Quantum entanglement is the mechanism by which quantum correlations between two sub-systems survive even after being physically separated from an interaction region. The correlations could in principle survive without neither time nor space constraint.

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Weak measurement and Hardy's paradox

How the notion of weak measurement resolves Hardy's paradox?
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Producing energy with entanglement

If we entangle two electrons for example and move one of the electron to Mars for instance. Are we able to somehow transfer the kinetic force of Mars from its movement (spinning and orbitting) to ...
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Does the violation of Bell inequality by a classical field imply “classical entanglement”?

This article has been brought to my attention recently (free access) : Shifting the quantum-classical boundary: theory and experiment for statistically classical optical fields In the abstract, they ...
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How does measurement affect multi-particle entangled particles?

It is my understanding that you can have two entangled particles, A and B, and measure their spins from two different angles, X and Y, such that: If you measure A using one angle (e.g. X), there's ...
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Proof that entanglement is independent of distance

I've already read this quite often but never seen a proof—maybe it's just so clear to physicists, but I'm not really sure how to prove it. Currently I'm pretty confused so the following might be ...
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Quantum entanglement and the big bang

Prior to the Big Bang all matter was compressed into a point of high density. Why isn't all matter already entangled?
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Why can't we use entanglement to defy Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle?

In principle, it is possible to entangle any property of two particles, including speed and momentum. Surely then, this could be used to defy the Uncertainty Principle, which states that the momentum ...
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Entanglement, Bohr-Einstein Debate, Bell's Inequality

On BBC episode The Secrets of Quantum Physics (Part 1) Jim Al-Khalili explains quantum mechanics for the layman. In the first half, he does a very good job; in the second half, either he thought his ...
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Is communication of the wavefunction via quantum entanglement possible?

Assume two particles are entangled and separated by an arbitrary distance. Particle 1 is in a potential well of width w1. If I'm not mistaken, the wavefunction of Particle 2 correlates to the ...
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Taking photos without photons? [closed]

I was looking up some science news and I came across this! Blind quantum camera snaps photos of Schrödinger’s cat ...
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Simultaneous measurement for quantum entanglement

In the simple example that we measure the spin of two entangled particles, we measure one to have spin up so we know the other has spin down. If we could (theoretically) measure both particles at the ...
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Theoretically, is there a way to hold a quantum entangled particle in a state by continuously observing it?

When the spin of a quantum entangled particle is measured, is it only possible to do an instantaneous measurement, or can a particles spin be held in a collapsed state by constantly observing it? In ...
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Does continuous observation of an entangled particle keep it locked in its current state?

If two particles are entangled, and one of the particles ParticleA is periodically polled or pulsed of for it's state, and the other particle ParticleB is polled for a duration in seconds, will the ...
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Why does measuring the spin of an entangled particle cause it to become unentangle?

I've been taught that measuring the spin of an entangled particle causes it to become unentangled, but not how or why, so I'd like to know by what process this occurs. Is the cause known? If so, ...
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Quantum Eraser thought experiment with light photons of distinct color

I tried to recreate the Quantum Eraser experiment into a thought experiment with a few changes. It left me a little perplexed as to what outcomes I should expect. Any help would be appreciated. Lets ...
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Which particles can or cannot be entangled?

Is Quantum entanglement limited to fundamental particles? If it is, then which particles can or cannot be entangled?
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Local EPR-experiments with photons in vacuum?

The principle of non-locality states "that an object is influenced directly only by its immediate surroundings." (Wikipedia) When two entangled particles are measured in an EPR experiment, we ...
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Entanglement between the electrons in the Laughlin wave function

Consider the $1/3$-Laughlin wave function $$ \Psi \propto \exp \left(-\sum_i |z_i|^2 \right) \prod_{1\leq i<j\leq N} (z_i-z_j)^3 . $$ It cannot be written in the form of a Slater determinant, ...
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Connection between bond-dimension of a matrix product state and entanglement

The bond dimension is the dimension of the truncated matrix product state (MPS). Let us assume that I am simulating some many-body system with high entanglement via the density matrix renormalization ...
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Is quantum entanglement functionally equivalent to a measurement?

I saw the following talk the other day: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dEaecUuEqfc&feature=share In it, Dr. Ron Garret posits that entanglement isn't really that "special" of a property. He ...
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Why is it necessary for all the component-states to have same phase for interference?

I am currently reading Decoherence. In this site, it is written : Now here is the absolutely key point: every component eigenstate has an associated phase . It is this phase$^1$ which gives the ...
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spooky nonlocal communication, or bad abstract?

I'm referring to this recent paper, "Experimental Proof of Nonlocal Wavefunction Collapse for a Single Particle Using Homodyne Measurements" by Fuwa et al. published in Nature Communications. ...
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Impulse travelling faster than light

There have been conducted many experiments in which light impulses traveled faster than light like the one in Princeton in 2000. This phenomenon has something to do with quantum entanglement. Does ...
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Entanglement and Special Relativity [closed]

There are 2 particles entangled and move far apart to 2 measuring devices . The first measurement of either particle will collapse the wave function and set spin up and spin down on the particles. 2 ...
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Holographic dual of a massive QFT?

A naive question about holographic dual of a massive QFT: The Ryu-Takanayagi formula for the entanglement entropy (see their paper) seem to suggest that the holographic dual of a massive QFT (e.g. a ...
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Does a normal torch emit entangled photons?

