An event horizon is a type of boundary such that any information past this boundary is inaccessible to the observer it is defined for. Common examples are the Schwarzschild radius of a black hole (which is defined commonly for all observers outside this radius) and the cosmological even horizon ...

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Taking selfies while falling, would you be able to notice a horizon before hitting a singularity?

I am generally interested in the role of "pings"(0a) between participants (a.k.a. "signal roundtrips"(0b), as familiar for instance from Synge's "five point curvature detector") in the determination ...
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Does gravity affect quantum fluctuations? [closed]

Empty space is filled with quantum fluctuations. My question is, since space is affected by the amount of matter contained in it (based on General Relativity), does gravity affect quantum ...
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171 views

Are different frequencies of light lensed differently during gravitational lensing a bit like refraction?

So I was wondering about the event horizon on a black hole. And wondering if the point of no return for radio waves vs gamma rays would be different. I guess the logic being, since gamma rays have ...
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Another faster-than-light question

Imagine we have something very heavy (i.e supermassive black hole) and some object that we can throw with 0.999999 speed of light (i.e proton). We are throwing our particle in the direction of hole. ...
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What happens when a black hole dies?

It just vanishes into space leaving nothing behind or does it expel some material? Also, talking more about black holes, as far as i understand the term "temperature", it is defined by the amount of ...
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Black hole formation as seen by a distant observer [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How can anything ever fall into a black hole as seen from an outside observer? Is black hole formation observable for a distant observer in finite amount of time? ...
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191 views

How does nature prevent transient toroidal event horizons?

How does nature prevent transient toroidal event horizons?.. and does it really need to? Steps to construct a (transient) toroidal event horizon in a asymptotically flat Minkowski spacetime: take a ...
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When does a singularity start to exist during a black hole formation?

Excuse me if the question is naïve. I am not a physicist. Let's imagine formation of a black hole from a homogeneous collapsing star. At certain moment when enough of matter is inside of a small ...
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What do you feel when crossing the event horizon?

I have heard the claim over and over that you won't feel anything when crossing the event horizon as the curvature is not very large. But the fundamental fact remains that information cannot pass ...
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Can gravitational waves escape from inside of black holes? [duplicate]

I understand that light cannot escape from inside of an event horizon because the spacetime curvature is too warped for photons to escape. On the other hand, gravitational waves are ripples of ...
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If nothing ever falls into a black hole, why is there a puzzle about information?

From an outside perspective, nothing can ever pass the event horizon. It just scooches asymptotically close to the event horizon. So (from our perspective on earth), when a black hole reduces in ...
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Could a ship equipped with Alcubierre drive theoretically escape from a black hole?

Could a ship equipped with Alcubierre drive theoretically escape from a black hole? Also, could it reach parts of the universe that are receding faster than the speed of light from us?
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Non-coinciding event horizon and apparent horizon

Proposition: the event horizon and the apparent horizon of a black hole always coincide. As a reminder: the event horizon is defined as the boundary of the closure of the causal past of future ...
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How does the evaporation of a black hole look for a distant observer?

Let's assume an observer looking at a distant black hole that is created by collapsing star. In observer frame of reference time near black hole horizon asymptotically slows down and he never see ...
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Closed timelike curves in the region beyond the ring singularity in the maximal Kerr spacetime

The region beyond the ring singularity in the maximal Kerr spacetime is described as having closed timeline curves. Why and/or how is the question. Now if you look a Kruskal-Szkeres Diagram (or a ...
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How do we expect distance measurements to compare inside and outside the event horizon of a black hole?

I've read that as one approaches the event horizon of a black hole, time is dilated relative to time measured farther away from the event horizon (clocks tick slower near the event horizon). I've ...
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How close can an observer approach the black hole in an unpowered flyby without falling into it?

In classical mechanics by choosing the right trajectory you can approach a planet arbitrarily closely, if there is no atmosphere or anything to slow you down, you can approach the surface then fly ...
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Definition of event horizon - Gravity around blackholes [closed]

Put simpler: A black hole is surrounded by a 'sphere' where, to an outside observer. the speed of light is (near) zero. What is the radius of that 'sphere' (for a non-rotating black hole) and how ...
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Size of black hole so large that I could pass event horizon without dying from tidal forces?

Were I to fall towards a typical black hole, the tidal forces would rip me apart well before I got to the event horizon. However, if a black hole were big enough, I could enter the event horizon ...
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What is the current radius of cosmological event horizon?

Doing some crude calculations (using the value of $H_0$ at this point of time only, since it is time dependent but not distance dependent thanks to Johannes answer) what is the radius of cosmological ...
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How long can a particle survive inside of the horizon of a black hole?

By examining the causal structure of a Schwarzschild black hole, one can see that a particle in region II is unable to escape to $r=\infty$. Such diagrams do not show, however, how long a particle ...
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What happens to the wavelength/frequency of a photon as it passes through an event horizon?

I've asked a similar question about photons and black holes but wanted to rephrase it more specifically, so here goes... Ever since I learned how a photon's wavelength and frequency are indivisibly ...
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Direction of Time on Event Horizon

Does the axis of Time point into a black hole or away from? Can you give a reference paper?
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Is an event horizon absolute to all observers?

Recently I had discussion whether the event horizon of a black hole is absolute or relative to different (outside) observers. Does someone just 1m above the horizon (disregarding effects of tidal ...
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Electromagnetic black hole?

