Energy is the conserved quantity associated to time-translation invariance and represents the work a system is capable of doing. Use this tag for questions about energy, and consider adding [tag:energy-conservation] if it is specifically about its conservation.

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Is a real life electric shield possible? [closed]

I got this question from playing games like Halo and Borderlands (I know kinda dumb but raised a good question) in which the primary protection is an electric shield. Now I'm wondering if it would be ...
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Total mechanical energy concept

I was solving a true or false question regarding total mechanical energy and the following was the problem. It is possible for a moving object to have negative total mechanical energy. This is ...
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How can one calculate the gamma-ray energy spectrum for proton-proton collisions?

How does one calculate the the energy spectrum of gamma-rays produced by a proton-proton collision? I'm at a complete loss.
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Why is kinetic energy only “often $(1/2)mv^2$”?

I am reading the first few pages of Nakahara and refreshing my memory on physics I learned a while ago as a physics math undergrad. Nakahara defines a field $F$ to be conservative if it's the gradient ...
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Potential and Kinetic Energy

In engineering school you learn the basic swing problem. Essentially that there is a transfer of kinetic energy (as seen in the velocity at the bottom of as swing) to potential energy at the top of ...
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Minimization of energy and maximization of entropy

Are maximization of entropy and minimization of energy equivalent? Or are they contrary? Why should the thermodynamic potentials such as $G$, $A$, etc, be minimum at equilibrium? I am confused. ...
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White Dwarf radius

So I've been reading this about white dwarves, and various other sites about white dwarves. In all of them, they say that we can find the radius of a white dwarf by minimizing its total energy. I know ...
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What limits the velocity of ships such as voyager 1?

Voyager 1 travels at a small fraction of light speed. I've read it's fueled by hydrazine, which is a cheap combustive. Questions: What factors limit the speed of voyager 1 and similar rockets? Are ...
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Is it possible to condense heat?

Suppose that I have a warm room. Is it possible to condense the heat of the room into a small object so that the room turns cold and the small object very hot? If it's possible: How? If it's not: Why?...
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Is light affected by gravity? Why?

I would like to know if light is affected by gravity, also, I would like to know what is the correct definition of gravity: "A force that attracts bodies with mass" or "a force that attracts bodies ...
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Explanation of energy levels in molecules, atoms, nuclei and their relationship

Why are the energy levels of molecules, the atoms that form them and the nuclei inside the atoms considered separately? Or phrased in a different way- what is it that makes their energy levels so ...
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Elastic Collision And Momentum

The question I am working on is, "Two blocks are free to slide along the friction-less wooden track shown below. The block of mass $m_1 = 4.98~kg$ is released from the position shown, at height $h = 5....
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How to accurately explain evaporative cooling?

I am trying to clearly express in one or two sentences how increased evapotranspiration could cool a region. The audience is educated but non-scientific. Is it accurate to say that the water vapor ...
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Why is “space-time” not fully explained as the observational effect of the casimir effect seen from a human perspective?

Simply stated the casimir effect can be observed bringing two plates together microscopically and in vaccum Is this analogous to the observation of gravity? Question: What is casimir effect? ...
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Is energy “destroyed” when walking?

Conservation of energy states energy can't be destroyed, but isn't energy used up when walking in a straight line? If your not walking up a slope, kinetic energy isn't converted to gravitational ...
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Neutrino beam energy

Neutrino is one of the most mysterious particles in todays physics. Even when values of some parameters like for example mass associated with it are not known (or there is great range of possible ...
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A terminological question about work and energy

Work is force applied over distance. Is it also reasonable to say that work is (the same thing as) the transfer of energy? When work is done, the equivalent energy is transferred. But if energy is ...
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Could someone remind me what this means again? $\nabla U = \pm F$

You know that for a potential function (conservative force/fields) that $\nabla U = \pm \vec{F}$ In math, we don't have that minus sign, we have only the plus one. What does it mean if you get rid ...
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Einstein's Mass-Energy Equivalence versus Quantum Kinetic Energy

Using a naive view of Einstein's Energy Mass Equivalence $E=mc^2$ (where m is mass and c is the speed of light), it seems tempting to interpret this as a quantum mechanical version of the inherent ...
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How does liquid convert to gas on getting thermal heat energy?

Say for example, when we heat, water converts to steam gas. How does it happen? What happens underneath giving rise to breaking of bond between molecules in liquid state and spreading them in gas ...
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Using mass of the observable Universe to estimate an energy equivalent

For quite some time now, physicists have been able to estimate the mass of the observable universe. Reportedly it's around $10^{50} \:\mathrm{kg}$. There is also general relativity, which states ...
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Extracting heat energy from a material

Does it violate any physical laws to take a portion of the energy out of a system and use it? Specifically I'm referring to heat. (Kinetic energy). For example, if you have a material which has a lot ...
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276 views

Is there a theory about kinetic energy “particles”? [closed]

We have a model of electricity which says electrons flow from one place to another. We have a model of optics which says that photons go from one place to another. As I understand, there is currently ...
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Do induction chargers waste electricity?

Do induction chargers use more energy than traditional chargers while plugged in to the mains but not charging a device?
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Horizontal rolling without slipping

I'm trying to find the friction coefficient that makes the body roll without slipping but I just can't reach a value. The force is applied on a small central disk of radius $r=0,03\, m$ and mass $m=0,...
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Where does energy go in the death of the Universe?

