Energy is the conserved quantity associated to time-translation invariance and represents the work a system is capable of doing. Use this tag for questions about energy, and consider adding [tag:energy-conservation] if it is specifically about its conservation.

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What “I” should use in Rotational Energy formula $(I \omega^2)/2$

$\text{Rotational Energy} = \frac{1}{2} I \omega^2$. What $I$ should be used? $I$ as a inertia tensor matrix = stepRotation * inverse moment of inertia * inverse stepRotation; Or I as moment of ...
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151 views

2 streams going into an engine and 2 come out. Find the enthalpy?

Problem: Steam supply to an engine is made of two streams that mix before entering the engine. Stream 1 flows at a $.01\frac{kg}{s}$ with an enthalpy of $2952\frac{kJ}{kg}$ and a velocity of ...
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0answers
626 views

How do I determine the Internal Energy of ammonia at a pressure in temperature when the steam table doesn't say it

I just bought a steam table for my thermodynamics class since they don't allow use to use the one from the book for the tests. This one is different from the one in my textbook as it doesn't give the ...
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2answers
120 views

Is stopping something work?

If somebody pushes against a mass moving with $3 \frac{m}{s}$ to slow it down to $2 \frac{m}{s}$, he will drain the moving system of kinetic energy. Does he do work then or does he consume work? My ...
4
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1answer
563 views

Is there something like the Poynting vector for hydraulic circuits?

The Poynting vector is a representation of the energy flux in electromagnetics, showing the amount and direction of power flow at different points in space. In electric circuits, the energy is not ...
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3answers
823 views

Energy non-conservation for time-dependent potentials

Written in a book I read that the "total energy is not preserved when the potential depends explicitly on time", i.e. $U=U(x,t)$. Is there any proof or explanation for this?
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3answers
422 views

Is there a measure of internal energy flow?

A system might have internal energy and/or kinetic energy. Kinetic energy in classical mechanics is a form of energy the object has, only because of its relative movement to other objects. If you ...
2
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0answers
660 views

Bungee jump physics

Question: A bungee jumper jumps from a bridge. The length of the loose rope is 30 m. When the jumper reach the lowest point possible, the rope stretches 10 m. What is the final stretch of the rope, ...
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4answers
1k views

Energy is actually the momentum in the direction of time?

By comparatively examining the operators a student concludes that `Energy is actually the momentum in the direction of time.' Is this student right? Could he be wrong?
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1answer
103 views

Mathematical Modelling for Efficiency of PV thermal technology

As the efficiency of PV thermal or wind energy decreases with time(from the installment). Is there any mathematical model that gives its relation with time. i.e., whether it is a linear decrease or ...
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3answers
17k views

When does 'energy' turn to matter?

I always hear about matter converting to 'energy' - fusion, fission. When does it go the other way around? What conditions lead to it? Are there reproducible experiments on this topic?
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4answers
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Why is energy in a wave proportional to amplitude squared

I'm a mathematics student trying to grasp some basics about wave propagation. A sentence I find very often in introductive physics textbooks is the following: In a wave, energy is proportional to ...
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3answers
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Force as gradient of scalar potential energy

My text book reads If a particle is acted upon by the forces which are conservative; that is, if the forces are derivable from a scalar potential energy function in manner $ F=-\nabla V $. I ...
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2answers
426 views

why egg cooks slowly in mountains?

A quick Google tells me "Because water boils at a lower temperature at high altitudes". But I am not being able to understand this answer and fill-in the gap. Like, how does an egg cook in the first ...
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5answers
3k views

How do we perceive hotness or coldness of an object?

Some objects, especially metallic ones, feel cold on touching and others like wood, etc. feel warm on touching. Both are exposed to same environment and are in their stable state, so some kind of ...
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1answer
1k views

How does liquid convert to gas on getting thermal heat energy?

Say for example, when we heat, water converts to steam gas. How does it happen? What happens underneath giving rise to breaking of bond between molecules in liquid state and spreading them in gas ...
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3answers
4k views

Net work done on the body when we lift it and put it on the table is zero?

