Energy is the conserved quantity associated to time-translation invariance and represents the work a system is capable of doing. Use this tag for questions about energy, and consider adding [tag:energy-conservation] if it is specifically about its conservation.

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Is empty space made of energy?

GR says that matter bends space around it, QM says even empty space must contain something. Is empty space a form of energy?
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232 views

Water bottle rocket: Where does the energy go without water?

In Portland's OMSI there is a hands-on water bottle rocket station. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdtmVY76_PQ). The rockets are normal PET bottlers. The visitors fill their bottle with an amount of ...
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Does Light have Weight?

If I light a torch and hold it against a wall, will the wall feel any force? If yes, what factors does the magnitude of such a force depend upon? (Area of the wall covered by the beam, intensity of ...
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Which travels further, a football or a soccer ball, when thrown?

I recently answered this question: Laminar Versus Turbulent Flow and it caused me to think of the following situation. Given that an (American) football weighs between Football 400 to 430 grams, and ...
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28 views

How to calculate the thermoelastic energy loss when applying displacing force

I'm trying to calculate the motion of an arrow (or similar shape) in orbit. My understanding has taken me to the following assumptions: There will be drag on the arrow (the drag in low earth orbit ...
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What does negative energy imply?

I know energy comes in a number of forms and every form of energy is defined uniquely. But if I had to give a broad definition of energy, I would define it as "ability of a system to perform work." ...
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Electricity from vacuum [closed]

Can I generate electricity in complete vacuum without using any conventional sources? Using Casimir theory, according to him, he kept two plates nanometers apart in a vacuum. According to the law of ...
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Where is the flaw in this machine that decreases the entropy of a closed system?

I was thinking about a completely unrelated problem (Quantum Field Theory Peskin & Schroeder kind of unrelated!) when the diagram below sprang into my mind for no apparent reason. After some ...
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Do individual rays of light lose energy via the inverse square law?

We've all heard of the inverse square law, but apparently that refers to the flux or intensity or number of photons hitting an imaginary surface area. This is not exactly what I want to ask about. ...
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how can $\frac{kqq_o}{r}$ be $U$ for both a particle and a system of two particles?

If there is a charge $q$, at a distance $r$ from it there is a voltage and the potential energy of a test charge $q_o$ would be $\frac{kqq_o}{r}$. Now if I construct a system of two charges a ...
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76 views

Where Does the Energy Come From in this Example?

I can't figure out where the energy comes from for the work in a video I found about how the pyramids could have been made. (I do not have enough rep to post the link of it as well as the picture but ...
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Explanation for the spectrum of the sun?

My Question is, why exactely does the intensity vanish below 240 nm ? If i look at the plank's law, obviously the intensity for $\lambda \rightarrow 0$ and $\lambda \rightarrow \infty$ will vanish, ...
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Work done by tension when a particle is tied to a vertical cylinder using a thread and given a velocity perpendicular to the thread

For a particle attached to a rope moving along a circle that has the length of rope as radius, the tension provides centripetal force and work done by tension is zero since velocity of particle is ...
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Is there an example of a situation where you need a continuous spectrum?

If you had a hydrogen atom you could say that you want to be able to ionize them. But if you then add the potential due to the earth, e.g. ...
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3answers
121 views

What was the motivation behind the work formula?

Surely there must be a reason we decided to use this as a metric for mechanical energy.How was it developed and what made it more acceptable than other work formula candidates (Like force over time, ...
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78 views

Why does electrostatic energy not obey superposition principle? What does the extra energy term account for?

Energy stored in an electrostatic field is given by $\frac{\epsilon_0}{2}\int\text{E}^2\text{d}\tau$ where the integration is over all space.If $\vec{\text{E}_0}=\vec{\text{E}_1}+\vec{\text{E}_2}$ and ...
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Question related to charged concentric conducting shells

There is a charged conducting spherical shell given a certain positive charge.Another larger spherical shell is given the same negative charge.The first shell is now placed inside the second shell so ...
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73 views

Entropy reversal in magnets

Entropy is an irreversible phenomenon without any energy supplied to reverse it. I was reading about paramagnetic substances and how dipoles align inside them on application of magnetic field. My ...
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Why does the sun make me feel warm?

