An event horizon is a type of boundary such that any information past this boundary is inaccessible to the observer it is defined for. Common examples are the Schwarzschild radius of a black hole (which is defined commonly for all observers outside this radius) and the cosmological even horizon ...

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Dipping a Dyson Ring below the event horizon

The basic assumption about inescapability beyond the Event Horizon is that the necessary escape speed (orbital speed) would exceed speed of light, therefore no object can achieve it. Now, would it be ...
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What happens when Dark Matter comes in contact with the event horizon of a large Black Hole

Josh Hill, 9, Oakdale Elementary has always talked Theory of Relativity and Astrophysics etc., I can answer most but lately he has stumped me and has been begging me to ask a pro, so here it is.... ...
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Why “light cones” have different shapes near black holes?

There is theory that light cone shape does not depend on the reference frame in which it is viewed. So why we draw light cones near black hole differently? I thought that if I am observing (from the ...
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What is the relationship between the Schwarzschild radius and Black hole Singularity?

What is the relationship between the Schwarzschild radius and Black hole Singularity? Can the Planck length be the length of singularity? Or is the length of the Schwartzschild shorter than the ...
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Question about Black Holes

I'm not a physicist so I'm sorry if this question is stupid from your point of view, but I believe it's not. Let us make this thought experiment: Take a black hole and put near it (but at a safety ...
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Do all event horizons emit radiation?

So, the event horizon around a black hole emits radiation, and Rindler space is full of thermal energy. I guess I have two questions- does the Unruh effect have anything to do with radiation from the ...
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A two-dimensional event horizon?

Today, I came across an article which says that the Universe began with the collapse of a 4-dimensional [spatial] Universe. Well, I don't know if there's any way to confirm these like it is with all ...
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Why are black holes special?

A black hole is where it's mass is great enough that light can't escape at a radius above the surface of the mass? I've been told that strange things happen inside the event horizon such as ...
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Hawking Temperature of the BTZ Black Hole

The metric of the BTZ Black Hole is given by $$ ds^2 = - N^2 dt^2 + N^{-2} dr^2 +r^2(d\phi + N^\phi dt)^2 $$ with $$ N^2 = -M+ \frac{r^2}{l^2} + \frac{J^2}{4 r^2}, \ \ \ \ \ \ N^\phi = ...
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When do you see the second horizon as you fall into a black hole?

Suppose you are a massive observer falling into a Schwarzschild black hole (geodesically or not, it shouldn't matter). At any point on your personal worldline you can receive light signals from the ...
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Event horizons in Newtonian mechanics and Galilean relativity

I've been revisiting classical physics (in the sense of Newtonian mechanics and Galilean relativity) and I was thinking why can't we have an event horizon in classical physics? Is it because the ...
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Cosmic event horizon

I had a question regarding cosmic event horizon. Let's say that a far away solar system has just crossed the cosmic event horizon due to the expansion of the universe. In that solar system let us ...
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Misconceptions about the universe - Hubble Sphere

I recently watched Veritasium's (excellent) video "Misconceptions about the Universe". However, he said something (at 2min 25s) which I think is wrong. Can somebody please clarify this one way or the ...
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Is the difference between an event horizon and a singularity merely perspective?

I know the question has been asked about how an event horizon is distinguishable from a singularity given that time must come to a stop at the event horizon, but I haven't been fully satisfied by the ...
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Can light be launched outwards from an event horizon? [duplicate]

There's something which I don't quite get about black holes and event horizons (feel free to tell me if I got something completely backwards at any step along the way): Say we have a singularity and ...
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If charged particles always attach to black hole event horizons, how can ordinary matter fall in?

(A friend at work kindly loaned me loaned me his copy of Kip S Thorne's "Black Holes & Time Warps". This may have been ill-advised... :) BH&TW 1994 paperback p.410 Figure 11.5: ... all ...
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event horizons are untraversable by observers far from the collapse?

Consider this a followup question of this one In the classical schwarszchild solution with an eternal black hole, the user falls through the event horizon in finite local time, but this event does ...
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What is really going on in the ergosphere of a Kerr black hole?

Considering the Kerr metric with $GM>a$, we can compute 2 event horizons: $r_\pm=GM\pm \sqrt{G^2M^2-a^2}$ These event horizons are null surfaces, and trajectories are timelike between $r_+$ and ...
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Apparent Horizon vs. Event Horizon

I understand that an apparent horizon is the boundary of trapped codimension-2 surfaces in the spacetime (surfaces from which both ingoing and outgoing light rays must be converging). Meanwhile, an ...
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How can a black hole increase mass? [duplicate]

As far as I know, the time dilation at the event horizon of a black hole is infinite, so everything falls asymptotically towards, but never reaching, the horizon for an outside observer. How then can ...
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Why do black holes have a finite size? [duplicate]

There is one piece of information that makes me wonder why finitely sized black holes are even possible: to an observer from afar, anything that approaches a black hole's event horizon is never ...
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Why Hawking radiation emission rate inversely proportional to black hole mass? [duplicate]

The rate of Hawking radiation emission increases as the mass of the black hole decreases, what I don't understand is that if the emission method is related to zero-point energy particles appearing and ...
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Force of gravity in the event horizon [closed]

I recently posted a question about black holes and gravity (this) and I discovered the Schwarzschild radius: $r_s=\frac{2GM}{c^2}$. I thought with a friend of mine about the actual force (in Newtons) ...
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Do black holes exert an infinite amount of energy at the event horizon?

