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4
votes
2answers
101 views

Non-local structure of field theory

Can someone explain what is non-local structure of field theory? I know you cannot have $\phi(x) \phi(y)$ term in Lagrangian which indicates the non-locality. However, why I cannot have the non-local ...
3
votes
1answer
763 views

Need for a side book for E.Soper`s Classical Theory Of Fields.

I am reading now E Soper Classical Theory Of Fields now and sometimes it is very hard to follow the equations.So I need a side book to read it comfortably.Landau`s book is not helping as its content ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

How do we know what type of gauge field to add to a theory?

I've been watching Leonard Susskind's particle physics lectures and in one lecture, he discusses a very simple gauge theory. We have a complex scalar field $\phi(x)$ with Lagrangian $$\mathscr{L} = ...
3
votes
0answers
123 views

Suggested reading for classical field theory [duplicate]

I am reading a marvelous book Classical Field Theory by E Soper, but it is mathematically too compact and sometimes I am unable to follow the equations. Can anyone suggest a side book for solution of ...
4
votes
3answers
138 views

Complex Dirac field in antiparticle description

I understand that the Dirac equation has negative and positive sets of solutions and this contributes to its quantization by a superposition of two Fourier modes represented as creation and ...
1
vote
1answer
105 views

A Spin up particle in QFT

This appears like a question that is rarely addressed in field theory pedagogy (perhaps because the answer is obvious): how does one describe a particle of definite spin in quantum field theory? For ...
6
votes
2answers
213 views

Mass generation by Chern-Simons theory

Why the mass generation via a Higgs mechanism is different from that of Chern-Simons theory? I haven't done any formal course in Quantum field theory,so how do I understand this just having some basic ...
56
votes
10answers
7k views

What is a field, really?

There was a reason why I constantly failed physics at school and university, and that reason was, apart from the fact I was immensely lazy, that I mentally refused to "believe" more advanced stuff ...
3
votes
1answer
95 views

Lagrangian description of Brownian motion?

I'm interested in the existence of a Lagrangian field theory description of Bronwnian motion, does such a thing exist? Given a particle of some spin $\sigma$, which has a Lagrangian associated with ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Action of the Poincare Group on a Scalar Function

Let $F(x^\mu)$ is a scalar function; i.e. $F(x^\mu): \mathbb{R}^{1,3} \rightarrow \mathbb{R}$. How the Poincare Group $P(1,3)$ will act on it; i.e., by which formula I can calculate it for a specific ...
1
vote
0answers
20 views

Energy Tensor, covariant derivate, variation respect to the metric [duplicate]

I'm doing the variation of a Lagrangian respect to the metric, but I am having problem with a particular terminus. My action is: $$ S=\int d^4x \sqrt{-g}[ (\nabla_\mu A^\mu)^2]$$ My lagrangian is: ...
4
votes
2answers
305 views

Mean field theory = large-N approximation?

Wikipedia entry of 1/N expansion (or 't Hooft large-N expansion) mentions that It (large-N) is also extensively used in condensed matter physics where it can be used to provide a rigorous basis ...
1
vote
0answers
77 views

Sign of Feynman rules with derivative couplings

Feynman rules for derivative couplings always make me confused. For example, the derivative in $gV^\mu\phi^+\partial_\mu\phi^-$ will give you $\pm ip_{-\mu}$, where $\pm$ depends on whether the ...
4
votes
1answer
122 views

Conceptual question about field transformation

(c.f Conformal Field Theory by Di Francesco et al, p39) From another source, I understand the mathematical derivation that leads to eqn (2.126) in Di Francesco et al, however conceptually I do not ...
4
votes
0answers
94 views

What decides the signs and coefficients of terms in superfield?

I'm working on a problem in 3d field theory and I'm confused about how to write the superfields. Specifically, I'm not sure if the signs and coefficients of terms are purely a matter of convention or ...
3
votes
1answer
300 views

Why do we assume that Dirac spinor $\Psi$ describe the particle, not the field?

It is a well-known fact that Klein-Gordon scalar $\Psi(x)$, $$ (\partial^{2} + m^2) \Psi (x) = 0 $$ as well as 4-vector $A_{\mu}(x)$, $$ (\partial^{2} + m^{2})A_{\mu} = 0,\quad ...
4
votes
1answer
227 views

Noether's Theorem in Field Theory

This question is regarding Noether's Theorem in general, but also in the application to an example. The example is: Find the conserved current for the Lagrangian ...
3
votes
0answers
50 views

Scalar product of torsional forms - how are the standard identities modified?

