\Omega}^{>}(t))^4\rangle}{\langle ...
12
votes
2answers
3k views

What is the mystery of turbulence?

One of the great unsolved problems in physics is turbulence but I'm not too clear what the mystery is. Does it mean that the Navier-Stokes equations don't have any turbulent phenomena even if we solve ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

how to determine if a vortex is laminar or turbulent

In a cylindrical chamber with a high diameter-to-height ratio; a fluid is tangentially injected. there is an axial exit to the cylinder. how do I determine if the vortex so formed is laminar or ...
3
votes
0answers
119 views

Difference between a Fixed Point and a Limit Point in implementations of the Renormalization Group (RNG) in Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model

In the introduction of this paper, it is explained that and how the application of a dynamic subrid scale model for turbulence into a large eddy simulation (LES) model corresponds to doing one ...
5
votes
0answers
395 views

Can a divider “laminarize” turbulent flow and thus reduce friction?

Looking at the Moody chart I think to myself, the friction factor doesn't decrease much at all with Reynolds number after a certain point. I wonder if laminar flow is more efficient in a sense, and ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

How to estimate the Kolmogorov length scale

My understanding of Kolmogorov scales doesn't really go beyond this poem: Big whirls have little whirls that feed on their velocity, and little whirls have lesser whirls and so on to viscosity. ...
9
votes
2answers
2k views

What is enstrophy?

In turbulence, the enstrophy of a flow in a domain $\mathcal{D} \subset \mathbb{R}^{D}$ $$ \mathcal{E} = \int_{\mathcal{D}} |\vec{\nabla} \times \, \vec{v}|^2 d^{D}x $$ appears sometimes, it's cool ...
2
votes
1answer
262 views

Is it wrong to associate non-isotropic flow high with Reynolds-Number and is there a better metric?

IT is often stated the flow with high Re is not isotropic, meaning there is no uniform or dominant direction of the flow. But this seems wrong to me - -while there's certainly cases where no dominant ...
12
votes
2answers
191 views

Cascade in relativistic turbulence

The Kolmogorov theory of turbulence indicates an energy cascade in turbulence. Is there a corresponding version of relativistic fluid?
10
votes
1answer
443 views

About turbulence modeling

I have some questions about this paper: Lagrangian/Hamiltonian formalism for description of Navier-Stokes fluids. R. J. Becker. Phys. Rev. Lett. 58 no. 14 (1987), pp. 1419-1422. After reading ...
1
vote
1answer
145 views

Does turbulence violate Galilean relativity?

Fluid flows become turbulent beyond a certain velocity. The velocity is almost always with respect to a fixed boundary. However, an observer in a frame of reference travelling with the fluid will also ...
3
votes
2answers
664 views

Vortex street and Reynolds number

Its been stated in Wikipedia regarding Reynolds number(Re) that "laminar flow occurs when Re<2300 and turbulent flow occurs when Re>4000. In another wiki file related to Kármán vortex street it has ...