for questions about design, process, data, or analysis of experiments and observations.

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2
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1answer
181 views

Testing General Relativity

Ever since Einstein published his GR theory in 1916, there have been numerous experimental tests to confirm its correctness--and has passed with flying colors. NASA and Stanford have just announced ...
4
votes
1answer
271 views

How 'pure' is liquid nitrogen?

I've been doing an experiment using liquid nitrogen, and am aware that pouring it into different containers gives a chance for other gases to liquify and contaminate it; what's a good estimate for the ...
9
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2answers
773 views

Has quantum entanglement been demonstrated to be able to take place over infinite distances?

In my poor understanding of quantum physics, quantum entanglement means that certain properties of one of two 'entangled' quantum particles can lead to change over infinitely large distances when the ...
4
votes
1answer
3k views

Quantum Entanglement: how to generate 2 entangled particles?

I get quantum entanglement but I don't quite get how one would go about generating two complementary particles that are entangled (a photon and its entangled sibling, an electron and its entangled ...
7
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2answers
253 views

What are the main differences between $p p$ and $p \bar p$ colliders

I know that it is somehow related to the parton distribution functions, allowing specific reactions with gluons instead of quarks and anti-quarks, but I would really appreciate more detailed answers ! ...
5
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2answers
414 views

What does the LHC do afterwards?

Astronomical telescopes are now mega projects and cost $1Bn and although they are pitched to solve the current interest of the day they are general purpose machines and with upgrades and new ...
4
votes
1answer
106 views

Where can I get the most accurate measurements of parton distribution functions?

Where would I look to get the most accurate experimental values of parton distribution functions for the proton? I know these functions aren't measured directly, but I'd basically like to find a fit ...
-1
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2answers
527 views

Where can I find the measured magnetic moments of the quarks?

I read that the magnetic moment of the proton can be expressed as the sum of the magnetic moments of the three quarks like $\mu_p = \frac{4}{3}\mu_u - \frac{1}{3}\mu_d$. But I couldn't find a table ...
1
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1answer
152 views

Spilling a cup of coffee

I've observed this many times when I spill coffee, It gets attracted towards the cup or the vessel. why is this so? Which is the force acting? (Hope you understood my question).
5
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2answers
233 views

What reflective media do laser shows use?

I am having a hard time in finding out what exact light media laser shows use. I am trying to build a laser show myself. I know that the laser light is reflected off these particles in such a way that ...
15
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2answers
2k views

Did the researchers at Fermilab find a fifth force?

Please consider the publication Invariant Mass Distribution of Jet Pairs Produced in Association with a W boson in $p\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV by the CDF-Collaboration, ...
8
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5answers
221 views

How to communicate institutional knowledge in a big physics collaboration?

I am a graduate student in a large experimental physics collaboration. Newcomers to the collaboration invariably complain about excessive use of jargon and insufficient documentation as barriers to ...
7
votes
2answers
164 views

How to reproduce highway vibration?

I would like to test my hardware under vibration that can appear on a highway gantry. If someone has a model of such vibration. i.e period and amplitude. In my lab I have a motor that can be ...
7
votes
2answers
366 views

Fairly Broad Spectrum Light Source Options

I tried this sight before to find filtering options and got fantastic results, so let's try again! I am setting up an experiment that requires light of two different frequencies (445nm and 350nm). ...
10
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2answers
3k views

How do we know that some radioactive materials have a half life of millions or even billions of years?

If a radioactive material takes a very long time to decay, how is its half life measured or calculated? Do we have to actually observe the radioactive material for a very long time to extrapolate its ...
3
votes
1answer
248 views

PNMR, Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Experiment

I am writing a lab report for class on PNMR experiment that we did. How come in this experiment we don't worry about the electron spins in our sample? Aren't the electrons affected by the PNMR machine ...
4
votes
2answers
230 views

CPT violation and how could quark masses differ from anti-quark masses?

