for questions about design, process, data, or analysis of experiments and observations.

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0
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1answer
266 views

Difference between Vernier constant and least count

What is the difference between the Vernier constant and least count of a Vernier caliper?
10
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2answers
1k views

Interpretation of “transition rate” in Fermi's golden rule

This is a question I asked myself a couple of years back, and which a student recently reminded me of. My off-the-cuff answer is wrong, and whilst I can make some hand-waving responses I'd like a ...
2
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0answers
23 views

What were the immediate consequences Yang-Lee work on Weak Interaction?

I am studying the history of Modern Physics and Yang-Lee earned their Nobel the next year after the Cobalt experiments. I am familiar with the chronology, but am not clear what those findings meant to ...
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0answers
22 views

Is there a difference in binding energy between a regular material and a doped one?

Say Silicon and boron doped silicon. Would the doping affect the binding energy? Could I see this in an XPS spectra?
5
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0answers
89 views

Textbook about the handiwork of a HEP analysis?

I'm wondering if there is a textbook that describes the handiwork of a particle physics analysis. There are a bunch of books about theory, about the experimental aspects like detectors, and about ...
2
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0answers
48 views

What is the requirements from an optical lab in terms of darkness

I am characterizing an optical lab and would like to know therefore what are the requirement from a standard optical lab in terms of ambient luminescence. In other words how dark should an optical lab ...
1
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0answers
86 views

Buoyancy Correction for a Kater Pendulum

Question: Consider a Kater pendulum: that is, a rod with two cylindrical masses at both ends, with a knife edge between the two masses and another between one ...
1
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1answer
158 views

How can one explain the Kelvin Water drop experiment without assuming the container to already possess a positive charge?

Kelvin Water Dropper experiment refers to the electrostatic generator invented by Lord Kelvin, which uses falling water to generate a voltage by electrostatic induction occurring between ...
-4
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1answer
66 views

Free 'fall' on an Inclined Plane

I guess we can say that two identical balls on the same inclined plane with different heigths reach the ground at the same time. So, who was the first one to observe it? ...
4
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1answer
163 views

Can force be transferred through objects in a chain to the last object without any displacement of objects in the middle?

sorry for terrible graphical representation, I did an experiment, i took 6 coins fixed 4 of them in one place by placing some real heavy objects on them , then i took a 5th coin placed it in the ...
5
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1answer
80 views

Determining source of neutrinos

An article in Science, Evidence for High-Energy Extraterrestrial Neutrinos at the IceCube Detector, claims to have detected 28 neutrinos from an unidentified extra-solar location that has yet to be ...
4
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2answers
64 views

How to realize long-range interaction of colds atom in an optical lattice?

In the Bose-Hubbard model of cold atoms in an optical lattice, we consider only the short-range interaction or on-site interaction. Is it possible to realize long-range interaction similar to Coulomb ...
1
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2answers
143 views

Are there moments in particle collision experiments where the particle beam is in open air?

I keep encountering the story of Anatoli Bugorski, who apparently got hit in the head by a proton beam at the U-70 PS in Protvino, Russia. I find it difficult to believe that this is actually ...
3
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4answers
276 views

how long do large hadron collider experiments take?

This travel stackexchange answer has kinda got me wondering... how long do experiments involving the large hadron collider usually take? I'd expect you run it for a few seconds and bam - higgs boson ...
2
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0answers
137 views

Problem with (grad school) physics education? [closed]

(Just to anticipate, having looked at other closed threads about physics education, I don't think this question should be too opinion based or broad.) Since being in a lab now for a couple years, ...
2
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3answers
235 views

The cooling curve of tin during solidification

I'm going to measure the freezing point of tin by recording the cooling curve. It sounds like a dull experiment because all I have to do is to heat up the tin, wait for it to cool, and the computer ...
8
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4answers
401 views

Doesn't the use of a thermometer alter the temperature of the system?

