Energy is a quantity which gives an overview of the amount of work doable by the system.

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Energy versus free-energy diagram

Energy versus free energy diagram. I haven't been able to find an adequate definition of these two terms in relation to each other. Could someone point me in the right direction, please? From Borrell ...
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What meaning do changes in the absolute value of Gibbs free energy have in a simple expansion process?

Below is a simple representation of the thermodynamics of a steam turbine. Stream kinetic and potential energy changes are neglected and no other type of non-PV work is done besides shaft work. ...
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255 views

Tubelights+power lines pictures?

I've come across many pictures like these, sometimes in chain emails reporting the dangers of power lines. Another claim is that they run on "wasted" energy. The explanations given are that the ...
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Is fire matter or energy?

I wanted to know that if FIRE is Matter or Energy. I know that both are inter-convertible. but that doesn't mean there is interconversion taking place just like nuclear fusion or fission. If it is ...
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In what situations do I use the characteristic length of a fin to find the surface area?

So I'm learning about fins in heat transfer and it seems that there are two separate formulas for the surface area of a rectangular fin of length L, width w and thickness t. The fin is attached to a ...
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How much of the energy from 1 megaton H Bomb explosion could we capture to do useful work?

The world is full of nuclear warheads being stockpiled. Controlled fusion power seems a long way away. Could we put these warheads to better use by exploding them in a controlled way and capturing ...
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150 views

What will be the unit of mass in $E=mc^2$ when energy units change?

I know that conventionally the unit of $E$ in $E=mc^2$ is taken as joules when mass is in $\mathrm{kg}$. But I am doing some calculations of my own with different units of energy ...
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86 views

Lower state of energy for 'connected' molecules

Quote from Wikipedia: Another way to view surface tension is in terms of energy. A molecule in contact with a neighbor is in a lower state of energy than if it were alone (not in contact with a ...
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358 views

Connection between momentum and energy

What is the connection between momentum and energy? Which of the answers is the correct? A particle can have zero momentum but energy. A particle can have zero energy but momentum. ...
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681 views

Work and Area under a Curve relating to Hooke's Law

If it takes work W to stretch a Hooke’s-law spring (F = kx) a distance d from its unstressed length, determine the extra work required to stretch it an additional distance d (Hint: draw a graph and ...
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431 views

storing energy (as mass)

When chemical energy is released mass is reduced, if only by a negligible amount. Presumably that's true for all energy. And presumably that works in reverse as well: storing energy involves an ...
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576 views

How do I find average temperature given a temperature distribution?

I was told to find the temperature distribution of a wire with a current going through it. So I found $$T(x)=T_{\infty}-\frac{\dot{q}}{km^{2}}[\frac{cosh(mx)}{cosh(mL)}-1]$$ I need to find the ...
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246 views

Negative energies and a partition function

I'm writing down the partition function for a system, for which I know the dispersion relation $$E \left( \mathbf{k} \right) = \sqrt{ \left| \mathbf{k} \right|^2 + m^2 + \cdots }$$ The exact form is ...
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888 views

What does activation energy actually do?

Spontaneous (exothermic) chemical reactions often require a push from the addition of externally supplied energy. This energy is often called activation energy. What does activation energy actually ...
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1k views

Is the curvature of space around mass independent of gravity?

Is the curvature of space caused by the local density of the energy in that area?Could gravity be a separate phenomenon only arising from the curvature of space? For instance if the density of energy ...
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2answers
330 views

Does EM radiation (any, i.e. RF), or sound, radiate everywhere at once?

I am having trouble understanding electromagnetic radiation (or waves in general, be it EM or sound). If I have a 1 Watt speaker, is it infinitely divided and spread out so that everyone in every ...
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203 views

Show that the energy levels of a particle in a specific potential are $E_n=(n+\frac{1}{2})h\omega-\frac{1}{2}\frac{F^2}{m\omega^2}$ [closed]

A particle of mass m moves on the x-axis under the influence of the potential $$V(x)=\frac{1}{2}m\omega^2x^2+Fx$$ Can anyone help me, using Schrödinger's equation in one dimension that the energy ...
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How equivalent are heat energy and work energy in connection with a spinning flywheel?

Let's say we have two identical spinning flywheels, that have arbitrary geometry, and are made of copper. Now we apply some heat energy at the center point of flywheel A, causing it to slow down a ...
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349 views

Momentum Energy and Higgs

So, as an object accelerates it gains energy. And energy is mass. So an object becomes more massive as it approaches the speed of light. But, if mass is ONLY due to an object's interaction with the ...
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92 views

Terminology question about energy

I'm looking for the appropriate term to use for what gets "used up" as potential energy is converted to heat and work. For example, some of the the energy in solar radiation is converted by ...
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Energy in an EM wave should depend on frequency

I just finished reading Feynman's Lectures on Physics vol.I, §34-9: "The momentum of light". The author explains that there is a relation between the wave 4-vector $k^{\mu}$ and the energy-momentum ...
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143 views

Energy required to reach 1 wavelength [closed]

I was curious if there was a forumla to find the energy required to reach 1 wavelength in a given substance. (or a vacumn if that's too hard). I am also wondering if this number can tell us anything ...
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289 views

When to use Heat Diffusivity eqn and when to use Fourier's law to find temperature distribution?

Let's say that there is a circular conical section that has diameter $D=.25x$ without any heat generation and I need to find the temperature distribution. Originially I thought I could use the heat ...
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177 views

Equation $H(q,p)=E$ is the equation of motion or energy-conservation law?

