Fermions are particles with an intrinsic angular momentum (i.e. spin) equal to a "half integer" number of fundamental units: $\frac{(2n+1)}{2} \hbar$ for integer $n$. Fermions are required to be in a quantum state that is globally anti-symmetric, which leads to the Pauli Exclusion Principle barring ...

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What is the point of path integral for boson and fermion?

I am a beginner to study QFT and confused about path integral for boson or fermion. I have read about the path integral for single particle, and finished some problems. But I cannot understand the ...
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1answer
86 views

Multi-Fermion interactions induced by integrating-out Yukawa-Higgs terms?

Suppose one considers a multi-component free fermions field theory with field $\psi_{q_i}$ with a give global symmetry (such as U(1)). We can say that every component of fermions carry some U(1) ...
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2answers
282 views

Electrons, spins, and degeneracy

In an atom, two electrons can have the same set of $n,\ell,m$ quantum numbers as long as they have opposite spins. My introductory physics and chemistry courses have all introduced this as two ...
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2answers
488 views

Does black hole formation contradict the Pauli exclusion principle?

A star's collapse can be halted by the degeneracy pressure of electrons or neutrons due to the Pauli exclusion principle. In extreme relativistic conditions, a star will continue to collapse ...
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1answer
364 views

Fermion mass Higgs mechanism

How get fermion like a electron a mass through the higgs-mechanism? Can someone explain me this with formulas (Lagrangian)? I know that the Yukawa interaction has something to do with, is that right? ...
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1answer
152 views

Entanglement entropy of 1D chiral Fermion

I was told that the entanglement entropy $S_E$ on the ground state of a (1+1)D conformal field theory (CFT) follows the logarithmic behavior $S_E=\frac{c}{12}\ln L$ where $L$ is the length scale ...
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2answers
146 views

Is there is a reason for Pauli's Exclusion Principle?

As a starting quantum physicist I am very interested in reasons why does Pauli's Exclusion Principle works. I mean standard explanations are not quite satisfying. Of course we can say that is because ...
3
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2answers
202 views

Wavefunction of an electron

Electron is a spin $\frac{1}{2}$ particle, so needs 2-component wave function but the Dirac theory of electron is based on 4-component wave function, are all components of it independent or only two ...
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1answer
113 views

Are composite bosons always bosonic (e.g. the pion-cloud surrounding the nuclei)?

The $\pi$-meson is a boson, but consists of quark-antiquark (fermions). It seems to me that at some energy level (equivalently distance) the inner structure (fermionic nature of the quarks) of the ...
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1answer
193 views

Derivative with respect to ${\not}{p}$

When studying renormalization of QED in standard textbooks, we typically encounter derivatives with respect to ${\not}{p}=p^\mu \gamma_\mu$, i.e., $\partial/\partial{\not}p$. As far as I understand, ...
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1answer
111 views

Observables still commute even if fields only anti-commute

In Peskin & Schroeder page 56, after introducing anti commutation relations for the fields instead of commutation relations (in order to fix the negative energy problem as well as to have proper ...
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23 views

Quantum Mechanisms for Isotope Fractionation

Are there any quantum properties that would enable isotope fractionation? For example, atoms with odd versus even numbers of neutrons are fermions and bosons, respectively. Has any work been done ...
5
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1answer
327 views

Derivation of a gamma matrices identity

While studying Srednicki's book on quantum field theory, I encountered a particular identity that is of interest to me (equation 36.40): $$\mathcal{C}^{-1}\gamma^\mu\mathcal{C}=-(\gamma^\mu)^T$$ where ...
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326 views

Exact diagonalization by Bogoliubov transformation

I am developing a model of multiple gaps in a square lattice. I simplified the associated Hamiltonian to make it quadratic. In this approximation it is given by, $$ H = \begin{pmatrix} \xi_\mathbf{k} ...
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104 views

Anomaly cancellation and fermion number violation

In the standard model, an axial $SU(3)$ currents has anomaly which after quantization leads to the fermion number violation. However, taking all the fermions into account we note that the anomalies ...
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2answers
131 views

Fermion field structure in non-abelian gauge theories

I am trying to understand the structure of the fermions in non-abelian gauge theories. Disclaimer: my question might be very trivial (I suspect the answer could simply be "a change of basis"), but I ...
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1answer
223 views

A few simple questions about Grassmann numbers: commutation relations and derivatives

I'm trying to learn about Grassmann numbers from the book "Condensed Matter Field Theory" by Altland and Simons, but I am currently encountering some difficulties. I have several smaller questions ...
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1answer
194 views

