9
votes
2answers
684 views

Why do co-rotating vortices coalesce, but not counter-rotating ones?

In studying the aerodynamics of modern aircraft equipped with high-lift devices, I have discovered that quite a number of distinct trailing vortices are present in the immediate wake of an airplane in ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Uses of the Reynolds number

I have seen a lot of places talking about the Reynolds number and how it is calculated, but I have never seen an equation that actually made use of this number to calculate lift, drag, or other ...
5
votes
1answer
152 views

Why aren't airplanes like golf balls?

Ok this is a silly question but here it goes Although it is good to have a laminar flow of the air around the object for low drag but the laminar flow is prone the phenomena called separation (sounds ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Relationship between the fall time and projected area

I am investigating the relationship between the fall time of a paper tray and its projected area. In this investigation I have been using the following variables: Controlled Variable: The air ...
2
votes
2answers
157 views

If the MH370 black box did sink to 15000 ft, how long would it have taken?

I have been following MH370 on the news just as everyone and latest reports seem to indicate that the black-box could be found. A recent info-graphic http://t.co/lyBBE9C2hF shows the insurmountable ...
0
votes
2answers
69 views

Finding power with Drag Force equation

The mass of the car is 1500 kg. The shape of the body is such that its aerodynamic drag coefficient is $C_D=0.330$ and the frontal area is $2.50 m^2$. Assuming that the drag force is proportional to ...
3
votes
2answers
51 views

What causes drag in a fluid?

What causes resistance of an object to motion within a fluid like water? Please explain to me the molecular dynamics of the situation.
14
votes
1answer
220 views

How fast would a truck have to go to pull a pedestrian onto the road? [closed]

Let's suppose a pedestrian P is walking or standing next to a highway. Suppose a truck T will drive by the said pedestrian at speed V leaving distance L between the two. Assuming L is a reasonably ...
-1
votes
1answer
115 views

free falling object with air resistance?

we already know that if we plot speed vs time of free falling object it will be y=gx graph because we know the acceleration is gravity. If it have air-resistance acceleration will be change right?. ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Drag coefficient of a non-Newtonian fluid?

I am working through non-Newtonian fluid (Bingham fluid around cylinder), I know the drag coefficient is the measure of the total force exerted by the fluid on the cylinder in the direction of flow ...
1
vote
1answer
110 views

Bernoulli's principle on a curve ball

I've seen a few excellent answers here on the Magnus force, which explains why balls with a spin will curve. However, my intuition is still telling me that the Bernoulli's principle would push it the ...
3
votes
2answers
154 views

Is there a better approximation of drag (other than quadratic drag)?

This is a student inquiry sparked by sheer curiosity. Wikipedia states the drag equation, $F = 1/2v^2pC_dA_c$. (p = mass density of fluid/gas, v = velocity, c_d = drag coefficient, a_c = cross ...
3
votes
1answer
339 views

Where do the equations for resistive force come from?

I've been watching MIT's Walter Lewin physics lectures. In lecture 12, Lewin pulls, out of nowhere, a couple of equations regarding resistive/drag forces in fluids: $$\begin{align} \vec{F_{res}} ...
2
votes
2answers
152 views

How does the curve ball drag air around it?

In cricket or baseball there is a type of ball called the curve ball. This is the top spin of the ball.I read that due to spin the ball drags the air around it due to friction in the way shown ...
3
votes
2answers
443 views

Example of inviscid flow with drag

This was my engineering viva question and I couldn't think of any example, for I am totally convinced that there cannot be drag in a inviscid flow. It also bothers me whether it is possible, a ...
1
vote
0answers
163 views

What is the drag coefficient of an open wedge?

To check my two dimensional CFD calculation I am looking for reference data on the drag coefficient of an open wedge. The geometry is shown below, together with the flow direction. I have found ...
10
votes
4answers
1k views

How do I calculate the distance a ship will take to stop?

I am a River Pilot and drive ships for a living. These ships are very large and range up to 160,000 Metric Tons. I am trying to figure out how to calculate the distance to stopping. I have a basic ...
2
votes
1answer
394 views

Does the Magnitude of the Drag Coefficient on a Rectangular Prism vary with Rotation?

I have a question about the drag coefficient in the drag equation. Let's say I have a rectangular prism oriented such that, looking down on it, the long side is parallel to the y-axis. Moving forward ...
2
votes
1answer
469 views

Drag force at high speeds [duplicate]

The drag force on a spherical body according to Stokes' law is given by $$F = 6π\mu rv$$ Where $\mu$ is the dynamic viscosity of the fluid, $r$ is the radius of the spherical object, and $v$ is its ...
10
votes
1answer
311 views

How would you swim in inviscid water?

The viscosity of water creates drag on swimmer's body so its effect is to slow down the swimmer. However the viscosity seems to be essential for pushing the water backwards by the swimmer's arms and ...
6
votes
2answers
771 views

Could some design of a propeller be used in both air and water?

Propellers in water are smaller in diameter. They also move more slowly. On the other hand, aircraft propellers are larger in diameter, have narrower blades and operate at very high speeds. An ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Concerning drag on a flow past a cylinder

I am wondering about the drag coefficient for a flow past a cylinder. I am reading this article. I understand why the drag is high to begin with (point 2), when the boundary layer separates and the ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

Explanation that air drag is proportional to speed or square speed?

A falling object with no initial velocity with mass $m$ is influenced by a gravitational force $g$ and the drag (air resistance) which is proportional to the object's speed. By Newton´s laws this can ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Drag on a spinning ball in fluid

I am a physics newbie (high school level) and I am wondering what happens when a spherical object is spinning on the spot in a bunch of gas (no gravity here, just an imaginary physics sandbox). Am I ...
2
votes
1answer
349 views

Limitations of drag equation

The magnitude of the air resistance for objects with Reynolds numbers greater than 1000 is given by the formula: Why it does not hold for objects with lower Reynolds numbers? Can I use this ...
2
votes
2answers
421 views

What would be an appropiate shape for a parachute?

I'm trying to design a parachute that minimizes the descent velocity, but I'm not sure what shape I should use. From what I've read, ellipse-shaped parachutes are too aerodynamic and minimize drag, ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Free fall of two spheres made of same materials, different masses, with air resistance

Two people falling with the same parachute will gain different speeds if their masses are different. The upward air drag will needed to be bigger for a heavier person, since gravitational force is ...
3
votes
2answers
940 views

Is the wind's force on a stationary object proportional to $v^2$?

I am on a boat docked at Cape Charles, VA, about 30 or 40 miles from the center of Hurricane Irene. This understandably got me thinking about the force of wind on the boat. Since air friction is ...