A recent experimental paper measures a difference between the top quark and anti-top quark masses: Fermilab-Pub-11-062-E, CDF Collaboration, Measurement of the mass difference between $t$ and ...
1
vote
1answer
156 views

Are there notable cases of anomalies in the mass-decay rate relationship?

As a general rule of thumb, massive particles (both composite and fundamental) tend to decay rapidly through the weak force, while less massive particles tend to be more stable. Hence, taus are ...
6
votes
5answers
490 views

What Would be the Experimental Signature of Composite Leptons?

So far, the quarks and leptons appear to be fundamental particles. But they're complicated enough that there's always been some speculation that they might be composite. What experimental evidence ...
9
votes
3answers
419 views

Can the Kramers–Kronig relation be used to correct transfer function measurements?

In experimental physics, we often make measurements of linear transfer functions; these are complex-valued functions of frequency. If the underlying system is causal, then the transfer function must ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Active gravitational mass of the electron

In PSE here electrons are added to a sphere and gravitational modifications are expected. My question is: Is there any experiment that show that a negatively charged object is source of a stronger ...
1
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2answers
251 views

Double slit experiment and perforated walls' properties

I have a doubt about how double slit experiment is made. Let's think about the perforated wall, what are the requirement for it? Can a photographic plate could be used as a wall ? I see a problem ...
1
vote
2answers
330 views

What's inside the slit in double slit experiment?

If double slit experiment is done in a environment with air, then slits could also contain air made up of (approx. 80% nitrogen, 20% oxygen), then there is not empty space inside the slit. How can it ...
13
votes
5answers
524 views

Matter-Antimatter Asymmetry in Experiments?

As I hope is obvious to everyone reading this, the universe contains more matter than antimatter, presumably because of some slight asymmetry in the amounts of the two generated during the Big Bang. ...
4
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5answers
520 views

Neutrino versus Anti-neutrino Detection

Is there a that detection method in use that can distinguish between a neutrino from its anti-neutrino?
2
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2answers
129 views

Observation of cosmological topological defects

Are there any projects/experiments running for the observation of topological defects (domain walls, monopoles, etc)? Are there any past/canceled or future such projects?
3
votes
1answer
168 views

Solar neutrino predictions

The solar neutrino problem has been "solved" by discovering that neutrinos have mass and they oscillate. So how accurate are now our predictions about the number and types of solar neutrinos that ...
7
votes
3answers
353 views

Has every possible interaction between elementary particles been observed?

There are some interactions that are forbidden by conservation laws, e.g. an electron cannot turn into a positron by conservation of charge and a photon cannot turn into a positron electron pair by ...
2
votes
2answers
571 views

Is there a different behavior between proton and antiproton beams at the Tevatron?

This question has its origin to the reference on the Aegis experiment at CERN where they aim to produce super cooled antihydrogen and detect whether its reaction to gravity is negative. It set me ...
2
votes
1answer
488 views

Astronomical detection significance from magnitude error

At this website: http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/swift/analysis/threads/uvot_thread_afterglows.html The passage at the bottom states that a V-band magnitude of 17.62, with an error $\pm$0.02 is a ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Why is the bispectrum not commonly used in experimental physics?

Power spectra, coherence spectra, and linear transfer functions are ubiquitous tools of experimental physics. However, our instruments often retain small nonlinear effects which can contaminate ...
379
votes
20answers
139k views

Cooling a cup of coffee with help of a spoon

During the breakfast with my colleagues, a question popped into my head: What is the fastest method to cool a cup of coffee, if your only available instrument is a spoon? A qualitative answer would ...
5
votes
8answers
690 views

Example of a time varying function which can be easily measured

My sister is in 10th grade. She doesn't seem to understand the concept of time varying functions (current, light, sound wave forms etc). I explained her in easiest possible terms. She got it but not ...
2
votes
2answers
497 views

Does string theory provide quantitative experimental predictions? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What experiment would disprove string theory? We carefully observe things, observe patterns and then build theories that predict. String theory is frequently ...
11
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7answers
3k views

Experimental evidence of a fourth spatial dimension?

