3
votes
2answers
45 views

Is there any difference between massless Dirac fermions and Weyl fermions?

In graphene we call the low energy excitations around the Dirac point Dirac fermions, which are massless. Is this just by convention or is there any further differences between massless Dirac ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

matrix elements of the electronic molecular Hamiltonian between a hartree product and a Slater determinant

This may belong in Chemistry, but I thought I might try my luck here first. In Szabo's book, an exercise requires a proof that = (N!)^(1/2) * given that |K(HP)> is the Hartree product wave ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

Darboux theorem and the canonical decomposition of a two-fermion wave function

It is a classical theorem in quantum mechanics or quantum chemistry or quantum information that a two-fermion wave function has a beautiful canonical expansion: $$f(x_1, x_2) = \sum_{j=1}^N ...
2
votes
1answer
64 views

Hamiltonian for the Periodic Kitaev Model

The Hamiltonian for a system of spinless fermions on a 1D chain (with chemical potential $\mu=0$) is given by $$ H=-\sum_j\left( c^\dagger_{j+1} c_j+h.c.\right)+\Delta \sum_j \left( ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Would QM be detectable in a all boson universe

If there was a universe with the same laws as this one, but there were only bosons in it, would QM 'do anything'? Would there be any QM effects - such as an energy level (but that would require ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

For the two identical particles scattering, How can i identify two particles are bosons or fermions?

If two particles are scattered. How can i know those two particles are bosons or fermions?
3
votes
0answers
65 views

Can Pauli exclusion be described locally?

Is it possible, in principle, to define the exclusion principle in a "local" sense, as a property of the tangent space at a point, or a single fiber of a spin bundle? Or does it necessitate a global ...
1
vote
2answers
145 views

Is there is a reason for Pauli's Exclusion Principle?

As a starting quantum physicist I am very interested in reasons why does Pauli's Exclusion Principle works. I mean standard explanations are not quite satisfying. Of course we can say that is because ...
3
votes
2answers
200 views

Wavefunction of an electron

Electron is a spin $\frac{1}{2}$ particle, so needs 2-component wave function but the Dirac theory of electron is based on 4-component wave function, are all components of it independent or only two ...
5
votes
1answer
111 views

Are composite bosons always bosonic (e.g. the pion-cloud surrounding the nuclei)?

The $\pi$-meson is a boson, but consists of quark-antiquark (fermions). It seems to me that at some energy level (equivalently distance) the inner structure (fermionic nature of the quarks) of the ...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

Quantum Mechanisms for Isotope Fractionation

Are there any quantum properties that would enable isotope fractionation? For example, atoms with odd versus even numbers of neutrons are fermions and bosons, respectively. Has any work been done ...
3
votes
1answer
191 views

Minus Sign in Feynman Diagram

I've been reading these notes and I can't figure out the why on P.120, it is said that The fermionic statistics mean that the first diagram has an extra minus sign relative to the ψψ scattering ...
2
votes
2answers
139 views

Workaround to fermion sign problem?

My (rather incomplete) understanding of the NP-hard fermion/numerical sign problem is that it occurs when attempting to converge on a wavefunction for many-body fermion systems (for example, a small ...
2
votes
1answer
159 views

Almost identical fermions fighting for the same state

In quantum 101, we all learned that identical particles behave strangely, even in the absence of interactions: no two fermions can be in the same state, but bosons love to be in the same state. But ...
3
votes
3answers
570 views

Fermionic anti-commutation relations

For Pauli's exclusion principle to be followed by fermions, we need these anti-commutators $$[a_{\lambda},a_{\lambda}]_+=0 $$ and $$[a_{\lambda}^{\dagger},a_{\lambda}^{\dagger}]_+=0 $$ Then ...
1
vote
3answers
202 views

Fermion vs. Bosons and particle vs. wave: is there a link?

