A important extensive property of all systems in thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and information theory, quantifying their disorder (randomness), i.e., our lack of information about them. It characterizes the degree to which the energy of the system is *not* available to do useful work.

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87 views

Living organisms decrease or increase entropy?

Common wisdom seems to suggest that living organisms have lower entropy that their environment. For example, the Wikipedia article on "Entropy and Life" mentions that Schrödinger thought that this was ...
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1answer
703 views

Calculation of entropy change in irreversible cycles, meaning of $\delta Q/T$ in irreversible processes

Let's take the two cycles in the pictures working with an ideal gas. We perform one, and then perform the other. The cycle is made reversible by making the gas exchange heat with a heat bath having ...
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1answer
45 views

Entropy in ideal fluids [closed]

Can you derive a conservation law for entropy per unit mass? I know that there is a proof for this conservation. My assumptions are: $(\nabla p)/n = D \vec{v} + \vec{v} \cdot \nabla\vec{v}$ (Euler ...
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1answer
79 views

my question is about gibbs energy, entropy and all that [closed]

I learnt that Gibbs energy is a free energy to do work! Tell me, what is this free energy and what is the work done (I mean what kind of work). Please also provide me an example of Gibbs free energy, ...
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0answers
25 views

physical constraints on fluid models based on shannon entropy/information

Is it possible to use the idea of entropy to constrain mathematical objects meant to describe physical fluid motion which is virtually incompressible and virtually without friction. More precisely ...
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9answers
2k views

Entropy increase vs Conservation of information (QM)

Unitarity of quantum mechanics prohibits information destruction. On the other hand, the second law of thermodynamics claims entropy to be increasing. If entropy is to be thought of as a measure of ...
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1answer
38 views

Entropy change in a calorimetry problem

A standard textbook problem has us calculate the change in entropy in a system that undergoes some sort of heat exchange. For example, object $A$ has specific heat $c_a$ and initial temperature $T_A$ ...
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2answers
47 views

microstates and internal energy

Consider a system having an internal energy U. The internal energy U is a macrostate parameter but has many microstates. What is the difference between 2 microstates for a given internal energy U?
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3answers
15k views

Do magnets lose their magnetism?

I recently bought some buckyballs, considered to be the world's best selling desk toy. Essentially, they are little, spherical magnets that can form interesting shapes when a bunch of them are used ...
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2answers
531 views

Casimir effect as an entropic force

When I first learned about the depletion interaction, my initial reaction was that it looks very similar to the Casimir effect. On making this remark to the professor, he replied somewhat mystically: ...
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3answers
204 views

How do we define temperature?

I was watching this video What is Temperature?. It states that when we measure temperature we are measuring $dU\over dS$ at equilibrium. But at equilibrium, how the entropy and the internal energy are ...
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8answers
16k views

Why does maximal entropy imply equilibrium?

From a purely thermodynamical point of view, why does that entropy have to be a maximum at equilibrium? Say there is equilibrium, i.e. no net heat flow, why can the entropy not be sitting at a ...
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0answers
64 views

Can Observation change entropy?

I don't know whether this even makes any sense, but if 'observation' can be considered as 'recieving and reading information', can an act of observation (of a system) change (increase or decrease) its ...
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1answer
110 views

Gibbs entropy, Clausius' entropy and irreversibility

I have a bunch of doubts and confusions on the concept of entropy which have been bothering me for a while now. The most important ones are of a more technical nature, arisen from the reading of this ...
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2answers
115 views

Why is entropy defined as a discrete sum over all microstates in classical case?

I'm reading about statistical definition of entropy, which says $$S=-k_B\sum_ip_i\ln p_i,\tag1$$ where $k_B$ is Boltzmann's constant, and $p_i$ is probability of $i$th state to be occupied. But in ...
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3answers
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What is the meaning of Boltzmann definition of Entropy?

I would like to ask if someone knows the physical meaning of Boltzmann's definition of entropy. of course the formula is pretty straightforward $$S=K_b\ln(Ω)$$ but what in the heck is the natural ...
3
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1answer
130 views

Number theoretic loophole allows alternative definition of entropy?