I'm little confused here. Work done on the body when we lift it and put it on the table is zero, because according to work energy theorem, change in kinetic energy of the body is zero. So, the net ...
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2answers
1k views

Is the E-cat by Andrea Rossi et al. for real?

Does this thing really do what they say? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EhvD4KuAEmo If it does, it looks like this will probably be the biggest breakthrough in science ever :)
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2answers
15k views

Difference between momentum and kinetic energy

From a mathematical point of view it seems to be clear what's the difference between momentum and $mv$ and kinetic energy $\frac{1}{2} m v^2$. Now my problem is the following: Suppose you want to ...
5
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5answers
405 views

Which subjects in physics should I choose if I want to help tackling today's energy and environment related problems? [closed]

I was wondering what subjects a freshman in mathematics ought to choose in the future if s/he wanted to help working on energy and environment-related issues we are currently facing, and will very ...
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2answers
2k views

If electric charges accelerate towards lower potential energies, why do opposite charges attract?

I know my logic must be wrong but I can't figure out why. I know that charges must accelerate towards lower potential energies simply because that's a general rule of nature. However, when you release ...
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1answer
216 views

Depalma Free Energy fields

Few years ago I read some papers about Free Energy, written by Bruce de Palma, a physicist who is said to be the inventor of the N-Machine, which is an device that works with free energy latent in the ...
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2answers
154 views

Do asymptotically similar potentials yield similar energy levels asymptotically?

Let there be given two Hamiltonians $$H_1~=~ p^{2}+f(x) \qquad \mathrm{and} \qquad H_2~=~ p^{2}+g(x). $$ Let's suppose that for big big $x$, the potentials are asymptotically similar in the sense ...
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1answer
163 views

Is there a theortical limit to the amount of sound-energy air can contain?

is there a theoretical limit to the amount of sound energy air can contain? In case, there is a limit, what is that limit?
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3answers
289 views

Do we have control on what an electron transition emits: light or heat?

I don't know quantum mechanical model. So, I'm referring to just bohr's model of atom. Any atom emits energy when it makes transition from higher excited state to lower excited state. Now, some times ...
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2answers
470 views

Kinetic energy puzzle

System S1 moves at constant speed V with respect to S0 in one dimension: ...
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0answers
84 views

When will the moon fall down? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are tidal power plants slowing down Earth's rotation? I've heard that there are turbines converting energy from tidal waves. Tidal waves are created by the moon's ...
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3answers
385 views

Is the continuous transformation of energy from one form to another one free? Or it consumes some quantity of who knows what?

Sorry for the unclarity. I probably created some bias in your mind having tagged my question with energy-conservation and conservation-laws. I simply consider that, relatively independently of ...
5
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2answers
950 views

Energy operator

Does the Hamiltonian always translate to the energy of a system? What about in QM? So by the Schrodinger equation, is it true then that $i\hbar{\partial\over\partial t}|\psi\rangle=H|\psi\rangle$ ...
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3answers
2k views

Conservation of energy and Doppler effect?

From what I understand, the frequency of light coming from the source moving towards an observer increases. From $ E=hv $ , this implies increase in energy of photon. What really is confusing, is ...
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2answers
391 views

What is changing in latest light bulb technologies?

I'm confused with the latest home lightning bulbs. Understanding filament bulbs was easy. For example take 220V, 100W filament bulb: Power = $V^2/R$ Filament gets heated and emits energy in the form ...
3
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4answers
1k views

Basic question concerning pure energy

Inside the core of a star thermonuclear fusion reaction fuses hydrogen atom into helium releasing massive heat/light and energy.When a blackhole eats up enough stars and gases it devours itself by ...
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1answer
630 views

How to teach the concepts of “Electric Potential” & “Potential Energy” to 10th grade students

I've got to teach the concepts of "Electric Potential" & "Potential Energy" to 10th grade students. I don't understand how to express these things and make them understand. “If you can't ...
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0answers
96 views

Masses of all the particles in the Standard Theory [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: If photons have no mass, how can they have momentum? I'm sure this question has been asked here before but I wasn't able to find it clearly answered in one q/a session. ...
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2answers
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Does space have to be filled with charged particles to carry electromagnetic waves?