I do not completely understand, why do we consider Hamilton–Jacobi equation $H(q,p)=E$ as equation of motion, whereas it is looks like energy-conservation law?
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120 views

A terminological question about work and energy

Work is force applied over distance. Is it also reasonable to say that work is (the same thing as) the transfer of energy? When work is done, the equivalent energy is transferred. But if energy is ...
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677 views

Temperature change effected by electric heater [closed]

A 40-gallon electric water heater has a 10kW heating element. What will the water temperature be after 15 min of heating if the start temp is 50F degrees. There must be an equation. I can't find it ...
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309 views

Simple question about a gas in a box with a moving wall

David Albert is a philosopher of Science at Columbia. His book "Time and Chance" includes this example (p 36). A gas is confined on one side of a box with a removable wall. "Draw the wall out, ...
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203 views

How much energy does lowering an object into a black hole generate?

An object of mass m is slowly lowered into a black hole of mass 1000 m. Is the amount of braking energy larger than $0.6 mc^2$? Now what if, after lowering the mass close to the event horizon, we ...
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152 views

Do asymptotically similar potentials yield similar energy levels asymptotically?

Let there be given two Hamiltonians $$H_1~=~ p^{2}+f(x) \qquad \mathrm{and} \qquad H_2~=~ p^{2}+g(x). $$ Let's suppose that for big big $x$, the potentials are asymptotically similar in the sense ...
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32 views

How much energy should I give into each particle in this equation:

I am trying to recreate the results of an article (membrane simulation) and I have the following line: Both particles have the same soft radius, $U_{rep} (r)/\epsilon = \text{exp}\left\{ -20 ...
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403 views

Which subjects in physics should I choose if I want to help tackling today's energy and environment related problems? [closed]

I was wondering what subjects a freshman in mathematics ought to choose in the future if s/he wanted to help working on energy and environment-related issues we are currently facing, and will very ...
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959 views

Kinetic energy absorbing in order to avoid damages?

is this possible? To absorb kinetic energy and disable inertia force? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnKPbAbJI0w http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_5oseSVUc4
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147 views

Will a photon emitted from something moving quickly have a shorter wavelength?

If a photon is emitted from a light source moving at any speed, the photon will nonetheless always move at c (assuming it is emitted in a vacuum.) If the speed of a photon's emitter cannot influence ...
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Why is the work positive here?

Problem http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/ap11_frq_physics_b_formb.pdf Please refer to question 1f Solutions ...
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If humans were able to catch all sun energy reaching the earth for their use, will the climate change?

I guess that energy will be used up and, at the end, will contribute to heat the earth, so I see no big differences... please explain your point of view.
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Extracting heat energy from a material

Does it violate any physical laws to take a portion of the energy out of a system and use it? Specifically I'm referring to heat. (Kinetic energy). For example, if you have a material which has a lot ...
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Violation of conservation of energy and potential energy between objects

I would like to clarify my question. I have numbered them to be independent questions For any conservative fields, $\vec{F} = -\nabla U$. Which means the restoring force is opposite to the ...
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Practical personal aircraft today? [closed]

Is it possible to build, today, a personal aircraft that not use an impracticable amount of fuel for everyday use? What are the physical concepts that could be used to build it?
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394 views

Spin angular momentum of a system of particles : Is there any energy associated with it?

Consider a system of point particles , where the mass of particle $i$ is $μ_i$ and its position vector is $\vec{r}_i$. Let $\vec{r}_\text{cm}$ is the position vector of the center of mass of the ...
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Is there a measure of internal energy flow?

A system might have internal energy and/or kinetic energy. Kinetic energy in classical mechanics is a form of energy the object has, only because of its relative movement to other objects. If you ...
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429 views

Thermal energy generated due to loss in kinetic energy when observed from two different frames of reference

A body is moving with a velocity $v$ with respect to a frame of reference $S_1$. It bumps into a very heavy object and comes to rest instantaneously, its kinetic energy $$\frac{1}{2}mv^2$$ as ...
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544 views

Can temperature be defined as propensity to transmit thermal energy?

I was recently surprised to learn that defining temperature isn't easy. For a long time, it was defined operationally: how much does a thermometer expand. Also surprising, temperature isn't a ...
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473 views

What is a single word that describes the idea of the second time derivative of energy?

I think about position, its time derivative speed, and its second time derivative, acceleration. I would like to identify a single word that can be used as a handle for the second time derivative of ...
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Is there a theory which treats particles as classical point singularities?

Is there a published theory that looks at all matter as occupying no space and only being felt because of its gravitational pull? We've been taught in school that matter has mass and occupies space. ...
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Is the energy coming from sun to earth completely sent back?

So energy comes to earth from sun in the form of EM waves. Some of it is reflected back but some of it remains on earth and is used by plants to create food and some is used in the atmosphere creating ...
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373 views

Einstein's Mass-Energy Equivalence versus Quantum Kinetic Energy

Using a naive view of Einstein's Energy Mass Equivalence $E=mc^2$ (where m is mass and c is the speed of light), it seems tempting to interpret this as a quantum mechanical version of the inherent ...
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Energy transferring question

If I have a spring being compressed by two bodies, A and B, with different masses, how much energy would be transferred to each one when they are released and the spring expanded?
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Is the Energy Sharply or Fuzzily Defined in Quantum Mechanics?

According to quantum mechanics, energy of a state is uncertain within a small range in hydrogen atom. But we also know that energy of a state is quantized which is contradictory to the first. Which ...
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What happens to a rotating rod that breaks in two?

I know that the approximation for the moment of inertia of an infinitely thin rod of mass $m$ and length $L$ spinning around an axis perpendicular to its own axis at its center is $\frac{mL^2}{3}$: ...
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What “I” should use in Rotational Energy formula $(I \omega^2)/2$

$\text{Rotational Energy} = \frac{1}{2} I \omega^2$. What $I$ should be used? $I$ as a inertia tensor matrix = stepRotation * inverse moment of inertia * inverse stepRotation; Or I as moment of ...