So I thought that energy can't be destroyed or created but can only be transformed into another kind of energy. I read something about the Universe dying because all the stars will burn out and the ...
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Relation between field and Potential energy of a body

I have read that if a body is in a field and is 1. moved in a direction opposite to the direction of a field, its potential energy increases.But why does it increase? 2.Also, if we move the body in a ...
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Energy of photon after emission

Exercise: A hydrogen atom is at its first excited state. When it de-excites it emits a photon. What is the energy of the photon and the kinetic energy of the atom? Question: Is it correct to ...
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The energy of de-excitation

I am 10th class student and what i dont get is when electron dexcites it produces energy but what is main phenomenon which produces energy is it the motion of electron or something like disturbing ...
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what is the energy required to change only direction of a vector? [closed]

Does change in velocity vector change Kinetic energy of a system? Does any energy change when we change direction of a vector of a system?
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How are probe liquids selected for Surface Energy measurements?

Why are water, ethylene glycol and diiodomethane generally used for surface energy measurement?
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Projectiles ability to do work to a box when connected by string? [closed]

I was wondering, the work-energy theorem states that KE can do work, as it is Mechanical energy. if the KE energy and thus Mechanical energy of a ball, if external...can do work on an object, ...
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Energy of a body in circular motion?

I'm confused about energy of a body in circular motion. In particular I'm having trouble to find the correct answer to this question. Consider the body in the picture that is set in motion from ...
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How can I calculate how high an arrow goes when all I know is its initial speed? [closed]

I'm not familiar with English physics terms so bear with me. If I shot an arrow straight up and it went off with a speed of 21 m/s, how high up would it go? (air resistance is insignificant). My ...
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Energy of electromagnetic wave

Its given here that energy density of an electromagnetic wave is $$\vec S=\frac{1}{\mu}(\vec E\times\vec B)$$ How is the above expression derived? And when did energy become a vector? I though work ...
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Is energy related to work or is it an entirely different thing?

I was reading about work done and energy, and I got to know some things. Let's take a simple example: Suppose I move an object to a certain height. Here, I apply a force against the force of gravity ...
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Reference frame and conservation of energy

Say spaceship $\alpha$ burns a portion of its fuel to leave planet A and is cruising through space at 10 m/s relative to the surface from which it launched. Spaceship $\alpha$ is being observed by ...
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How is momentum conserved when is is only dependent on mass and velocity, and so many other factors come into play?

I've been trying to get a good grip on the difference between conservation laws. Momentum is particularly tricky, I don't understand how quantities like $m\mathbf v$ can be conserved when other things ...
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Hot Chocolate- cooling itself down

If a hot cup of hot chocolate is just standing there, can it cool itself down by transferring the kinetic/thermal energy that the liquid has into the mug/cup?
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Transformation of energy of a photon

I'm new to the forum so excuse me if I'm doing anything in a wrong format. My question is this: A photon fired from a spaceship at rest has energy $E$, if the spaceship starts moving with speed $v=\...
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Fusing Hydrogen with lightning

I've been reading about fusion recently (Specifically Deuterium fusion) and a friend of mine asked me if it was possible to fuse two Deuterium atoms with a lightning strike? Now this question has a ...
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What's the right way to calculate power consumption over a month given a rate per minute?

When I was searching for power required to lift an object, i found that, for example: $100\ \mathrm{kg}$ to be lifted 3 metres in 5 seconds. (vertical) Answer: $$\begin{align} \text{mass}\times\...
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What is the main difference between a free particle on a line and a free particle on a circle?

The energy spectrum for a free particle in a circle with radius $r$ is $$E_n=\frac{n^2\hbar^2}{2mr^2}.$$ The energy spectrum for a free particle on an infinite line is similar. If so, what is the ...
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How much energy would be required to make one tea cup full of Earl Gray tea at 100F?

On the TV show "Star Trek: The Next Generation", Captain Picard is often pictured using a replicator to materialize a cup of "Earl Gray tea, hot". Besides wondering what they do with all the empty ...
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Deexcitation times for ytterbium

I need to find the deexcitation times for the transitions found in Figure 1 of Nature Phys. 8, 649 (2012), arXiv:1206.4507. That is, what is the deexcitation time for the following transitions: $$ ^...
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Contradiction of total energy of a system? [duplicate]

I consider a situation in a system in which an observer is sitting in body of mass $M$ and another observer in a body of mass $2M$, both moving with velocity $v$ towards each other. If observers in ...
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Poyting theorem for a plane wave

I would like to apply and verify the Poynting theorem for a uniform plane wave but there is obviously something wrong in my demonstration. The Poynting theorem expresses the conservation of energy: ...
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Expression deduction for energy density per wave length

Energy density per frequency is defined by Planck formula as: $$u(\nu,T)=\frac{8\pi h}{c^3} \frac{\nu^3}{e^{\frac{h\nu}{kT}}-1}$$ The relation between wave length, $\lambda$, and frequency, $\nu$, ...
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When i tear a paper, can i accidentally create nuclear fission?

I know it's a stupid question... but when I tear a paper i may coincidentally split it and create nuclear fission. When i tried experimenting, by tearing the paper for HELLKNOWS how many times, I ...
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Entropy reversal in magnets

Entropy is an irreversible phenomenon without any energy supplied to reverse it. I was reading about paramagnetic substances and how dipoles align inside them on application of magnetic field. My ...