I was reading a sciencenews.org post about three photons being entangled. My question here is, why is the chance of producing an entangled pair once in a billion times? Isn't every particle produced ...
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Why does a violation of locality not imply a violation of relativity?

This question is closely related to: What counts as information? Taking the specific example, again, of the EPR experiment. I think everyone agrees on the following: The act of measuring the ...
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Entangled Photon (laser pointer)

From a laser pointer emission; is it creating entangled pairs of photon? is it possible to get more than "pair" entangled, like group of photons all entangled?
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Information and entaglement via determination of the first's system state with interaction

Could we have entangled systems (microscopical or macroscopical) and construct a way of altering the state of one of the two entangled parts (let's say by Alice) via interaction and thus making the ...
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Local explanation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in terms of force fields

Here is an interesting paper for the Physics SE community: On the role of potentials in the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Lev Vaidman. Phys. Rev. A 86 no. 4, 040101 (R) (2012). arXiv:1110.6169 ...
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can we transfer data via quantum entanglement (likewise we communicate today) to a specific target

Today we rely on electromagnetic field for communication. I'm a entrepreneur, I want to know why we can't transfer data with this technology to transfer data from one place to another place. It can ...
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Measuring quantum entanglement in paper by Ma et al [duplicate]

Looking at the links below, could somebody please explain how entanglement between Alice and Bob particles is established/deduced from Victor's choice/measurement? I understand that Alice and Bob can ...
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Information scrambling and Hawking non-thermal radiation states

Could a very small black hole where half of its entropy has been radiated, emit Hawking radiation that is macroscopically distinct from being thermal? i.e: not a black body radiator. Or would the ...
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Delayed choice entanglement swapping: why are Alice & Bob's measurements useless without Victor's?

Here is the article by Ma et al.:http://arxiv.org/abs/1203.4834 I have read many explanations on this site and others that emphasize that Victor's data is needed to make Alice and Bob's usable... ...
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Separability in quantum physics

I am under the impression that violations of Bell's inequality as shown in e.g. the Aspect experiment can be explained by the fact that the particles where not separable rather then the non-existence ...
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Quantum Teleportation between Entangled Qubits

My question refers to the experiment described in this article: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/345/6196/532.abstract Here's a popular science description: ...
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What counts as information?

What counts as information? In e.g. the EPR experiment why is one entangled particle knowing instantaneously the state of the other not counted as 'information'. Edit Following a discussion in the ...
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Does quantum theory obey locality?

Bell's inequality together with the Aspect experiment shows that that we cannot have local realism. But does quantum theory obey locality? and if not how can locality be violated but not special ...
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The expectation value of entanglement entropy of composite system in a random pure state

I'm trying to compute the expectation value of entanglement entropy of composite system in a random pure state, but I'm running into some problems. The system we are considering is composed of two ...
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Is entanglement a classical phenomenon (last attempt)?

This is a reformulation of two previous questions that seem to have been misunderstood, or most likely, I failed to make them clear. I thank all people that answered, even the belligerent ones. Some ...
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Is there any quantum experiments or effects that you can do at home? [duplicate]

I have heard that you can do the double slit experiment, but is there any other experiments like particle entanglement or observer-induced state collapse?
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Operational difference between separable, entangled, PPT and NPT states

Given two parties Alice and Bob, a state $\rho_{AB}$ is said to be separable if it can be written as $\rho_{AB}=\sum_i p_i\rho^i_A\otimes\rho^i_B$, with $p_i$ being probabilities and ...
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Geometric measure of entanglement in example with GHZ state

I'm learning about different possibilities to measure entanglement right now, and I'm struggling with the geometric measure. My question is probably quite trivial, but I can just not comprehend how ...
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Is entanglement a consequence of the uncertainty principle?

I am an aspiring physicist and once, I asked my professor on what triggers quantum entanglement and he graciously remarked "The great uncertainty principle!" - I was slightly confused and didn't say ...
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Quantum entanglement and spooky action at a distance

When quantum entanglement is explained in "layman's terms", it seems (to me) that the first premise, that we have to accept on faith, is that a particle doesn't have a certain property (the particle ...
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Link between Hawking-Bekenstein Black hole entropy and entanglement entropy

I'm currently doing a project on two sided Ads-Schwarzschild black holes in the context of Ads/CFT. I want to show that the entanglement entropy between the two CFTs corresponds approximately to the ...
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Can quantum entanglement be simulated on a digital computer to any degree of precision?

First principles modelling of physical phenomena has been very successful in physics. The largest limitation is perhaps the fact that many QM problems are NP hard so we would need really powerful ...
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Are Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons entangled?

Suppose we'd like to know whether two cosmic microwave background photons emitted from different parts of the sky have any quantum correlation with each other. We could measure polarization of two ...
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Why is quantum entanglement considered to be an active link between particles?

From everything I've read about quantum mechanics and quantum entanglement phenomena, it's not obvious to me why quantum entanglement is considered to be an active link. That is, it's stated every ...
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Quantum Entanglement - an illusion based on a wrong assumption?

Almost all resources I've read about Quantum Entanglement speak about how 'amazing' it is that two entangled particles are bound over any distance, and that the state of one particle determines the ...