It is known that for any smooth, orientable, compact manifold $X$ without boundary and $\alpha \in \Omega^{r}(X), \beta \in \Omega^{r-1}(X)$ it holds \begin{equation} (d\beta,\alpha)= (\beta, ...
2
votes
1answer
151 views

Local versus non-local functionals

I'm new to field theory and I don't understand the difference between a "local" functional and a "non-local" functional. Explanations that I find resort to ambiguous definitions of locality and then ...
10
votes
1answer
258 views

Energy-Momentum Tensor in QFT vs. GR

What is the correspondence between the conserved canonical energy-momentum tensor, which is $$ T^{\mu\nu}_{can} := \sum_{i=1}^N\frac{\delta\mathcal{L}_{Matter}}{\delta(\partial_\mu f_i)}\partial^\nu ...
11
votes
2answers
725 views

What is the nature of electric field? is it quantized? is it a wave?

What I seek here is to understand whether the electric field in its pure form as in between the electron and the proton is uniform or does it have some kind of wave/particle nature or both, does it ...
0
votes
2answers
233 views

How is the direction of Magnetic/Electric Lines of Force Known?

It is shown that the direction of magnetic line is from north to the south and that of the electric line is from positive to negative. How do we/scientists know that the imaginary lines of force or ...
3
votes
0answers
38 views

How does the choice of a particular vacuum in a field theory problem decide the number of Goldstone bosons?

How does the field expansion method (by this I mean expanding your fields about a chosen VEV and plugging into a given potential so that the masses of the fields are given by the coefficients in ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

How does the choice of a basis decide how many Goldstone bosons there are under spontaneous symmetry breaking?

I have a question about how the basis you choose in a field theory problem semmingly decides how many Goldstone bosons you get after spontaneous symmetry breaking. For SU(2), if you choose the 3 Pauli ...
0
votes
2answers
259 views

Understanding field representation of force [duplicate]

I am reading the book The Evolution of Physics. I have a doubt in the topic "The field as representation". In this topic authors give the example of gravitational force represented as a field. In the ...
7
votes
3answers
272 views

If particles are excitations what are their fields?

After reading these : http://www.symmetrymagazine.org/article/july-2013/real-talk-everything-is-made-of-fields http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=682522 It was clear to me that all ...
10
votes
2answers
179 views

Inverting the equation for $T_{\mu\nu}$ in terms of $F_{\mu\nu}$

The Stress-Energy Tensor for electromagnetism is given by: $$ T_{\mu \nu} = F_{\mu}\,^{\alpha}F_{\nu\alpha}-\frac{1}{4}g_{\mu\nu}F_{\alpha\beta}F^{\alpha\beta} $$ How can I find $F_{\mu\nu}$ in ...
0
votes
0answers
619 views

Scalar field lagrangian in curved spacetime

I am studying inflation theory for a scalar field $\phi$ in curved spacetime. I want to obtain Euler-Lagrange equations for the action: $$ I\left[\phi\right] = \int ...
9
votes
1answer
3k views

The Euler-Lagrange equation in special relativity

How can I derive the Euler-Lagrange equations valid in the field of special relativity? Specifically, consider a scalar field.
2
votes
0answers
44 views

Deriving massless point particle action from Maxwell action?

Starting with the Maxwell action for a $U(1)$ vector gauge boson with a general metric and (I'm assuming) using a plane wave ansatz for the vector, is it possible to derive the action for a massless ...
3
votes
1answer
176 views

Definition of Local Function

Now a days I am studying Srednicki's QFT book. In its third chapter it is written that Any local function of φ(x) is a Lorentz scalar, [...] . Now my question is: What is a local function?
2
votes
1answer
387 views

How to tell local and non-local in QFT?

I'm taking QFT course in this term. I'm quite curious that in QFT by which part of the mathematical expression can we tell a quantity or a theory is local or non-local?
4
votes
2answers
165 views

What guarantees the existence of unitary operators implementing Lorentz Transformations?

This should be a very basic question. In introductory QFT books, often one of the first things we see is the following claim: for every Lorentz transformation $\Lambda$, we can associate an unitary ...
5
votes
1answer
66 views

How can one (formally) determine the particle content of a free field theory?

