The tag has no usage guidance.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (2)

3
votes
0answers
40 views

How does the choice of a particular vacuum in a field theory problem decide the number of Goldstone bosons?

How does the field expansion method (by this I mean expanding your fields about a chosen VEV and plugging into a given potential so that the masses of the fields are given by the coefficients in ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

How does the choice of a basis decide how many Goldstone bosons there are under spontaneous symmetry breaking?

I have a question about how the basis you choose in a field theory problem semmingly decides how many Goldstone bosons you get after spontaneous symmetry breaking. For SU(2), if you choose the 3 Pauli ...
0
votes
2answers
324 views

Understanding field representation of force [duplicate]

I am reading the book The Evolution of Physics. I have a doubt in the topic "The field as representation". In this topic authors give the example of gravitational force represented as a field. In the ...
7
votes
3answers
437 views

If particles are excitations what are their fields?

After reading these : http://www.symmetrymagazine.org/article/july-2013/real-talk-everything-is-made-of-fields http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=682522 It was clear to me that all ...
10
votes
2answers
192 views

Inverting the equation for $T_{\mu\nu}$ in terms of $F_{\mu\nu}$

The Stress-Energy Tensor for electromagnetism is given by: $$ T_{\mu \nu} = F_{\mu}\,^{\alpha}F_{\nu\alpha}-\frac{1}{4}g_{\mu\nu}F_{\alpha\beta}F^{\alpha\beta} $$ How can I find $F_{\mu\nu}$ in ...
0
votes
0answers
807 views

Scalar field lagrangian in curved spacetime

I am studying inflation theory for a scalar field $\phi$ in curved spacetime. I want to obtain Euler-Lagrange equations for the action: $$ I\left[\phi\right] = \int ...
10
votes
1answer
4k views

The Euler-Lagrange equation in special relativity

How can I derive the Euler-Lagrange equations valid in the field of special relativity? Specifically, consider a scalar field.
2
votes
0answers
50 views

Deriving massless point particle action from Maxwell action?

Starting with the Maxwell action for a $U(1)$ vector gauge boson with a general metric and (I'm assuming) using a plane wave ansatz for the vector, is it possible to derive the action for a massless ...
3
votes
1answer
239 views

Definition of Local Function

Now a days I am studying Srednicki's QFT book. In its third chapter it is written that Any local function of φ(x) is a Lorentz scalar, [...] . Now my question is: What is a local function?
2
votes
1answer
490 views

How to tell local and non-local in QFT?

I'm taking QFT course in this term. I'm quite curious that in QFT by which part of the mathematical expression can we tell a quantity or a theory is local or non-local?
4
votes
2answers
190 views

What guarantees the existence of unitary operators implementing Lorentz Transformations?

This should be a very basic question. In introductory QFT books, often one of the first things we see is the following claim: for every Lorentz transformation $\Lambda$, we can associate an unitary ...
5
votes
1answer
75 views

How can one (formally) determine the particle content of a free field theory?

Here's my question: Suppose I'm given a free field theory, where my fields are functions $\phi:\mathbb{R}^4 \rightarrow V$, and the equations of motion are a system of linear Lorentz-invariant ...
3
votes
1answer
174 views

Translations and Noether's Theorem

I'm fine with $U(1)$ symmetry and Noether's Theorem, but struggling with the translations of the field; namely $$\phi'(x^{\mu})=\phi(x^{\mu}-a^{\mu}),$$ where $a^{\mu}$ constant four-vector ...
0
votes
1answer
165 views

Klein-Gordon, gauge transformation [closed]

It must be really simple, but I cannot get why can we add an $i e \frac{\partial \Lambda}{\partial x}$ in the second row below. The propagation of a charged scalar particle, along the x-axis and in ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

Where does the potential energy associated with the field go if it is removed? [closed]

I have an electric field and a certain charged particle in it that has a certain potential energy associated with it. Where does the energy go if I remove the field?
5
votes
5answers
364 views

Euler-Lagrange equation for continuous systems

I'm having a little trouble with wrapping my head around a part of a method which is fairly 'new' in some fashions to me. I imagine it should be fairly obvious, but I am not seeing something at the ...
0
votes
0answers
106 views

Does the Fringe effect occur in capacitors in the interdigitated form?