If I place a mercury thermometer in hot water, heat energy will transfer from the water to the mercury inside the thermometer. Will this continue until thermal equilibrium is reached and thus the ...
1
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2answers
84 views

what could generate a high-pitched whine in electronics where the frequency depends on the current?

So I was operating a Laue machine recently which generates x-rays and fires them at a sample, and I noticed that there was a high-pitched whine coming from the instrument (nothing abnormal, just ...
7
votes
1answer
146 views

What are the different ways to measure the spatial curvature of the universe?

Just what the question asks. Assuming the Friedmann-Rovertson-Walker (FRW) metric, what measurements can be performed to determine the spatial curvature of the universe.
4
votes
1answer
195 views

Propagation of uncertainty when integrating or differentiating

Lets say I have a polynomial $ax^4 +bx^3 +cx^2 +dx +e$ and the uncertainties on each coefficient. Now I need to calculate the tangent at some points as well as some areas under this curve. How would I ...
4
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2answers
538 views

Understanding the Eötvös experiment

The aim of the Eötvös experiment was to "prove" that for every (massive) particle, the quotient $\frac{m_g}{m_i}$ is constant, where $m_g$ is the gravitational mass and $m_i$ is the inertial mass. ...
3
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0answers
47 views

Converting impact speed to pressure magnitude

In explosive safety and stability testing, a drop test is commonly used to determine the sensitivity to impact. In the test, an impactor of known mass is dropped. The initial height varies throughout ...
1
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0answers
55 views

Long range repulsion in anomalous solids

As far as I know things like rocks, walls, rubber balls, polished tables etc. exert a short range repulsive force on other everyday objects that is responsible for hardness, softness, collisions, ...
2
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1answer
70 views

Dark matter detection

In the detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), which is the basis of dark matter, what is the use of the tank filled with liquid xenon? I mean, how does the releasing of photons ...
3
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1answer
150 views

How would one test the hypothesis of human free will? [closed]

In this context, I define free will to mean that a human's high-level actions (not the quantum states of his particles) are not determined, in the same sense that some quantum effects are not ...
3
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2answers
76 views

How can scintillation gamma-spectrometers work given that track length is different for different angles?

As far as I understand, the basic principle of gamma spectrometer is simple - gamma ray hits scintillator, it generates number of photons which roughly proportional to gamma ray energy. Then we need ...
0
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1answer
47 views

experimental verification of theory

Which equation of physics could we call the best verified one experimentally? Let us define "best verified" in the sense of smallest relative error of the predicted variables. Thank you.
1
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0answers
69 views

What could be the distribution of an explosion energy of a mining-grade and seismic exploration explosives?

Seismic exploration involves the excitation of seismic waves using the industrially made explosive charges. What could be the distribution of explosion energy of such a charges? My guess is that it ...
4
votes
1answer
149 views

Experiments looking for monopoles

Background: (skip it if you know it) In the easiest formulation of classical electromagnetism magnetic monopoles do not exist. In fact, the Maxwell's equation $\nabla \cdot \vec{B}=0$ implies (using ...
13
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1answer
122 views

Can a discrete dynode mass spec detector get “tired?”

In an electron multiplier (discrete dynode detector), one electron triggers the release of more electrons in a cascade. Is it possible that a "large" number of electrons hitting the detector can ...
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1answer
51 views

Temperature limit of the increase in heat

If the sun is the hottest known thing to humans is it possible to have a temperature greater than the sun?
6
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1answer
162 views

How long does it take for a chemostat to reach equilibrium?

