Energy is a quantity which gives an overview of the amount of work doable by the system.

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does electron - positron pair annihilation occur when E is negative?

Suppose I release an electron-positron pair from rest at a distance of $r$. Then the particles attract each other and collide. The total energy $E$ is $$E = 2m_ec^2-\frac{e^2}{4\pi\varepsilon_0r},$$ ...
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55 views

Big jump or small jumps?

To travel a certain distance s, is it more energy efficient to use one massive jump, or several small jumps? (First approach deleted, didn't make sense) This approach is probably a lot better. ...
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139 views

QFT and violation of Heisenberg uncertainty principle

In some QFT books is said that a free electron can emit a virtual photon as long as it reabsorbs the photon and returns to its original state within a time: $$\Delta t<\dfrac{\hbar}{2\Delta E}$$ ...
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136 views

How to calculate the amout of time for oil to get out from a pneumatic cylinder?

I have a system. You can assume it is just a 1" diameter steel pneumatic cylinder (1 foot long). Assume we ignore the bore size issue at this point. One chamber is filled up by oil (6" of volume), ...
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540 views

Potential energy in Special Relativity

In Special Relativity, the energy of a free particle is $E^2=p^2c^2+m^2c^4$. But what would be the energy when there is potential energy? If it's something like $E=\sqrt{p^2c^2+m^2c^4}+U$, what ...
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182 views

Is energy content of a system different dependending on the observer?

For the sake of simplicity, let's imagine that the entire Universe is empty except for a single lump of (classical) matter with mass $m$. In its center of momentum frame, it is clear that the total ...
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Black holes and positive/negative-energy particles

I was reading Brian Greene's "Hidden Reality" and came to the part about Hawking Radiation. Quantum jitters that occur near the event horizon of a black hole, which create both positive-energy ...
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Work and energy problems [on hold]

Calculate the energy posses sedby a stone of mass 10kg kept at a height of 5m. If 196x102 J of energy were used to raise a 40kg boy above the ground, how high would he be raised? (50m) Calculate ...
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Velocity and energy of falling object [on hold]

A hammer of mass 1 kg falls freely from a height of 2 m. Calculate the velocity and the kinetic energy of the hammer just before it touches the ground. Does the velocity of the hammer depend on the ...
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5k views

Force as gradient of scalar potential energy

My text book reads If a particle is acted upon by the forces which are conservative; that is, if the forces are derivable from a scalar potential energy function in manner $ F=-\nabla V $. I ...
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59 views

Work performed by a stationary object in a gravitational field “on Earth”

I was thinking about this problem: How much work is required to hold an object stationary in a gravitational field? or: How much energy is required to keep an object stationary in a ...
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Catapult vs. Trebuchet

I have been looking at trebuchet designs lately, and I have noticed that most, if not all, have a sling attached to them. Without such a sling, the machine would be a catapult. In terms of the speed ...
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94 views

What happens to gas molecules after ionization?

I know that gas molecules conduct electricity after they get ionized but what will happen if we keep increasing the voltage even after ionization? Will it explode? If it will then how much energy ...
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68 views

Conservation of kinetic energy in collision

Why is kinetic energy conserved in collision between glass balls while it is not conserved in collision between a ball and floor?
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543 views

How do I express the interaction energy between two charged spheres?

Consider two identical insulating spheres each with radius $R$ and uniform charge $Q$ through their volume. They are separated from their centers by a distance of $d>2R$. Here is my general ...
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1answer
548 views

Relation between linear momentum and translational kinetic energy

The momentum $m v$ of a particle is formally the same as the derivative its translational kinetic energy $\frac{1}{2} m v^2$ with respect to $v$. Similarly the angular momentum $I \omega$ is the ...
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What does the relation between mass and energy of a free particle mean?

What does the Hamiltonian for a free particle mean? Does it mean that the kinetic energy of the particle is in reverse relation with mass? $H$ or $E=\hbar^{2}k^{2}/2m$. Or better to ask: what's the ...
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5answers
840 views

Why does heat lose its energy as we get further away?

Why does heat lose its energy dramatically as I move back? Say I have a fire around 0.5 meters in front of me, I can clearly feel the heat, however, as I move even very slightly back, say 1 meter ...
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105 views

Energy Stored in a Capacitor with and without Dielectric

I have seen the equation $V = \frac {V_0}{K}$, but also the equation $V=\frac{1}{2}CV^2$. The values of C and V increase in the same linear ration with K (because $C=KC_0$). However, as the energy ...
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117 views

Perspective and changes in kinetic energy

Say you have two planes flying next to each other at the same speed and one decides to pick up speed by burning a tank of rocket fuel. If someone on the ground wanted to know that plane's new speed ...
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393 views

Why is kinetic energy only “often $(1/2)mv^2$”?

I am reading the first few pages of Nakahara and refreshing my memory on physics I learned a while ago as a physics math undergrad. Nakahara defines a field $F$ to be conservative if it's the gradient ...
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89 views

what property of steam makes it the preferable motive fluid in jet ejectors? why not air or nitrogen?

I want to know what properties of steam make it the fluid of choice in steam turbines jet ejectors. I want to understand the mechanism of energy conversion in these equipment and hence understand ...
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46 views

Intuitive physical concept for squared velocity in the context of energy

Kinetic energy $E_{kin} = \frac{1}{ 2} m v^2 $ may be expressed in $kg \frac{ m^2 }{sec^2}$.The formula includes squared velocity. However, instead of squared velocity = v • v it seems to be easier ...
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64 views

Is nature quantized?

I was reading Planck's postulate the other day on Wikipedia and couldn't help but noticing the sentence: "...is the postulate that the energy of oscillators in a black body is quantized..." ...
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Dependence of kinetic friction on relative velocity

While I was reading my book I came across a line that tells that there is slight dependence of kinetic friction on velocity of relative motion of the bodies. Can anyone tell me how is this so?
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Is the total energy of the universe constant?