I'm a newbie here so have mercy. I'm studying electromagnetic waves. This is the propagation of energy via the vibration of charged particles, as I understand it. A charged particle could be like ...
3
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2answers
797 views

What are nuclear isomers? What is isomeric energy?

Can someone explain nuclear isomers to me, and in particular what the energy involved is? I understand generally that we're talking about moving from a less to more stable configuration of nuclear ...
2
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2answers
253 views

In continuum mechanics, what is work potential in the context of total potential energy?

I'm reading a book on the finite element method. Specifically I'm looking at the background material where they are discussing potential energy, equilibrium, and the Rayleigh–Ritz method. The book ...
3
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4answers
603 views

Why does the density of states in a solid scale as $\sqrt{E}$?

In three dimensions, the density of states of a free electron is the square root of the energy of the electron. Can somebody explain the relationship between this dependence and the shape/formation of ...
3
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2answers
215 views

Does magnetic geometry determine the scaling of a Polywell fusor?

Does magnetic geometry determine the scaling of a Polywell fusor? Forgive imprecise terminology here - by "magnetic geometry" I mean the configuration of the magnets, the configuration that creates ...
3
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3answers
4k views

Why is the energy density of gasoline so high?

We sometimes play a game in my family whereby we trace the energy for a device back to it's source: The Xbox got power from the wall. The wall got power from the local transformer. The transformer ...
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1answer
180 views

The energy carried from one winding of a transformer to another, in quantum terms

I have read in wikipedia this statement "The energy carried from one winding of a transformer to another, in quantum terms is carried by virtual photons, not real photons" (wikipedia src: virtual ...
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5answers
9k views

What is Energy made of?

We have the famous equation $E = mc^2$, and we also believe that matter is made of particles. Then, What is the energy made of? If the two are interchangeable, there must be some common building ...
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2answers
1k views

Formula for getting energy required to accelerate to a certain speed?

I am curious how many newtons it takes to accelerate an object with a given coefficient of drag, reference area, weight, and air pressure? I know this may sound like a simple equation but I have no ...
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2answers
10k views

What happens to the absorbed light energy?

When light comes across with a solid material, some of it is reflected, some of it passes through and some of it is absorbed. I understand the reflection and passing through, but I don't understand ...
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1answer
306 views

calculating of g force in fun ride

we vistited yesterday a fun park and saw a ride which was a big centrifuge only in vertical. this one had a speed meter but it was broken and i also wanted to know how much g-force is on there... so ...
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3answers
605 views

a priori validity of $W=\int Fdx$ in relativity?

There are lots of different ways of arriving at the relativistic relations involving mass, energy, and momentum such as $E=mc^2$ and $m^2=E^2-p^2$ (the latter with $c=1$). One that I've seen in some ...
7
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2answers
435 views

Does rotational energy have effect on gravity/metric?

Intuitively, if energy can be stored in rotational motion, it has to obey $E=mc^2$. Does rotation of typical stellar-sized objects - BHs, pulsars, binaries - have measurable effect on their overall ...
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3answers
551 views

Can temperature be defined as propensity to transmit thermal energy?

I was recently surprised to learn that defining temperature isn't easy. For a long time, it was defined operationally: how much does a thermometer expand. Also surprising, temperature isn't a ...
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2answers
858 views

What is the highest energy position for a double pendulum? And for which energy positions is it chaotic?

Math/physics teachers love to break out the double pendulum as an example of chaotic motion that is very sensitive to initial conditions. I have some questions about specific properties: For a ...
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1answer
380 views

Using mass of the observable Universe to estimate an energy equivalent

For quite some time now, physicists have been able to estimate the mass of the observable universe. Reportedly it's around $10^{50} \:\mathrm{kg}$. There is also general relativity, which states ...