A chemostat is a device to grow a cell culture in equilibrium. If we denote by $x$ the cell density and by $s$ the density of nutrients, we can write down the following equations (1): ...
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1answer
160 views

Seeing inside an atom

After seeing this photograph and reading this article : The First Image Ever of a Hydrogen Atom's Orbital Structure I was really happy to come to know that orbitals have actually been seen now, but ...
2
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0answers
59 views

Choice of X-ray scatterer in Compton effect

I am going to perform an experiment on Compton Scattering, and I am going to use an X-ray scatterer to scatter the incident X-rays. I have been instructed that Acrylic Glass slab are the best for this ...
2
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0answers
259 views

Theoretical or experimental violations of the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics? [closed]

Theoretical challenges to the 2nd Law? What are some the theoretical challenges to the 2nd Law? (cf. Čápek, Vladislav, and Daniel P. Sheehan. Challenges to the Second Law of Thermodynamics: Theory ...
2
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2answers
62 views

Measurements from inside conductors

We have known for some time now that when electric field is applied across any conducting shell, then electric field inside it would be zero. It also has some fantastic applications such as ...
0
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2answers
865 views

Homework Question Transformation Energy [closed]

A $1400kg$ car is approaching the hill shown in the figure at $14.0m/s$ when it suddenly runs out of gas. What is the car's speed after coasting down the other side? I think I have to use this ...
1
vote
1answer
127 views

How to detect gravitational waves?

Gravitational waves just have a little interaction with other particles. How can we detect such little influence on mass?
0
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2answers
167 views

1/r Counting Rate for Radiation Experiment

In an experiment performed in the lab, I want to justify that, when the width of the Geiger counter window is approximately the same size as the distance between the window and a mildly radioactive ...
0
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1answer
343 views

Inverse Square Law in Beta Radiation

Setup: A radioactive source is placed at alternating distances from a Geiger Counter. Counts per second for 10 different distances (each spaced 1 cm apart) were taken for preset times ranging from 200 ...
4
votes
2answers
164 views

From which side should I solder electrical feedthroughs into a vacuum flange?

I work on an experiment that requires electrical connections to a vacuum vessel, which is submerged in liquid helium (LHe). For sending the signals into the vessel, we use a feedthrough flange. I am ...
3
votes
1answer
157 views

Torque of a rotating fluid on a weighing scale

I was trying to do an experiment to measure torque (Moment force) of a rotating fluid. I placed a cylindrical vessel of dia-12cm with 1liter of water on a weighing scale and using a spoon I rotated ...
2
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0answers
23 views

Expression for combining several probabilities in a single discriminator

I'm doing an analysis of some experiment. Details are not very important, but I've stumbled on an expression that I cannot make sense of. I have several simultaneous measurements of a certain ...
0
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0answers
47 views

Has advanced radiation been detected experimentally?

I would like to know whether there has been an experimental detection of advanced radiation. I seem to recall reading about such an experiment but I can't find any reference to it on the interwebs so ...
0
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0answers
39 views

What are some common errors when it comes to measuring hall voltage of a semiconductor?

What are some common errors when it comes to measuring hall voltage of a semiconductor? I've thought of two errors: Adjusting the potentiometer so that the width of the conductor would start with 0 ...
1
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0answers
48 views

Present experimental status of Moffat's Modified theory of Gravity

Modified theories of Gravity have been discussed before in this 2-year old question, Are modified theories of gravity credible? I was going through Moffat's modified gravity, given in ...
1
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1answer
69 views

Curve Fitting and Multiple Experiments

Say I do an an experiment 5 times, each of which gives you a list of data points. Do I fit a curve to each one separately and then average the parameters and their uncertainties? Or do I take the ...
1
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4answers
377 views

Experimental evidence of Pauli's exclusion principle

A fermion is described by a set of quantum numbers, this set of numbers lead us to a unique wave function. If two fermions are described by the same wave function (violating the Pauli's exclusion ...
1
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0answers
103 views

Thermal Conductivity Graph

This is our first time (as an engineer) seeing this type of graph that we can't interpret. This is a rough comparision of thermal conductivity from the Wiki page. ...
1
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1answer
58 views

Testing the speed of gravitational waves in superfluids

Ok. Light can be slowed down in superfluids. I would like to know whether if a Cavendish like experiment could be possible within inside superfluids i.e, to rotate two balls such that to observe their ...