So I was thinking about something for the past while Consider a large spherical foam-ball with homogeneous density. Where a foam ball is defined as an object that can absorb matter with 0 friction ...
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229 views

Are gravitons bound by the event horizon?

I understand that photons, even when traveling at the speed of light, cannot escape the event horizon of a black hole. Are gravitons and other virtual particles traveling at the speed of light also ...
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What does “all future lies within the event horizon” mean?

I was trying to find an answer as to why light does not escape black holes and I stumbled upon this Phys.SE question. In the answer it said that: "Since all future lies within the event horizon, ...
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Relativistic Computation?

Is it possible to employ relativity to develop computational technology? Here is a really basic example: Build a Computer and Feed it the Problem (say the problem is projected to take 10 years to ...
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Would dense matter around a black hole event horizon eventually form a secondary black hole? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Black hole formation as seen by a distant observer Given that matter can never cross the event horizon of a black hole (from an external observer point of view), if a ...
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Does cosmic expansion imply the possibility of the universe splitting in half; multiple big-crunches?

There is an event horizon where cosmic expansion leads to superluminal recession speeds for sufficiently distant objects -- the Hubble Volume. 1) Does matter beyond the event horizon affect us ...
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The difference between an apparent horizon and event horizon?

I'm currently writing a project on minimal surfaces and general relativity - however I don't understand the difference between the apparent and event horizon? They ultimately both seemed to be defined ...
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Is the Casimir effect also present between two event horizons?

A follow-up to this question: Is the Casimir effect also present between two event horizons?
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Further explanation of the Penrose Conjecture

I'm currently a third year maths undergrad, writing a dissertation on the application of minimal surfaces in space. I have recently come across the Penrose Conjecture that the mass of a spacetime is: ...
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Trapped Surfaces. Any good articles?

I'm currently writing a dissertation on trapped surfaces as minimal surfaces. I have exhausted all of the resources I have, and the internet is pretty limited (in that it is fairly repetitive on just ...
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How can things at the event horizon slow down and appear to stop to a remote observer?

So they say the remote observer will never see anything fallen to the black hole, because any object will slow down as it gets closer to the event horizon and eventually stop to stay there forever. Am ...
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CPT and Event Horizon

Is the example of neutrino entering the event horizon of BH quoted from this article a valid possible example of CPT violation due to the presence of event horizon in BH ? Please, note that there is ...
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How is black hole affected by gravity of nearby bodies?

I run into wikipedia articles about ergosphere of rotating black holes. What if some massive body passes nearby some black hole: is something like ergosphere produced, or is the event horizon ...
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Black-holes are in which state of matter?

Wikipedia says, A black hole grows by absorbing everything nearby, during its life-cycle. By absorbing other stars, objects, and by merging with other black-holes, they could form supermassive ...
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Is there a way to photograph the very edge of black hole?

According to Professor Stephen Hawking, black holes emit radiation, Hawking radiation. The bigger the black hole, the fainter the radiation. That means, I personally believe, if we built large enough ...
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Why is the Schwarzschild radius the radius of an event horizon?

I've been searching the web and many references without much success. My question is how do we know that, in the Schwarzschild black hole solution, the surface with coordinate $r=2M$ (in the geometric ...
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Dipping a Dyson Ring below the event horizon

The basic assumption about inescapability beyond the Event Horizon is that the necessary escape speed (orbital speed) would exceed speed of light, therefore no object can achieve it. Now, would it be ...
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What happens when Dark Matter comes in contact with the event horizon of a large Black Hole

Josh Hill, 9, Oakdale Elementary has always talked Theory of Relativity and Astrophysics etc., I can answer most but lately he has stumped me and has been begging me to ask a pro, so here it is.... ...
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Why “light cones” have different shapes near black holes?

There is theory that light cone shape does not depend on the reference frame in which it is viewed. So why we draw light cones near black hole differently? I thought that if I am observing (from the ...
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What is the relationship between the Schwarzschild radius and Black hole Singularity?

What is the relationship between the Schwarzschild radius and Black hole Singularity? Can the Planck length be the length of singularity? Or is the length of the Schwartzschild shorter than the ...
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Question about Black Holes

I'm not a physicist so I'm sorry if this question is stupid from your point of view, but I believe it's not. Let us make this thought experiment: Take a black hole and put near it (but at a safety ...
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Do all event horizons emit radiation?

So, the event horizon around a black hole emits radiation, and Rindler space is full of thermal energy. I guess I have two questions- does the Unruh effect have anything to do with radiation from the ...
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A two-dimensional event horizon?

Today, I came across an article which says that the Universe began with the collapse of a 4-dimensional [spatial] Universe. Well, I don't know if there's any way to confirm these like it is with all ...
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Relativity and volume of black hole

Does Einstein's theory of special or general relativity incorporate volume? In a particle accelerator two particles smash together at relativistic speeds and "create" new particles (quarks etc) due ...
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Why are black holes special?

A black hole is where it's mass is great enough that light can't escape at a radius above the surface of the mass? I've been told that strange things happen inside the event horizon such as ...
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Hawking Temperature of the BTZ Black Hole

The metric of the BTZ Black Hole is given by $$ ds^2 = - N^2 dt^2 + N^{-2} dr^2 +r^2(d\phi + N^\phi dt)^2 $$ with $$ N^2 = -M+ \frac{r^2}{l^2} + \frac{J^2}{4 r^2}, \ \ \ \ \ \ N^\phi = ...