If total energy is conserved just transformed and never newly created, is there a sum of all energies that is constant? Why is it probably not that easy?
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Is time travel impossible because it implies total energy in the universe is non-constant over time?

I have always argued with my friends regarding Time Travel that it is impossible. My argument has been that it will destroy the theory that all the energy in the universe is constant since when one ...
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709 views

Where do planets get energy to revolve around sun? [duplicate]

We know that every planet in our solar system revolve's around the sun in a particular orbit. But were to they get the energy to revolve around the sun. And why do they not drop into the sun there is ...
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4answers
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Why is potential energy negative when orbiting in a gravitational field?

I had to do a problem, and part of it was to find the mechanical energy of satellite orbiting around mars, and I had all of the information I needed. I thought the total mechanical energy would be the ...
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217 views

Question about conservation of energy and force

Feynman mentions in his book, The Feynman Lectures on physics Let us now illustrate the energy principle with a more complicated problem, the screw jack shown in Fig. 4-5. A handle 20 inches ...
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107 views

Energy required to start and then stop rotating an object, when we have gravity

Imagine an arbitrary object with center of mass at the red dot in the picture, rotational inertia from the point of the hanging: I, hanging from a fixed point, what is the energy required to start ...
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10answers
412 views

How far can light go?

When a ray of light is projected, (say) from the surface of Earth to outside in space. The condition is that, there is no obstruction to it till infinity (it travels only in vaccum). My question is ...
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Do virtual photons have a frequency?

Real photons do have frequencies, which is directly related to its energy. So, can virtual photons that take part in EM interactions have frequencies too? When my hand is pressed up against a glass ...
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54 views

Highest background gamma ray energy?

What is the highest naturally occurring gamma ray energy that you would see in background? And what is it is source?
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Domain of different types of collision?

Can anyone tell me why elastic collision occur between atomic particles? inelastic collision occur between ordinary objects? perfectly inelastic collision occur during shooting? ...
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99 views

Calculate the rise in temperature from directed radiation [closed]

For example I have a 1 watt laser and direct it to a sheet of metal (copper), if I were to direct it for say a time interval of 1 minute what would be the change in temperature? I can predict that it ...
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2answers
151 views

When do we see particles to be in a superposition of energy states?

I have two doubts: Exactly when does this happen? and If we are in a superposition of states (lets say E1 and E2) and the particle absorbs a photon, what will happen? If E3-E1 = hf, will it go to E3? ...
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Marvin the Martian vs. the Death Star: how much energy will they actually need to disintegrate the Earth? [duplicate]

Marvin the Martian vs. the Death Star: how much energy will they actually need to disintegrate the Earth? According to a detailed analysis by Dave Typinski, Marvin the Martian’s Illudium Q-36 ...
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Marvin the Martian vs. the Death Star: how much energy will they actually need to disintegrate the Earth?

According to a detailed analysis by Dave Typinski, Marvin the Martian’s Illudium Q-36 Explosive Space Modulator will require $1.711 \cdot 10^{32}~\text{J}$ to shatter the Earth into a gravitationally ...
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2answers
25 views

Factors on which Coefficient of restitution depend

What are the factors on which coefficient of restitution depend? What is the reason for more coefficient of restitution of two glass balls (0.95) than for two lead balls (0.20)?
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29 views

Energy efficiency for common fuels

If we take matter-antimatter annihilation as being 100% energy efficient, what would be the energy efficiency of: Uranium fission, Fusion of Hydrogen to Helium, and Combustion of Kerosene. I ...
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Why does a conservative force return the work done against it by a body to that body?

Newton's 3rd law of motion: Newton's third law of motion or the law of action and reaction implies that there is no isolated force in nature. Whenever there is any force at all , there must be ...
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1answer
29 views

Relationship between momentum and energy for rocket-powered aircraft

I'm trying to write a problem for my students in an algebra-based physics class. We have a flight simulator and I've got a glider in the simulator that has a couple rocket boosters attached. Students ...
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1answer
81 views

Thermodynamic Internal Energy Reference States

The internal energy, $U$, of a given thermodynamic state, $\boldsymbol{R}$, as introduced in thermodynamics textbooks like Callen seems to be defined as: $U (\boldsymbol{R}) = \Delta U ...
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2answers
136 views

Solar spectrum units

Why is intensity $I$ on a graph of the solar spectrum always showed in units of $[\mathrm{W/m^2/nm}]$ instead of simply $[\mathrm{W/m^2}]$? (The y-axis on the graph.) It is apparently shown as ...
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2answers
53 views

Can antimatter-matter collisions generate heat?

We have a project at school to develop an idea about how we can generate electricity. My question is: do collisions between matter and antimatter particles generate heat, so that one could harvest it ...
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2answers
74 views

Understanding relationship between work and energy

I've read over 10 books about work and energy, and I just simply can't understand it. First of all, they go ahead and randomly define that work is force times distance: $$W=F X \cos\theta$$ Okay, ...
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69 views

Is energy affected by forces?

Curious, is any certain form of energy, such as heat, affected by a force? Can you push energy from one place to another?
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90 views

Is the kinetic energy of an electron always $1.6 \cdot 10^{-19}~\text{J}$?

I was doing the following problem. For $d$. They bizarrely added an extra step. They calculated the momentum of the electron to find the De Broglie wavelength using the kinetic energy relationship. ...
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Do I need to convert units to be compatible with constants?

I want to calculate the wavelength of radiation given its energy. I know I need to use $E=h f$ and $f = c / \lambda$. All I'm given is $E = 20 \text{ keV}$, now my true question is: Do I use $E = ...