For a while I thought that the reason I felt warmth from the sun was because my skin was being hit by photons, but then I realized that photons also hit me when I take an X-ray, but I don't feel any ...
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Open systems (Conservation of Energy): is a temperature change possible if a tube is thermally isolated?

Full question: consider an perfectly thermally isolated cylinder. Water is flowing through this cylinder from the entry to the exit. Is it possible for the water flowing through the exit to have a ...
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Given the Newton constant $G$, the speed of light $c$ and the Planck constant $h$, construct an energy of the system [closed]

How do I use dimensional analysis to construct an energy for the system given the Newton constant $G$, the speed of light $c$ and the Planck constant $h$? I don't know of any energy formulas ...
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Work done by flow of a fluid

I'm looking at the power a flow of steam in a turbine. I originally assumed that the kinetic energy of a moving section of steam was equal to (let $V$ be volume, $\rho$ be density, and $v$ be velocity ...
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Pouring oil on choppy water to calm it , does it work and if so how?

Near where I live, local fishermen often bring cans of castor oil with them, to calm the water around their boats, if they feel bad weather is due. They claim this method of sea calming works, ...
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Battery charging a Capacitor

Ok I know there is a similar question already on here, but mine takes it just a step further. What I would really love to know is exactly how much energy is being transferred from a battery into a ...
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Is there an intuitive explanation of the work formula?

Upon learning calculus, I decided it was time to derive all of classical mechanics to give myself a good understanding of physics. What I found was that, while trying to do so, I would need some ...
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Matter to energy conversion

Okay so I have a question, during a nuclear explosion or particle/antiparticle annihilation, matter is converted into energy. How do I determine if a from a explosion will come lets say a small ...
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Peskin eqn 7.2 contradiction

They state $$\langle\Omega|\phi(x)|\lambda_{\bf p}\rangle=\langle\Omega|e^{iP\cdot x}\phi(0)e^{-iP\cdot x}|\lambda_{\bf p}\rangle \tag{7.4}$$ where $|\lambda_{\bf p}\rangle$ is a state of momentum ...
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Kinetic and potntial energy of an airplane

If an airplane is flying horizontally at an altitude of H, and with a constant velcotiy of V(no air resistance) horizontally. Is there a relationship between the potential energy of the airplane due ...
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Why is there no $1S_{-1/2} $ state of the hydrogen atom?

Heyho, i found this term scheme for the hydrogen atom: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/94/Wasserstoff_Aufspaltung.svg I was wondering why there is only a $1S_\frac{1}{2}$ state and ...
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71 views

Why do systems with a fixed gear-ratio still use gears?

From my understanding, there are two uses of a gearing system: to change the speed of output rotation (trading it with torque), and to change the axis of rotation. Now, in a car, for example, it is ...
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Power of a wave in a string

My text of physics, Gettys', shows how the energy, both kinetic and potential, of a small element $\Delta x$ of a string, through which a wave (whose wave function is $y:\mathbb{R}^2\to\mathbb{R}$, ...
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Could it be that all energy is seeking ground? [closed]

Edited version. If an electrical charge like a lightning bolt seeks ground (think of a lightning's rod's purpose), and if all matter is seeking ground (gravitational pull), and if all energy and all ...
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Kinetic energy of a falling object in water

I am considering the impact energy of an object falling vertically downward with impact velocity $v$ in water. The mass of the object is $m$, and the hydrodynamic added mass from the displaced water ...
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How can Kinetic energy formula and the Work formula be derived without assuming the other to be true?

After searching how to derive the formula for Kinetic energy, I found that most derivations required the use of the "work" formula. After searching how to derive the work formula for a bit, I found ...
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What's the difference between vacuum particle-antiparticle annhiliation and regular annihilation?