Fock state and Slater determinant

Let's have Fock state for fermions: $$ | \mathbf p_{1} , \mathbf p_{2}\rangle = \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}\hat {a}^{+}(\mathbf p_{1})\hat {a}^{+}(\mathbf p_{2})| \rangle , \quad | \mathbf p_{2} , \mathbf ...
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2answers
100 views

Quantum operator catastrophe

Assume we look at an interaction between 2 fermions $V \sum_{k_i,k_j,k_m,k_n} c_{k_i}^\dagger c_{k_j}^\dagger c_{k_m} c_{k_n} \delta_k $ where $\delta_k$ conserves momentum. We can directly write ...
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154 views

Time Reversal in Euclidean Spacetime - unitary or antiunitary?

(pre-request) We know that time reversal operator $T$ is an anti-unitary operator in Minkowsi Spacetime. i.e. $$ T z=z^*T $$ where the complex number $z$ becomes its complex conjugate. See, for ...
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2answers
534 views

Propagator for Dirac equation in real space

I'm interested in the retarded propagator for a free massless Dirac fermion, i.e. solutions $ψ$ to the inhomogeneous PDE $$ (∂_t- \nabla·\vec σ) ψ(x,t) = f(x,t) $$ with boundary conditions $$\quad ...
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1answer
79 views

Matrix elements of a one-fermion operator (first and second quantizations)

I'm currently struggling with the expression of operators in second quantization. I did an exercise in which I had to consider a fermion in a central potential $V(\vec{r})$ and show that the matrix ...
6
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1answer
217 views

Four Fermion Interactions

Given an action with a term like \begin{equation}S_{I}\sim \int\int (\psi^{\dagger}\psi)V(\psi^{\dagger}\psi)\end{equation} How do you evaluate this with a Fermionic path integral? I know the fields ...
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90 views

Were fermions ever massless?

In a discussion of the Standard model and Higgs mechanism it was claimed that accordingly: "During an early phase of the cosmos all fermions were massless." I wonder whether this claim can be ...
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1answer
220 views

Grassmann fields according to Peskin and Schroeder

On page 301 in Peskin and Schroeder, they claim that a Grassman field $\psi(x)$ may be decomposed as $$\psi(x) = \sum_i c_i \phi_i(x),$$ where the $c_i$ are Grassmann numbers and the $\phi_i$ are ...
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1answer
141 views

2N Fermions $\stackrel{?}{=}$ N Bosons

We know that we do have composite particles (for example Atoms) made of fermions or bosons or mixture of them with fermionic or bosonic statistics. So why can't a gas of $2N$ fermions become a gas of ...
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291 views

Time Reversal, CPT, spin-statistics, mass gap and chirality of Euclidean fermion field theory

In Minkowski space even-dim (say $d+1$ D) spacetime dimension, we can write fermion-field theory as the Lagrangian: $$ \mathcal{L}=\bar{\psi} (i\not \partial-m)\psi+ \bar{\psi} \phi_1 \psi+\bar{\psi} ...
3
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1answer
191 views

Minus Sign in Feynman Diagram

I've been reading these notes and I can't figure out the why on P.120, it is said that The fermionic statistics mean that the first diagram has an extra minus sign relative to the ψψ scattering ...
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2answers
139 views

Workaround to fermion sign problem?

My (rather incomplete) understanding of the NP-hard fermion/numerical sign problem is that it occurs when attempting to converge on a wavefunction for many-body fermion systems (for example, a small ...
2
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1answer
160 views

Almost identical fermions fighting for the same state

In quantum 101, we all learned that identical particles behave strangely, even in the absence of interactions: no two fermions can be in the same state, but bosons love to be in the same state. But ...
3
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1answer
157 views

SUSY as the only way to unify bosons and fermions

Is SUSY really the only known approach to "merge"/unify bosons and fermions in a common framework? BONUS question: If SUSY does exist at high energy, it seems unnatural and "not simple" in the sense ...
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1answer
249 views

Physical implications behind the exchange antisymmetry condition of fermions

Explain the Physical implications behind the exchange antisymmetry condition of fermions. This condition forms the basis of the pauli principle but I can't find/understand what happens physically that ...
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3answers
597 views

Fermionic anti-commutation relations

For Pauli's exclusion principle to be followed by fermions, we need these anti-commutators $$[a_{\lambda},a_{\lambda}]_+=0 $$ and $$[a_{\lambda}^{\dagger},a_{\lambda}^{\dagger}]_+=0 $$ Then ...
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3answers
208 views

Fermion vs. Bosons and particle vs. wave: is there a link?

