An event horizon is a type of boundary such that any information past this boundary is inaccessible to the observer it is defined for. Common examples are the Schwarzschild radius of a black hole (which is defined commonly for all observers outside this radius) and the cosmological even horizon ...

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Does the uncertainty principle affect event horizons? [duplicate]

I was thinking about black holes. For a simple black hole the event horizon is given by a distance of 2 times mass (energy) of the black hole. (2m). But according to quantum mechanics, if you try to ...
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What is the radius of the event horizon?

I know that the Schwarzschild radius is given by $$r~=~\frac{2GM}{c^{2}}.\tag{1}$$ However, If we had the metric $$ds^2~=~−A(r,t)dt^2+\frac{dr^2}{B(r,t)}+r^2(dθ^2+\sin^2{θ}dϕ^2),\tag{2}$$ where ...
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How to derive the Schwarzschild radius? [duplicate]

I know that the Schwarzschild radius is given by $$r=\frac{2GM}{c^{2}}.$$ but I never seen a derivation for this equation. 1- Does anyone know how to derive this equation from general relativity? ...
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How can light enter a black hole if it cannot get out?

I have known for a very long time that light cannot exit a black hole. I can even understand some of the simpler reasonning about it, such as escape velocity, or space geometry inside the black hole. ...
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Closed timelike curves in the region beyond the ring singularity in the maximal Kerr spacetime

The region beyond the ring singularity in the maximal Kerr spacetime is described as having closed timeline curves. Why and/or how is the question. Now if you look a Kruskal-Szkeres Diagram (or a ...
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Hawking Temperature of the BTZ Black Hole

The metric of the BTZ Black Hole is given by $$ ds^2 = - N^2 dt^2 + N^{-2} dr^2 +r^2(d\phi + N^\phi dt)^2 $$ with $$ N^2 = -M+ \frac{r^2}{l^2} + \frac{J^2}{4 r^2}, \ \ \ \ \ \ N^\phi = ...
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Do all paths leading into a black hole lead directly at the exact center of the singularity? Or could they go very near it and curve back?

I only have a very basic understanding of general relativity, so this might sound stupid. But as I see that gravitational objects orbiting each other, even if one of them is massive, as long as their ...
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Taking selfies while falling, would you be able to notice a horizon before hitting a singularity?

I am generally interested in the role of "pings"(0a) between participants (a.k.a. "signal roundtrips"(0b), as familiar for instance from Synge's "five point curvature detector") in the determination ...
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Photons at Event Horizon

The escape velocity at event horizon of a black hole is same as speed of light, So this questions is not about all photons travelling into a black hole, but for those which are tangential to the event ...
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Thought experiment - would you notice if you fell into a black hole?

I've heard many scientists, when giving interviews and the like, state that if one were falling into a black hole massive enough that the tidal forces at the event horizon weren't too extreme, that ...
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What happens when an object passes through the event horizon of a black hole in GR?

I've heard/read many times that in the general relativistic description of a black hole an object would pass through the event horizon unharmed (ignoring tidal forces) while quantum mechanics predicts ...
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Is an event horizon absolute to all observers?

Recently I had discussion whether the event horizon of a black hole is absolute or relative to different (outside) observers. Does someone just 1m above the horizon (disregarding effects of tidal ...
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Two spherically symmetric shells of matter collapsing into a black hole

Suppose I have a thin spherically symmetric shell of matter of (rest) mass $M$ that collapses to form a black hole, and later a second thin spherical shell of mass (rest) $M'$, concentric to the ...
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Colliding black holes to an outside observer

We know that a particle approaching an event horizon will appear to an outside observer to slow down and never cross the horizon. What is observed by an outside observer when a singularity ...
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Is there a way to photograph the very edge of black hole?

According to Professor Stephen Hawking, black holes emit radiation, Hawking radiation. The bigger the black hole, the fainter the radiation. That means, I personally believe, if we built large enough ...
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Is a black hole a 3D hole? And doesn't it pull into the 4th dimension?

Hear me out here please: A body on a line (a 1-D world) causes a warp in the line, i.e. a curve (2-D) A body on a plane (a 2-D world) "sinks", causing a warp in the plane, i.e. a pit (3-D) Then does ...
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Event Horizon of Black Hole

What actually does happen to an object after it crosses the Event Horizon of a BH? Does it- lose the properties of matter and become a new, undiscovered type of matter? does it become negative ...
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Electrodynamic near fields around black holes

For the standard Schwarzschild black hole, the temperature of Hawking radiation is simply related to the Schwarzschild radius as $kT = \hbar c/(4\pi r_S)$, meaning that the typical wavelength of ...
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Who can see the event/apparent horizon and Hawking effect?

As I understand, the Hawking effect is related with the presence both event and apparent horizon, i.e. if some kind of horizon exist, a loss/gain of information (unformally speaking) exists. My ...
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Is there a horizontal event horizon on a spinning black hole?

It seems that most of the information one reads about black holes theorises that they are not spinning. The theories then describe all matter approaching a black hole as being absorbed by it. Wouldn't ...
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Formation of the event horizon seems impossible with singularity inside seems impossible [duplicate]

According to what I was reading, the formation of an event horizon appears if the mass becomes compact enough. Unfortunately, due to time dilation the time for mass to fall into the event horizon ...
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Location of singularity in moving black hole

Say a black hole is travelling at $c/2$, does the shape of the event horizon change? What about the location of the event horizon? If it is travelling at a hypothetical $c$, does the event horizon ...
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Why is the universe 3D if the holographic principle says it's encoded in a its surface?

The way I understand the holographic principle is that everything in a 3D space can be thought of as living on the 2D boundary of that space. If that is the case, why does everything in the universe ...
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If we're holding hands, and you're inside the event horizon of a black hole, do we both fall in?