I'm puzzled since several years on this basic aspect of quantum mechanics. Quantum theory is supposed to describe particle-wave symmetry of our world. It also describes our universe in term of bosons ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Writing wave functions with spin of a system of particles

Suppose I have 2 fermions in a potential $V(x)$. Both particles are moving in one dimension: the $x$ axis. Then, neglecting the interaction between the particles, the spatial wave function of the ...
1
vote
2answers
164 views

Indistinguishability in Quantum Mechanics

When describing the defining characteristics of bosons and fermions, I have a problem with the idea of "label switching" - whereby you have the wavefunction for two particles and the particles' labels ...
2
votes
0answers
47 views

wavefunction antisymmetry as a limit of a deeper geometric constraint

Recently there was an interesting reformulation of Pauli principle in terms of polytopes: http://physics.aps.org/articles/v6/8 My question is, can this suggest that fermionicity is not a fundamental ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

How does a state vector change under an exchange of a boson and a fermion?

How does a state vector change under an exchange of a boson and a fermion ? That's how is $\Psi_{\alpha,\beta}$ related to $\Psi_{\beta,\alpha}$ where $\alpha$ and $\beta$ are a boson and a fermion ...
0
votes
1answer
292 views

Matrix representation for fermionic annihilation operator

My guess it should look something like this: $ c_\sigma = ...
1
vote
1answer
143 views

Quantum computing and Pauli exclusion principle?

Ok so I saw this video by Brian Cox where he explains how no 2 particles can have same energy level. Later I watched video "Was Brian Cox wrong?". Where they explained that he (probably on purpose) ...
1
vote
1answer
638 views

Is the Pauli exclusion principle as Brian Cox described it? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does the Pauli exclusion principle instantaneously affect distant electrons? If this rule works, could you not set up an experiment to test the theory (as described by ...
7
votes
2answers
283 views

Is there record of a bosonic Stern-Gerlach measurement?

I cannot seem to find any peer-reviewed (or other) reference to an integer-spin Stern-Gerlach experiment. It shouldn't be too hard to do: just find you friendly neighbourhood Deuterium ion and shoot ...
18
votes
2answers
691 views

Can bosons that are composed of several fermions occupy the same state?

It is generally assumed that there is no limit on how many bosons are allowed to occupy the same quantum mechanical state. However, almost every boson encountered in every-day physics is not a ...
3
votes
2answers
356 views

Has BCS Cooper pair condensate been observed in experiment?

Feshbach resonance in s-wave scattering states a BCS Cooper pair condensation at B-field just above the resonance where the scattering length a <0. Just wondering if the condensation has been ...
2
votes
2answers
618 views

How robust is Kramers degeneracy in real material?

Kramers theorem rely on odd total number of electrons. In reality, total number of electrons is about 10^23. Can those electrons be so smart to count the total number precisely and decide to form ...
3
votes
1answer
245 views

Understanding the Bose-Fermi dichotomy

I'm an amateur on a quest to understand QM. In various places (such as early in chapter III.4 of the Feynman Lectures) I have seen an argument that looks like it's trying to convince me that any class ...
0
votes
2answers
5k views

Degeneracy of Energy Levels for 2 identical particles in a One Dimensional box [closed]

i am studying for a physics exam and came across an exercise i cannot seem to crack. I have read through Feynmans lecture books & a lot of the internet but i am somewhat stuck. first the question, ...
2
votes
2answers
255 views

Why Pauli exclusion instead of electrons canceling out?

To quote Wikipedia, The Pauli exclusion principle is the quantum mechanical principle that no two identical fermions (particles with half-integer spin) may occupy the same quantum state ...
5
votes
2answers
132 views

Is ground energy of interacting fermions always higher that that of bosons?

Consider two systems, each made of $N$ particles. In both systems particles interact pairwise and the interaction is given by the same Hamiltonian for both systems. Any other constraints and/or ...
0
votes
0answers
462 views

Ground state energies with fermions of same spin?

Consider two non-interacting Fermions (half-integer spin) confined in a 'box'. Construct the anti-symmetric wavefunctions and compare the corresponding ground-state energies of the two systems; ...
2
votes
1answer
266 views

A particular notation about fermions

I am not sure that this notation is specific to supersymmetry theories but I ran into this while studying that. I see people talking of component fields of a chiral superfield as $\phi$ and ...
7
votes
3answers
260 views

Basic Spin or Double Cover Experiment

We know that Spin is described with $SU(2)$ and that $SU(2)$ is a double cover of the rotation group $SO(3)$. This suggests a simple thought experiment, to be described below. The question then is in ...