0
votes
1answer
14 views

Few particle fermion system wavefuction

Suppose I have 3 fermions($\left|\psi_1\right\rangle$, $\left|\psi_2\right\rangle$, $\left|\psi_3\right\rangle$) and a system with 3 states ( $\left|1\right\rangle$, $\left|2\right\rangle$, ...
7
votes
1answer
67 views

What causes Paulis Exclusion Principle?

Currently I'm taking an astrophysics class and has now come across electron degeneracy. As far as I understand, the reason why white dwarfs and such, does not collapse, is due to this, meaning that ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

Pauli's exclusion principle? [duplicate]

What is the idea behind Pauli s exclusion principle? Why should an electron or any particle having non integral spin obey this principle?
3
votes
1answer
126 views

Why do the anticommutation relations imply Fermi–Dirac statistics (Pauli Exclusion Principle) for the field quanta?

I was reading the following article Fermion FIelds and discovered the following passage not fully explained to me : It is these anticommutation relations that imply Fermi–Dirac statistics for ...
3
votes
1answer
50 views

How would Hamiltonian for several fermions with spin look?

All discussions of Pauli exclusion principle I read usually talked about antisymmetric wavefunctions, from which the princinple appears. But I would like to see a Hamiltonian for multiple fermions, ...
3
votes
0answers
67 views

Can Pauli exclusion be described locally?

Is it possible, in principle, to define the exclusion principle in a "local" sense, as a property of the tangent space at a point, or a single fiber of a spin bundle? Or does it necessitate a global ...
3
votes
2answers
320 views

Electrons, spins, and degeneracy

In an atom, two electrons can have the same set of $n,\ell,m$ quantum numbers as long as they have opposite spins. My introductory physics and chemistry courses have all introduced this as two ...
16
votes
3answers
584 views

Does black hole formation contradict the Pauli exclusion principle?

A star's collapse can be halted by the degeneracy pressure of electrons or neutrons due to the Pauli exclusion principle. In extreme relativistic conditions, a star will continue to collapse ...
1
vote
2answers
155 views

Is there is a reason for Pauli's Exclusion Principle?

As a starting quantum physicist I am very interested in reasons why does Pauli's Exclusion Principle works. I mean standard explanations are not quite satisfying. Of course we can say that is because ...
5
votes
1answer
115 views

Are composite bosons always bosonic (e.g. the pion-cloud surrounding the nuclei)?

The $\pi$-meson is a boson, but consists of quark-antiquark (fermions). It seems to me that at some energy level (equivalently distance) the inner structure (fermionic nature of the quarks) of the ...
1
vote
1answer
264 views

Physical implications behind the exchange antisymmetry condition of fermions

Explain the Physical implications behind the exchange antisymmetry condition of fermions. This condition forms the basis of the pauli principle but I can't find/understand what happens physically that ...
7
votes
2answers
253 views

Fermions in the same state

I need some clarification of what is meant when someone says "fermions cannot occupy the same quantum state". Consider two bosons: $$\psi(\vec{r_1}, s_1, \vec{r_2}, s_2) = \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}} \left( ...
2
votes
0answers
47 views

wavefunction antisymmetry as a limit of a deeper geometric constraint

Recently there was an interesting reformulation of Pauli principle in terms of polytopes: http://physics.aps.org/articles/v6/8 My question is, can this suggest that fermionicity is not a fundamental ...
1
vote
1answer
146 views

Quantum computing and Pauli exclusion principle?

Ok so I saw this video by Brian Cox where he explains how no 2 particles can have same energy level. Later I watched video "Was Brian Cox wrong?". Where they explained that he (probably on purpose) ...
1
vote
1answer
678 views

Is the Pauli exclusion principle as Brian Cox described it? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does the Pauli exclusion principle instantaneously affect distant electrons? If this rule works, could you not set up an experiment to test the theory (as described by ...
18
votes
2answers
722 views

Can bosons that are composed of several fermions occupy the same state?

It is generally assumed that there is no limit on how many bosons are allowed to occupy the same quantum mechanical state. However, almost every boson encountered in every-day physics is not a ...
2
votes
2answers
274 views

Why Pauli exclusion instead of electrons canceling out?

To quote Wikipedia, The Pauli exclusion principle is the quantum mechanical principle that no two identical fermions (particles with half-integer spin) may occupy the same quantum state ...