A bit about the post I apologize for the title. I know it sounds crazy but I could not think of an alternative one which was relevant. I know this is "wild idea" but please read the entire post. ...
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5answers
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Second law of thermodynamics and the arrow of time: why isn't time considered fundamental?

I've come across this explanation that the "arrow of time" is a consequence of the second law of thermodynamics, which says that the entropy of an isolated system is always increasing. The argument is ...
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1answer
140 views

Why is the logarithm of the number of all possible states of a system differentiable?

Temperature of a system is defined as $$\left( \frac{\partial \ln(\Omega)}{ \partial E} \right)_{N, X_i} = \frac{1}{kT}$$ Where $\Omega$ is the number of all accessible states (ways) for the system. $ ...
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0answers
32 views

Have we found a resolution to the Loschmidt paradox? [duplicate]

Loschmidt's Paradox (also known as the Reversibility Paradox) claims that it is not possible to deduce an irreversible process from time-symmetric dynamics such as the classic dynamics. This puts the ...
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2answers
47 views

Can the law of entropy decide our fate? [closed]

Second law of thermodynamics states that entropy always increases.Elixir of immortal life is a thing humans are longing for since ages.Does this law forbid us from becoming immortal?I mean if disorder ...
4
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1answer
232 views

Explicit form of the entropy production in hydrodynamics

I'm trying to understand how hydrodynamics arise from a precise, mathematical formulation of thermodynamics, learning mostly from Landau's "Hydrodynamics". So Landau starts from formulating the ...
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4answers
200 views

What is the cause for the inclusion of 'thermal equilibrium' in the statement of Ergodic hypothesis?

This is the fundamental assumption of statistical mechanics: In an isolated system in thermal equilibrium $^1$, all accessible microstates are equally probable. But why does it mention the ...
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6answers
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Why was the universe in a extraordinarily low-entropy state right after the big bang?

Let me start by saying that I have no scientific background whatsoever. I am very interested in science though and I'm currently enjoying Brian Greene's The Fabric of the Cosmos. I'm at chapter 7 and ...
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2answers
376 views

How can heat turn into light

I am confused about how hot surfaces can radiate light to their surroundings. When I shine a light on a surface the light turns to heat spontaneously, and when I leave that hot surface it radiates ...
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2answers
2k views

What is the conceptual difference between Gibbs and Boltzmann entropies?

In simple words what is the conceptual difference between Gibbs and Boltzmann entropies? Gibbs entropy: $S=-k_B\sum p_i\ln p_i$ Boltzmann entropy: $S=-k_B\ln \Omega$
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1answer
48 views

Why are $S = -k_B\sum_i P_i \ln P_i$ and $S = k_B \ln\Omega$ equivalent?

This might be a silly question, but I don't see the equivalence relation between these two equations. Could somebody explain to me how to derive one from the other? Thanks in advance!
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3answers
109 views

The second law of thermodynamics and life on Earth [closed]

The second law of thermodynamics says that order always decreases in a system. The appeareance of life seems to contradict that law, but if we invoke the Sun, everything faals into place again. But ...
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0answers
39 views

Does it take the same amount of time, it takes for a system to get to a low-entropy (fluctuation) state from equilibrium, to go in the other way?

Let a system be in a state of fluctuation - a state of low-entropy at $t_0\;.$ Then before and after a sufficiently large but finite time-interval, the system would again be at equilibrium. As the ...
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2answers
97 views

Exact differentials and state functions

I was reading a Wiki article on the relationships between heat capacities And during the derivation I came across this formula (and others like it): This equation was used as a tool in a ...
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8answers
4k views

Entropy is…disorder?

As I read somewhere, it said that the universe is heading toward disorder a.k.a entropy increasing. Now as far as I know from the second law of thermodynamics it states that entropy is indeed ...
4
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2answers
125 views

Is black hole formation reversible if physics law holds even in time reverse?

As we know many situations still fulfill physics law if time is reversed, such as particle collision. But how about black hole formation? Suppose a star is turning to a black hole and starts to have ...
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0answers
38 views

Extra 5/2 tau term in chemical potential of a monoatomic ideal gas? [closed]

The chemical potential of an ideal monoatomic gas should be: $\mu = \tau ln \frac {n}{n_Q}$ http://web.mit.edu/ndhillon/www/Teaching/Physics/bookse5.html I get this result if I derive it using the ...
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4answers
231 views

How can there be entropy change in this system?