As human beings, we observe the world in which we live in three dimensions. However, it is certainly theoretically possible that more dimensions exist. Is there any direct or indirect evidence ...
35
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13answers
9k views

Why is cold fusion considered bogus?

Cold fusion is being mentioned a lot lately because of some new setup that apparently works. This is an unverified claim. See for example: ...
11
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8answers
1k views

What is the name of the principle saying it is meaningless to talk/ask questions that can not be measured/tested?

Watching quantum mechanics lectures and it was mentioned that it is pointless/meaningless to try to talk/question things that can not be tested/measured. Is this a principle? And if so what is it's ...
9
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2answers
760 views

ATLAS and CMS calorimeters

I was reading this interesting recent review on arxiv about particle identification: Particle Identification In figure 2, there is an interesting comparison between the CMS and ATLAS calorimeter ...
7
votes
3answers
267 views

Basic Spin or Double Cover Experiment

We know that Spin is described with $SU(2)$ and that $SU(2)$ is a double cover of the rotation group $SO(3)$. This suggests a simple thought experiment, to be described below. The question then is in ...
13
votes
6answers
4k views

What is the world's biggest Schrodinger cat?

How big is it by a truly quantum measurement? I am thinking of comparing Science magazines "Breakthrough of the Year" (BYOT) with the Zeilinger buckyball. The BYOT is a piezoelectric mechanical ...
6
votes
0answers
229 views

Predicting the ratio of translational diffusion coefficients for a sphere and a sheet

Imagine that I have a spherical particle of molecular weight $M$, volume $V$, and some experimentally observed center-of-mobility translational diffusion coefficient $D_{sphere}$ in water. I take ...
1
vote
1answer
411 views

Poynting Vectors and Feigel Effects

There is a surprising number of papers seriously discussing the "feigel effect" This has been linked to the Abraham-Minkowski controversy also here. Although there are good discussions picking apart ...
5
votes
4answers
460 views

How would you design an experiment to grok optical phenomena?

I've been toying with the idea of making a 3D scanner that uses an IR distance sensor to find position vectors of an object in space and then translates that into a 3D computer model. One of the ...
7
votes
2answers
604 views

How do electrons interact if one of them had just exited the two slits of the double-slit experiment?

Consider the following experiment: a double-slit set-up for firing electrons one at a time. Let's now add a second electron (orange), which is fired parallel to the first one, but in the opposite ...
4
votes
1answer
272 views

How to count quarks using Deep Inelastic Scattering?

The Wikipedia article on deep inelastic scattering suggests that the experiment shows baryons have three point of deflections (corresponding to three quarks) and mesons have two points of deflection. ...
36
votes
11answers
13k views

How did Newton discover his second law?

I've always assumed/been told that Newton's 2nd law is an empirical law — it must be discovered by experiment. If this is the case, what experiments did Newton do to discover this? Is it related to ...
5
votes
2answers
576 views

Experiments that measure the time a gas takes to reach equilibrium

If you take two ideal gases at different temperatures, and allow them to share energy through heat, they'll eventually reach a thermodynamic equilibrium state that has higher entropy than the ...
12
votes
4answers
430 views

Do high/low pass lenses exist?

For an experiment I will hopefully be soon conducting at Johns Hopkins I need two different lenses. The first needs to allow all wavelengths above 500 nm to pass (thus a high pass filter) and cut off ...
4
votes
3answers
551 views

Have the Rowan University “hydrino” findings been replicated elsewhere?

In 2009, Rowan University released a paper claiming to replicate Blacklight Power's results on energy generation using hydrino states of the hydrogen atom. The paper appears to describe the procedure ...
18
votes
5answers
4k views

Does red shift evidence necessarily imply that the universe started from a singularity?

We are taught that the universe began as a singularity - an infinitely small and infinitely dense point. At the beginning of time there was a 'Big Bang' or, more accurately, 'Inflation'. The main ...