A repulsive force that exists in quantum mechanics between identical fermions due to the Pauli exclusion principle.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
1answer
80 views

Could someone explain how antisymmetric position states and symmetric spin states work in an atom?

I'm reading Griffiths QM 2nd ed and he talks about how all fermions are antisymmetric in nature. Later he talks about how exchange forces with identical particles. He states that because fermions are ...
10
votes
3answers
687 views

Why don't photons attract

I was reading in Griffiths, Quantum mechanics 2nd Edition about the Exchange forces, so it says that identical bosons attract each other, like the case of Einstein Bose condensates, identical fermions ...
1
vote
0answers
14 views

Is Blatt-Weisskopf's treatment of nuclear forces still relevant today?

As in the title, is the treatment of nuclear forces by Blatt and Weisskopf, as in Chapter III of "Theoretical Nuclear Physics", still relevant today, especially with regard to the role of exchange ...
1
vote
1answer
105 views

many body wavefunction and exchange correlation

Everywhere I ready about HF or DFT the term exchange correlation functional comes up. I have a couple of fundamental questions about these: 1) Books say that the correlation energy is the difference ...
2
votes
0answers
86 views

Mathematical form of the de facto repulsive “force” associated with the Pauli Exclusion Principle [duplicate]

One of the principles of General Relativity is that test objects follow a geodesic unless otherwise acted upon by a force. From this perspective, it is clear that physicists, consciously or ...
0
votes
2answers
58 views

Can both types of W boson be responsible for a neutron-neutrino interaction?

My textbooks lists the exchange particle for a neutron-neutrino interaction as being the W- boson. Is this the only option, or can it also be a W+ boson? Nothing jumps out at me that would suggest it ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Outside of string theory, can exchange particles be understood as being one-dimensional?

I'm pretty new to quantum, without any formal education therein, so forgive my general layman ignorance when I ask how it is that point-like exchange particles can be modeled in Feynman diagrams as ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

spin conservation in exchange polarization process

Exchange polarization is the process by which spin is transferred between an electron beam and a system of polarized atoms (with a single valence spin). The process occurs as a result of the Pauli ...
2
votes
2answers
335 views

Exchange operator in terms of rotation operator

I have studied about exchange operators and rotation operators and I know that an exchange between 2 particles in a combined state is the same as rotating each particle 180 degrees (according to http:/...
2
votes
1answer
120 views

Is there a point interaction model of the electron?

Is there a point interaction model of the electron? Is there a point interaction model of the electron? I imagine something like $\propto(\bar \psi\psi)^2$ (edited). Is such a thing in use? Since I ...
1
vote
1answer
153 views

Does spin alone have any effect on the physical interactions of particles?

In Hartree-Fock theory the time-independent electronic energy of a single (restricted) determinant electronic wavefunction consists of one electron terms, $h_{ii}$, Coulomb interaction energies, $J_{...
11
votes
1answer
5k views

Simple description of exchange interaction?

What is a simple bare-bones description of exchange interaction between two electrons? For instance, it seems to me that the only necessary ingredients are the Coulomb interaction and the requirement ...
2
votes
1answer
514 views

electron hole exchange

If exchange is an interaction between indistinguishable particles, how can there be an exchange interaction between electrons and holes? I see mention of e-h exchange often in the literature.
20
votes
2answers
6k views

Are all electrons identical?

Why should two sub-atomic (or elementary particle) - say electrons need to have identical static properties - identical mass, identical charge? Why can't they differ between each other by a very ...
3
votes
2answers
423 views

Example of a wavefunction that cannot be represented by a single Slater determinant

I know that in general, interacting fermions cannot necessarily be described by a single Slater determinant. Can anyone provide a simple example of a state that has no such representation?
4
votes
1answer
566 views

How would Kohn-Sham orbitals differ from 'true' elecron wavefunctions?

How would the non-interacting electron orbitals from a perfect DFT solution for a given potential shape differ from the 'true' electron wavefunctions? Or can you only really talk about the total ...
2
votes
2answers
254 views

existing bounds on maximum density achieved by a Bose condensate

As we know, fermions are subject to exchange interactions that limit the densities they can achieve. However bosons (simple or composite) are not constrained by this, which implies physical phenomena ...