How can there be an entropy change in this system? Suppose if I have a system consisting of liquid water, $1\, \mathrm{kg}$ at $290\,\mathrm{K}$, I stir it, and do say, $10\, \mathrm{J}$ of work on ...
3
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2answers
141 views

Entropy / Structure Relations

I want to check on the validity of the following objective definition of order. Is it correct? Is there a more rigorous statement of this concept? The further a system is from its maximum ...
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2answers
149 views

Is there really a direction of time?

Laws of physics are (almost) time symmetric, so a time-reversed description of a physical process is as qualified as the original one. What's the reason then, that in reality one version seems to ...
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2answers
68 views

Thermodynamics and Newton's second law

Is it correct to say, that the Newton's laws (or a Newtonian system) is reversible if the friction isn't considered (the fact that the time is of second order $\frac{d^2x}{dt^2}$) and an isolated ...
2
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1answer
51 views

Why must the total change in entropy be 0 for a heat cycle to be as efficient as possible?

If $\Delta S_{total}$ were not zero, then heat flow would take place at different temperatures. It is easy to see why this is true by examining the opposite: that when heat flow takes place at the ...
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0answers
21 views

How would one derive a theoretical anti-entropic force equation? [closed]

How would one imagine and formulate a theoretical force that counteracts the second law of thermodynamics? I'm not conceptualizing a force that merely pauses Entropy, but a force that creates order, ...
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2answers
122 views

Why can't the entropy of an isolated system decrease? [duplicate]

I read that heat cannot flow from cooler body to hotter because for that entropy of the system becomes negative. Why is that so? Why we cannot have negative entropy?
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0answers
115 views

Doesn't this LED created by MIT violate the second law of thermodynamics?

Here is the article I am referring to: http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2012-03/09/230-percent-efficient-leds In their own words (or at least the article writer's), "it appears to draw in heat ...
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0answers
52 views

Could the Big Bang be the result of a decrease in entropy?

In my freshman engineering physics class I learned that a decrease in entropy, though hypothetically possible, is less statistically likely than either any or almost any other possible single ...
3
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1answer
100 views

A mass falls to the ground from a height. What's the change of the entropy of the universe?

A mass $m$ falls to the ground from a height $h$. The temperature $T$ is constant. What's the change of the entropy of the universe? It's an example in Carter's Classical and Statistical ...
0
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1answer
112 views

If time is like space, why entropy always increases with time? [duplicate]

If time is like space, why entropy always increases with time I should not be able to distinguish whether I am going forwards or backwards in time. As entropy always increase with time. I can ...
2
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2answers
950 views

Difficulties with understanding total entropy change and unavailabillty

Of course, I know the fact that the entropy of an isolated system never decreases. Neverthless what makes me confused about the entropy(or change of entropy) of an isolated system is the explanation ...
2
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1answer
145 views

Is entropy related to Poincare recurrence time?

One of the ideas involved in the concept of entropy is that nature tends from order to disorder in isolated systems. But we even know that Poincare recurrence time also is a particular time after ...
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0answers
50 views

Behavior of maximum entropy states in a closed system?

As I understand it, entropy is a measure of the number of permutations of microstates of a system possible, without changing the observed 'macrostate variables' / measurements or properties of a ...
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2answers
2k views

Physics-based derivation of the formula for entropy

I am looking for a derivation of the formula $$S~=~-\Sigma_ip_i \log (p_i).$$ for entropy, from first principles. I only wish to assume the laws of physics, and without involving concepts in ...
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1answer
1k views

Motivation for the use of Tsallis entropy

Every now and again I hear something about Tsallis entropy, $$ S_q(\{p_i\}) = \frac{1}{q-1}\left( 1- \sum_i p_i^q \right), \tag{1} $$ and I decided to finally get around to investigating it. I haven't ...
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0answers
35 views

Is uncertainty principle due to entropy? [duplicate]

Is uncertainty principle due to entropy or thermodynamics at all , I was wondering