Why does vacuum particle-antiparticle creation and annihilation result in nothing rather than photons? What is the difference between that and regular annihilation that does result in photons.
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Kinetic energy as $\pi k_B T$

In the derivation of the Thermal De Broglie Wavelength on Wikipedia, I come across the following: "In the nonrelativistic case the effective kinetic energy of free particles is $E_K=\pi k_B T$ ...
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How to calculate the work of the electrostatic forces in a parallel-plate capacitor?

The expression of the energy stored in a parallel-plate capacitor is: $$U = \frac{e_0\cdot A \cdot V^2}{2d}$$ with $e_0$ the vacuum permittivity, $A$ the surface of the capacitor, $V$ the applied ...
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175 views

Is it possible to measure temperature using sound?

Is it possible to measure the temperature of something using sound, by blasting sound waves at solid objects, liquids and gasses, then measuring how much sound is reflected or absorbed, to give an ...
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If there is no definite speed in the universe, only relative speeds, how does energy increase when velocity approaches the speed of light?

Is the concept of energy increasing as it approaches the speed of light based on the fact that this is only true relative to the observer? Lets say, there's a scenario where a person in a rocket ...
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Why is gravity sensitive to absolute energies?

In QFT absolute energies play no role in the physical set-up, only relative energies (i.e. energy differences) are important. However, in general relativity this doesn't appear to be the case, I've ...
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1answer
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4 momentum in particle physics, collision of positron and electron

If I have a positron striking an electron at rest to create 2 pions( + and -) and I want to calculate the minimum kinnetic energy that the electrons can possess to create these pions, then the created ...
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1answer
119 views

Differentiating between standing waves (stationary waves) and progressive waves [closed]

The question is ''Differentiate between standing waves (stationary waves) and progressive waves?" I do not understand what exactly they would like to hear. Should we talk about the frequency, ...
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Along with electrons, do molecules also directly take in photon energy from a source?

Let's take a black object for example. When waves of light (whether from the sun or a lamp) come into contact with the object, is it just the electrons (not the molecules) of the object that directly ...
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1answer
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How to compute this change of Gibbs energy for a Van der Waals gas?

The change of Gibbs energy at constant temperature and species numbers, $\Delta G$, is given by an integral $\int_{p_1}^{p_2}V\,{\mathrm d}p$. For the ideal gas law $$p\,V=n\,RT,$$ this comes down to ...
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3answers
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What's faulty in my reasoning about energy and momentum in this problem?

The question (from Sparknotes SAT Physics): An athlete of mass 70.0 kg applies a force of 500 N to a 30.0 kg luge, which is initially at rest, over a period of 5.00 s before jumping onto the ...
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What is the relationship between the velocity of an object and its Sound Intensity Level in an inelastic collision?

Assuming the mass, acceleration, and height of the dropped object are constant and the area of the measured sound wave is constant, would the relation be linear, exponential, logarithmic, square root ...
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Does energy exist? [closed]

None of this is going to be rigorous or have a right answer, so please don't take it as though I'm demanding one. I'm just interested in everyone's thoughts. It feels to me (and possibly you) that ...
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189 views

Work - constant or zero speed

Say I'm riding a bicycle at speed $v$. There's air that causes drag force, let's suppose it's constant, equal $F$, and it doesn't change with speed (we know it does increase quadratically with speed, ...
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How can I interpret $P(t) = \frac{1}{Q(t)} \frac{dW(t)}{dt}$ physically?

Generally speaking, one can calculate the work, $W$ (energy) required to compress a volume, $V$ of gas by integrating the pressure-volume 'loop' in a phase-space as $$W=\oint PdV$$ where $P$ is the ...
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Internal energy of an ideal gas as a function of volume

Okay so I've been reading a bit on Thermodynamics and I found something that I couldn't wrap around my head. For an ideal gas, the change in internal energy is equal to $$\Delta U = Q + W$$ And ...