I am currently doing my undergrad dissertation on graphene supercapacitors. I have read that the fringe effect is a well established phenomenon on parallel plate capacitors, but does it also occur in ...
1
vote
2answers
233 views

Is $\frac{\partial}{\partial \Phi(y)} \Phi (x) = \delta(x-y)$ correct?

As stated in the heading: Is $\frac{\partial}{\partial \Phi(y)} \Phi (x) = \delta(x-y)$ correct? Here denotes $\Phi(x)$ denotes a scalar field. And if yes, why? Any reference where I can read about ...
1
vote
0answers
186 views

Green Function for Proca Equation

I have tried to find a retarded and advanced Green function for Proca field equation. $(\Box - \mu^2)A^{\mu}=J^{\mu}$ where $\mu$ is the mass term. How I did it: first: I made Fourier ...
2
votes
0answers
89 views

Approximation of skeleton diagrams

I'm studying the diagrammatics for a Bose system (in the superfluid phase) developed by Gavoret and Nozieres (Annals of Physics 28 349 (1964)). In this paper, they show how to solve the problem using ...
7
votes
1answer
207 views

Why does Einstein say contradictions arise from treating the EM field as lines of force?

EDIT - I have included the context of the quote I am interested in, as people seem to be as baffled by Einstein's quote as I am: In a 1920 address Einstein says this: Think of waves on the ...
-1
votes
4answers
822 views

Does a charge experience no force due to electric field produced by it?

My book "Concepts of Physics (Satish K. Gupta)" says: The electric field of a charge is the space property by virtue of which the charge modifies the space around itself. As a result, if any ...
3
votes
1answer
108 views

Massless Thirring Model in 1+1 Dimensions

In Coleman's paper, "Quantum sine-Gordon equation as the massive Thirring Model" (link to Phys Rev D article), he pointed out that the massless Thirring Model is exactly scale invariant. More over, ...
1
vote
0answers
139 views

Why does Principle for least action hold for classical fields [duplicate]

Let $\mathscr L (\phi(\mathbf x), \partial \phi(\mathbf x))$ denote the Lagrangian density of field $\phi(\mathbf x)$. Then then actual value of the field $\phi(\mathbf x)$ can be computed from the ...
0
votes
2answers
98 views

Is there an analogue of a geodesic for the evolution of the electromagnetic field? [duplicate]

For a charged particle moving in free space, we can say from the homogeneity of space-time, that it moves along a geodesic. Is there an analogous principle for the evolution of the electromagnetic ...
1
vote
1answer
142 views

How to understand dynamics $\dot x_i=\partial_jA_{ij}$ from skew-symmetric potential $A$?

We speak of a dynamical system with a potential if there is a scalar possibly depending on coordinate such that the vector field is exactly the (negative) gradient of the potential. That means each ...
10
votes
5answers
1k views

Quantum mechanics as classical field theory

Can we view the normal, non-relativistic quantum mechanics as a classical fields? I know, that one can derive the Schrödinger equation from the Lagrangian density $${\cal L} ~=~ \frac{i\hbar}{2} ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

What are the spaces over spacetime points in which a field takes its values? Is it always the same?

When it comes to the fibrations encountered in field theories of physics, are the fibers over the base space always the same?
7
votes
1answer
319 views

Generator of local symmetries

Let us only consider classical field theories in this discussion. Noether's theorem states that for every global symmetry, there exists a conserved current and a conserved charge. The charge is the ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

The relation between the movement of electrons and energy

So, I've been enjoying reading a lot of helpful posts, but now, I found myself in the need of asking something. I have a hard time grasping the general concept of electricity / how the relation ...
4
votes
1answer
217 views

Non-relativistic limit in a Lagrangian density

What criteria should I consider when determining the non-relativistic limit of a Lagrangian density? For example, how would I take the non-relativistic limit of the following Lagrangian density: ...
1
vote
2answers
149 views

Visualising the magnetic field [closed]

How can we visualise the magnetic field?How to visualise magnetic field due to current carrying conductor having poles(like north and south for ordinary magnetic). Can we determine the north and the ...
7
votes
1answer
191 views

Symmetries in physics

Can you explain me some of the mathematical details of such concept as symmetries? In physics, we have some manifold, and fields are functions on this manifold. On the one hand, we have symmetries of ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Collected Gravitational Field

I wasn't sure what to call this, I'm not a physicist. I basically have a collection of massive bodies. I to calculate the gravitational field of all those objects collected; how to do this? The ...
18
votes
1answer
475 views

Is there a field equation which can reduce into all three flavors of spin (zero, one, one half)?