Here's my question: Suppose I'm given a free field theory, where my fields are functions $\phi:\mathbb{R}^4 \rightarrow V$, and the equations of motion are a system of linear Lorentz-invariant ...
3
votes
1answer
133 views

Translations and Noether's Theorem

I'm fine with $U(1)$ symmetry and Noether's Theorem, but struggling with the translations of the field; namely $$\phi'(x^{\mu})=\phi(x^{\mu}-a^{\mu}),$$ where $a^{\mu}$ constant four-vector ...
0
votes
1answer
118 views

Klein-Gordon, gauge transformation [closed]

It must be really simple, but I cannot get why can we add an $i e \frac{\partial \Lambda}{\partial x}$ in the second row below. The propagation of a charged scalar particle, along the x-axis and in ...
1
vote
0answers
52 views

Where does the potential energy associated with the field go if it is removed? [closed]

I have an electric field and a certain charged particle in it that has a certain potential energy associated with it. Where does the energy go if I remove the field?
5
votes
5answers
296 views

Euler-Lagrange equation for continuous systems

I'm having a little trouble with wrapping my head around a part of a method which is fairly 'new' in some fashions to me. I imagine it should be fairly obvious, but I am not seeing something at the ...
0
votes
0answers
75 views

Does the Fringe effect occur in capacitors in the interdigitated form?

I am currently doing my undergrad dissertation on graphene supercapacitors. I have read that the fringe effect is a well established phenomenon on parallel plate capacitors, but does it also occur in ...
1
vote
2answers
188 views

Is $\frac{\partial}{\partial \Phi(y)} \Phi (x) = \delta(x-y)$ correct?

As stated in the heading: Is $\frac{\partial}{\partial \Phi(y)} \Phi (x) = \delta(x-y)$ correct? Here denotes $\Phi(x)$ denotes a scalar field. And if yes, why? Any reference where I can read about ...
1
vote
0answers
153 views

Green Function for Proca Equation

I have tried to find a retarded and advanced Green function for Proca field equation. $(\Box - \mu^2)A^{\mu}=J^{\mu}$ where $\mu$ is the mass term. How I did it: first: I made Fourier ...
2
votes
0answers
67 views

Approximation of skeleton diagrams

I'm studying the diagrammatics for a Bose system (in the superfluid phase) developed by Gavoret and Nozieres (Annals of Physics 28 349 (1964)). In this paper, they show how to solve the problem using ...
7
votes
1answer
185 views

Why does Einstein say contradictions arise from treating the EM field as lines of force?

EDIT - I have included the context of the quote I am interested in, as people seem to be as baffled by Einstein's quote as I am: In a 1920 address Einstein says this: Think of waves on the ...
0
votes
4answers
647 views

Does a charge experience no force due to electric field produced by it?

My book "Concepts of Physics (Satish K. Gupta)" says: The electric field of a charge is the space property by virtue of which the charge modifies the space around itself. As a result, if any ...
3
votes
1answer
100 views

Massless Thirring Model in 1+1 Dimensions

In Coleman's paper, "Quantum sine-Gordon equation as the massive Thirring Model" (link to Phys Rev D article), he pointed out that the massless Thirring Model is exactly scale invariant. More over, ...
1
vote
0answers
122 views

Why does Principle for least action hold for classical fields [duplicate]

Let $\mathscr L (\phi(\mathbf x), \partial \phi(\mathbf x))$ denote the Lagrangian density of field $\phi(\mathbf x)$. Then then actual value of the field $\phi(\mathbf x)$ can be computed from the ...
0
votes
2answers
83 views

Is there an analogue of a geodesic for the evolution of the electromagnetic field? [duplicate]

For a charged particle moving in free space, we can say from the homogeneity of space-time, that it moves along a geodesic. Is there an analogous principle for the evolution of the electromagnetic ...
1
vote
1answer
140 views

How to understand dynamics $\dot x_i=\partial_jA_{ij}$ from skew-symmetric potential $A$?

We speak of a dynamical system with a potential if there is a scalar possibly depending on coordinate such that the vector field is exactly the (negative) gradient of the potential. That means each ...
10
votes
5answers
1k views

Quantum mechanics as classical field theory

Can we view the normal, non-relativistic quantum mechanics as a classical fields? I know, that one can derive the Schrödinger equation from the Lagrangian density $${\cal L} ~=~ \frac{i\hbar}{2} ...