Imagine some science fiction scenario where two people are floating through space holding hands orbiting a black hole. If one person falls close enough to the black hole that they're within the event ...
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Why is it hard to detect a black hole

I've read in some texts that we can't directly observe a black hole in space because not even light can escape from its gravity. Some of the indirect observational methods mentioned are, gravitational ...
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Can gravitational waves escape from inside of black holes? [duplicate]

I understand that light cannot escape from inside of an event horizon because the spacetime curvature is too warped for photons to escape. On the other hand, gravitational waves are ripples of ...
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Schwarzschild radius after inflation [duplicate]

Update and refinement of previous question. At the beginning (Big Bang) if there was parhaps a singlarity as such GR, Quantum theory breaks down and we do not really know what happens. that's why I ...
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Is the difference between an event horizon and a singularity merely perspective?

I know the question has been asked about how an event horizon is distinguishable from a singularity given that time must come to a stop at the event horizon, but I haven't been fully satisfied by the ...
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Why aren't all black holes the same “size”?

The center of a black hole is a singularity. By definition, a singularity has infinite density. So how can a black hole with a different mass or density be described?
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Topology of a black hole

How many dimensions are theorized for a black hole, in view of the fact that black holes are not observed directly.
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Binary Singularity?

When two black holes collide, if the singularities were very small they would never merge together. they would rotate very fast as something other than a disk. The event horizon would oscillate very ...
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How can a black hole increase mass? [duplicate]

As far as I know, the time dilation at the event horizon of a black hole is infinite, so everything falls asymptotically towards, but never reaching, the horizon for an outside observer. How then can ...
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'Dipping' an object beyond an event horizon [duplicate]

Say I'm hovering just outside an event horizon, what would happen if I held onto a stick and dipped half of it beyond the EH? Would I be pulled in? Would the portion of the stick beyond the EH be cut ...
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Why do black holes have a finite size? [duplicate]

There is one piece of information that makes me wonder why finitely sized black holes are even possible: to an observer from afar, anything that approaches a black hole's event horizon is never ...
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If nothing ever falls into a black hole, why is there a puzzle about information?

From an outside perspective, nothing can ever pass the event horizon. It just scooches asymptotically close to the event horizon. So (from our perspective on earth), when a black hole reduces in ...
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How do we expect distance measurements to compare inside and outside the event horizon of a black hole?

I've read that as one approaches the event horizon of a black hole, time is dilated relative to time measured farther away from the event horizon (clocks tick slower near the event horizon). I've ...
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The arrow of time and the cosmology of a black hole interior

When solving the Einstein field equations in Schwarzschild metric for an observer falling into a black hole the radial coordinate r of the black hole and time t switch roles in the equations when ...
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Is it possible to assign a physical radius to a black hole?

The Schwarzschild metric is given by: $$c^2d\tau^2 = \left(1-\frac{r_s}{r}\right)c^2 dt^2-\left(1-\frac{r_s}{r}\right)^{-1}dr^2 - r^2 \left(d\theta^2 + \sin^2 \theta \, d\varphi^2\right).$$ The ...
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What would happen if a negative mass crossed the event horizon of a black hole?

If negative mass really existed and somehow a very fast traveling negative mass object reached near the black hole's event horizon. What would happen when it crosses the event horizon? According to ...
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How close can an observer approach the black hole in an unpowered flyby without falling into it?

In classical mechanics by choosing the right trajectory you can approach a planet arbitrarily closely, if there is no atmosphere or anything to slow you down, you can approach the surface then fly ...
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Why Hawking radiation emission rate inversely proportional to black hole mass? [duplicate]

The rate of Hawking radiation emission increases as the mass of the black hole decreases, what I don't understand is that if the emission method is related to zero-point energy particles appearing and ...
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Black Holes: How does a three dimensional object collapse into a singularity & Where does the matter go?

A black hole comes into existence as the result of the core collapse of enormous stars, which lose quite some mass in a supernova explosion. However, supermassive black holes are still by any means ...
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What does this depiction of a black hole in the movie Interstellar mean?

I was expecting a whirlpool in 3D and the matter glowing from friction as it nears the center, as I expected a event horizon to be negligible visually. How does this depiction work? How big is the ...
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When do you see the second horizon as you fall into a black hole?

Suppose you are a massive observer falling into a Schwarzschild black hole (geodesically or not, it shouldn't matter). At any point on your personal worldline you can receive light signals from the ...
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Is the event horizon also the boundary region of the mass contained by a black hole?

I was recently playing around with classic Newtonian mechanics and calculated that the Earth would have to be compressed to a spherical region of 8.8 millimeters (Its Schwarzchild radius) to turn its ...
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Does inbound light slow down (for an external observer) as it approaches the event horizon?

As I understand, for an external observer nothing even enters a black hole because it takes infinite time in his frame of reference for something to actually reach the event horizon. I also read that ...
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Is the gravitational acceleration at the event horizon constant?

If the escape velocity at the event horizon of a black hole is equal to the speed of light, does this imply that the gravitational acceleration at the event horizon is also constant? For example, ...
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How can black holes be point-like but have a size?

Presumably all singularities are the same size: a point. What makes one black hole bigger than another? Also, a singularity will only have the same mass (or less) than the collapsed star, so what ...
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When does a singularity start to exist during a black hole formation?

Excuse me if the question is naïve. I am not a physicist. Let's imagine formation of a black hole from a homogeneous collapsing star. At certain moment when enough of matter is inside of a small ...
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Is relativistic event horizon half of Newtonian event horizon?

Is Relativistic event horizon half of Newtonian event horizon? relativistic escape velocity formula (from $m\phi=E-E_0$) is $v_e=\sqrt{2\phi-(\frac{\phi}{c})^2}$ and the Newtonian version of the ...