Is there a known particle field equation of a similar form $$ \begin{equation} (\Gamma^n \pi_n)^2 \Psi = (mc)^2 \Psi \tag{1} \end{equation} $$ such that by reducing the number of degrees of freedom ...
10
votes
1answer
448 views

Auxiliary fields in supersymmetry

I know that auxiliary fields can be used to close the supersymmetry algebra in case the bosonic and fermionic on-shell degrees of freedom do not match. Could somebody please elaborate on this concept ...
1
vote
1answer
198 views

How to obtain Maxwell's Lagrangian from complex scalar fields?

I've looked in several books and they all show how to obtain electrical interactions by forcing local gauge invariance of any complex scalar field Lagrangian (like Klein-Gordon or Dirac). I manage to ...
6
votes
1answer
146 views

Intuition for actions written as integrals over spacetime

Right now I'm simply looking for an intuitive explaination of actions that integrate over a 4-volume element, $d^4x$ rather than a parameter say $\lambda$. More specifically I'm well versed in action ...
5
votes
3answers
547 views

Meaning of kinetic part in the Lagrangian density?

What is the physical meaning of the kinetic term in the classical scalar field Lagrangian $$\mathcal{L}_{kin}~=~\frac{1}{2}(\partial_\mu\phi)(\partial^\mu\phi)~?$$ It gives how does the field change ...
4
votes
1answer
143 views

Definition of vacuum in field theory; Connection between the classical definition and the connection to QFT

I am a bit confused by what is defined to be a vacuum in field theory. Classically a vaccum state is defined to be the state where the field sits at some minima of the potential $\frac{\partial ...
3
votes
0answers
139 views

Complex scalar fields conserved charges

I'm currently studying field theory and I'm having some trouble with conserved charge given in field components. If we have a complex scalar action of a field $\phi=(\phi_1,\phi_2)^T$ that is ...
2
votes
1answer
158 views

Noether Charge For Scalar Fields Under Lorentz Transformations

The conserved charge associated with the Lorentz transfomation of a scalar field is given by $Q^{\alpha\beta}=\int d^3x\frac{1}{2}(x^\alpha T^{0\beta}-x^\beta T^{0\alpha})$. The quantities $Q^{ij}$ is ...
3
votes
1answer
144 views

What advantages does action-at-a-distance description have over the field view of forces?

It is written in Jackson (page 3) : In fact, though there are recurring attempts to eliminate explicit reference to the fields in favor of action-at-a-distance descriptions of the interaction of ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

What happens if the energy has no lower bound?

In almost all theories that we investigate there is an lower bound on the energy. But is this necessary for a theory to be a good description of reality? I know from quantum field theory, that in its ...
2
votes
0answers
353 views

Product of $\gamma^5 \sigma^{\mu\nu}$

I'm trying to prove that $\gamma^5 \sigma^{\mu\nu}=\frac{i}{2}\epsilon^{\mu\nu\alpha\beta}\sigma_{\alpha\beta}$ I started with the left hand side and expanded the $\gamma^5$ to ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Circulation of the gauge potential around an infinitesimal loop: how to get the correct gauge field strength tensor

I've been puzzling with the problem below for more than a hour since it is misleadingly discussed in some textbooks, so I believe it deserves a solution here. Any comments are welcome. I'm trying to ...
6
votes
1answer
116 views

In which field theories with fermions do string- and fivebrane structures not come up?

A year ago, username @Greg Graviton asked in a thread here about the Spin group as covering of the spatial rotations. A subquestion was: What other groups, even larger than SU(2) are there that ...
1
vote
2answers
193 views

Classical point particles to classical fields

I often hear that in the continuum limit we can study large numbers of particles as fields. I always imagined that by removing all bounds on the number of particles (while keeping total energy, ...
4
votes
0answers
109 views

One more time about Nordstrom theory

Wikipedia says that Nordstrom theory with equations of motion of the test particle $$\tag{1} \frac{d (\varphi u_{\alpha})}{d \tau} = \partial_{\alpha} \varphi $$ and field equation $$\tag{2} \varphi ...