An interesting thought crossed my mind when reading about Hawkings' apparent horizon theory. If we assume that event horizons do actually exist, it would seem that black holes violate basic laws of ...
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Can a black hole actually grow, from the point of view of a distant observer? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Black hole formation as seen by a distant observer I've read in several places that from the PoV of a distant observer it will take an infinite amount of time for new ...
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Another layman blackhole question, pulling one end of a string out from behind the event horizon

No long explanation is needed, What would happen if I were to allow one end of a rope to fall past the event horizon of a black hole while I held the other end? Would I be able to pull it out? Would ...
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What happens to objects pulled in by black hole? [closed]

What happens to the particles/elements/objects that sink into the gravitational pull and ultimately go to the interior part of a black hole? If, according to popular notion, it is crushed by the ...
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How much extra distance to an event horizon?

How much extra distance would I have to travel through space to get from Earth to a stellar mass event horizon? (compared to the same point in space without a black hole)
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Black Hole Growth

When a black hole increases in size by engulfing matter, does this matter fall into the event horizon or does it just rotate around the accretion disk? EDIT: Clarified the beginning of the question. ...
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Do particles in a black hole stay in constant orbit?

Would particles behave the same way as a satellite orbiting earth, only far more compact and rapid correlating to the gravitational force of the black hole?
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Is a black hole a 3D hole? And doesn't it pull into the 4th dimension?

Hear me out here please: A body on a line (a 1-D world) causes a warp in the line, i.e. a curve (2-D) A body on a plane (a 2-D world) "sinks", causing a warp in the plane, i.e. a pit (3-D) Then does ...
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How to derive the Schwarzschild radius? [duplicate]

I know that the Schwarzschild radius is given by $$r=\frac{2GM}{c^{2}}.$$ but I never seen a derivation for this equation. 1- Does anyone know how to derive this equation from general relativity? ...
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Is the event horizon also the boundary region of the mass contained by a black hole?

I was recently playing around with classic Newtonian mechanics and calculated that the Earth would have to be compressed to a spherical region of $8.8 \ mm$ (Its Schwarzchild radius) to turn its ...
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Does inbound light slow down (for an external observer) as it approaches the event horizon?

As I understand, for an external observer nothing even enters a black hole because it takes infinite time in his frame of reference for something to actually reach the event horizon. I also read that ...
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Is relativistic event horizon half of Newtonian event horizon?

Is Relativistic event horizon half of Newtonian event horizon? relativistic escape velocity formula (from $m\phi=E-E_0$) is $v_e=\sqrt{2\phi-(\frac{\phi}{c})^2}$ and the Newtonian version of the ...
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Is black hole bright at center?

As we know that light photon cannot escape the gravity of black hole so I was thinking that if that is the surface of the black hole would be bright as all the photons would be there only. Am I right ...
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Where is the event horizon in a black hole?

At the beginning I thought that the event horizon coincides with the surfaces, but then making a new name when you could just call it surface would seem a bit pointless. Then where is the event ...
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When a neutron star accumulates enough mass, does a black hole start at its center?

With less dense bodies, such as the earth and the sun, the center has less gravity/density (since there's an equal amount of mass surrounding the center, pulling out on it from all directions). Does ...
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Interpretation of black hole area

I'm studying properties of Kerr spacetimes and a lot of fuss is made about area of BH. It is defined to be integral of area element on event horizon $r=r_+$, $t=const.$ where $r_+$ is radial ...
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Is there a horizontal event horizon on a spinning black hole?

It seems that most of the information one reads about black holes theorises that they are not spinning. The theories then describe all matter approaching a black hole as being absorbed by it. Wouldn't ...
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Photons emitted at the event horizon?

While looking through the questions, a came across a section about black holes. I immediately though; what would happen if an atom is orbiting a black hole and emitted a photon perpendicular to the ...
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How does negative energy from Hawking Radiation cause a Black Hole to shrink? [duplicate]

Hello this is expanding upon a question that was previously asked on stack exchange that I linked below. From what I understand of Black Holes is that overtime Hawking Radiation results in the Black ...
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What actually happens to a light ray on a Schwarzschild black hole horizon?

I know the Schwarzschild event horizon is a null surface generated by null geodesics. But what does that actually mean in terms of the path of a light ray that reaches it? Does that mean the geodesic ...
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Conditions at black hole's event horizon

This question had, at least partially, been discussed here before, but I feel that the record has not been set straight. There seem to be lack of agreement regarding conditions (like gravitational ...
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What is the temperature of the event horizon?

In a discussion with my son about absolute zero, we arrived at the conclusion that the event horizon might be the place to look, as it "absorbs?" all energy, including light. Found this in the ...
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Does a wormhole on the event horizon keep working?

Recently the discovery of how to build a magnetic wormhole has been all over the news. These wormholes tunnel magnetic fields instantly from one point to another point. (Although the current model is ...
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Event horizon from the metric

Let us suppose we have a metric of this form $$ds^2=-A(r)dt^2+\frac{dr^2}{B(r)}+r^2d\Omega^2$$ In all documents I can read, I've seen that the event horizon is defined by considering $A(r)=0$ But I ...
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Photons at Event Horizon

The escape velocity at event horizon of a black hole is same as speed of light, So this questions is not about all photons travelling into a black hole, but for those which are tangential to the event ...
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At what speed will objects hit a singularity? [duplicate]

I have read in numerous places like here that an object in free fall into a black hole will be travelling the speed of light when it passes the event horizon. How is it possible to go this fast? ...
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How can a black hole have spin?

How is it possible, or even meaningful, to say that a black hole has spin? (Tangentially, if the singularity is assumed to be a point, it must have either zero or infinite angular momentum, in both ...