I'm puzzled since several years on this basic aspect of quantum mechanics. Quantum theory is supposed to describe particle-wave symmetry of our world. It also describes our universe in term of bosons ...
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1answer
277 views

Atoms: boson or fermion? [duplicate]

The spin of fundamental particles determines if they are bosons or fermions. The atoms also have bosonic or fermionic behavior, for example $\require{mhchem}\ce{^4He}$ has bosonic and $\ce{^3He}$ has ...
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2answers
241 views

Fermions in the same state

I need some clarification of what is meant when someone says "fermions cannot occupy the same quantum state". Consider two bosons: $$\psi(\vec{r_1}, s_1, \vec{r_2}, s_2) = \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}} \left( ...
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1answer
121 views

Does the Fermi surface make sense for “Fermi liquids” with non-uniform charge density?

For a Fermi liquid, the Fermi momentum is determined by the singularity of the Green's function at $\omega=0$, i.e., $G(\omega=0,{\bf k}={\bf k}_F)\to\infty$. Suppose due to an external field or ...
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81 views

Classical wave equation from fermions

Every time there is a classical wave equation, the underlying system is bosonic. For example, em waves are made from photons, sound from phonons (technically quasi-particles), etc. What would be the ...
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1answer
142 views

Anticommutation relations and bispinor field

In a case of free Dirac field we have $$ \hat {H} = \int \epsilon_{\mathbf p}\left( \hat {a}^{+}_{s}(\mathbf p )\hat {a}_{s}(\mathbf p ) - \hat {b}_{s}(\mathbf p )\hat {b}_{s}^{+}(\mathbf p ) ...
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1answer
203 views

Why do we use spinors for describing fermions?

I.e., what properties of the spinors gives us a reason for using them for describing of wavefunctions of fermions?
4
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1answer
136 views

Helicity Representation of Massive Spinor

For massless spinors case we can decompose momentum into Weyl sub-parts as $$p = \lambda_{a}\tilde \lambda_{\dot a}.$$ But for the case of massive fermions can I do something like this? Decompose ...
5
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2answers
394 views

Why is the Fermi surface stable?

As a condensed matter physicist, I take it for granted that a Fermi surface is stable. But it is stable with respect to what? For instance, Cooper pairing is known as an instability of the Fermi ...
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3answers
2k views

Writing wave functions with spin of a system of particles

Suppose I have 2 fermions in a potential $V(x)$. Both particles are moving in one dimension: the $x$ axis. Then, neglecting the interaction between the particles, the spatial wave function of the ...
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2answers
171 views

Indistinguishability in Quantum Mechanics

When describing the defining characteristics of bosons and fermions, I have a problem with the idea of "label switching" - whereby you have the wavefunction for two particles and the particles' labels ...
4
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2answers
294 views

Imposing anti-commutation relations on fermionic quasi-particles

In many theories of CMT, we assume the nature of quasi-particles (without giving proper justifications). For example, we assume nature of quasi-particles to be fermionic in case of a interacting ...
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0answers
47 views

wavefunction antisymmetry as a limit of a deeper geometric constraint

Recently there was an interesting reformulation of Pauli principle in terms of polytopes: http://physics.aps.org/articles/v6/8 My question is, can this suggest that fermionicity is not a fundamental ...
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242 views

On the Axial Anomaly

I know that if we start with a massive theory, the chiral states $L$ and $R$ remain coupled to each other in the massless limit. Because a charged Dirac particle of a given helicity can make a ...
3
votes
1answer
204 views

Complex masses for Dirac and Weyl spinors

I'm trying understand how to rotate Dirac fields to absorb complex phases in masses. I have a few related questions: With Weyl spinors, I understand, $$ \mathcal{L} = \text{kinetic} + ...
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0answers
42 views

How does a state vector change under an exchange of a boson and a fermion?

How does a state vector change under an exchange of a boson and a fermion ? That's how is $\Psi_{\alpha,\beta}$ related to $\Psi_{\beta,\alpha}$ where $\alpha$ and $\beta$ are a boson and a fermion ...
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1answer
238 views

Is conservation of statistics logically independent of spin?

If the number of fermions is $n$, we expect the quantity $(-1)^n$ to be conserved, i.e., $n$ never changes between even and odd. This is known as conservation of statistics. In the normal context of ...