3
votes
1answer
29 views

How would Hamiltonian for several fermions with spin look?

All discussions of Pauli exclusion principle I read usually talked about antisymmetric wavefunctions, from which the princinple appears. But I would like to see a Hamiltonian for multiple fermions, ...
3
votes
2answers
138 views

Electrons, spins, and degeneracy

In an atom, two electrons can have the same set of $n,\ell,m$ quantum numbers as long as they have opposite spins. My introductory physics and chemistry courses have all introduced this as two ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Writing wave functions with spin of a system of particles

Suppose I have 2 fermions in a potential $V(x)$. Both particles are moving in one dimension: the $x$ axis. Then, neglecting the interaction between the particles, the spatial wave function of the ...
8
votes
1answer
224 views

Is conservation of statistics logically independent of spin?

If the number of fermions is $n$, we expect the quantity $(-1)^n$ to be conserved, i.e., $n$ never changes between even and odd. This is known as conservation of statistics. In the normal context of ...
8
votes
4answers
551 views

Huge confusion with Fermions and Bosons and how they relate to total spin of atom

I am supremely confused when something has spin or when it does not. For example, atomic Hydrogen has 4 fermions, three quarks to make a proton, and 1 electron. There is an even number of fermions, ...
7
votes
2answers
250 views

Is there record of a bosonic Stern-Gerlach measurement?

I cannot seem to find any peer-reviewed (or other) reference to an integer-spin Stern-Gerlach experiment. It shouldn't be too hard to do: just find you friendly neighbourhood Deuterium ion and shoot ...
14
votes
1answer
497 views

A reading list to build up to the spin statistics theorem

Wikipedia's article on the spin-statistics theorem sums it up thusly: In quantum mechanics, the spin-statistics theorem relates the spin of a particle to the particle statistics it obeys. The spin ...
6
votes
2answers
223 views

Basic Spin or Double Cover Experiment

We know that Spin is described with SU(2) and that SU(2) is a double cover of the rotation group SO(3). This suggests a simple thought experiment, to be described below. The question then is in three ...