1
vote
3answers
61 views

Placing two similarly charged particles in space

Now, I will make a hypothetical situation. Assume that we place two similarly charged particles (lets take electrons) in space. Imagine that there is no other force acting on the particles except the ...
2
votes
1answer
16 views

Minimum Power Required

Here is a question, I found two methods to solve it, differing in the answers and I'm not sure why a method is incorrect. Question: A fire hose of cross section area ...
0
votes
2answers
244 views

Rolling disk in inclined plane and flat plane? [duplicate]

A disk is rolling (not sliding) in the inclined plane with initial velocity of zero. So there is friction between disk and plane. But when we use the energy conservation rule, we consider as: ...
1
vote
2answers
88 views

Work producing current = energy stored in the magnetic field?

It is stated that "the formula for the energy stored in the magnetic field is: $$E = \left(\frac{1}{2}\right)(LI)^2$$ and the energy stored in the magnetic field is equal to the work done to produce ...
1
vote
1answer
675 views

What is happening to rotational kinetic energy when moment of inertia is changed?

I know this question is asked here a lot, but I just had to ask this to finalise the concept. When a system lets say a rod of length $L$ and mass $M$ is rotating with angular speed $omega_1$ its ...
0
votes
2answers
62 views

Finding the value of velocity $u$ [closed]

A block of mass $m$ is pushed towards a moveable wedge of mass $\eta m$ and height $h$, with a velocity $u$. All surfaces are smooth. The minimum value of $u$ for which the block will reach the top of ...
-2
votes
2answers
266 views

Work done by a conservative force

Wikipedia: A conservative force is a force with the property that the work done in moving a particle between two points is independent of the taken path. Equivalently, if a particle travels in a ...
0
votes
2answers
101 views

almost same mass, same distance, different energy needs

Imagine a car, driving 10 km at constant speed in 6th gear. There will be a measurable fuel consumption. Now imagine the same car driving 10 km again at a constant speed (same as above) in the 1st ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Proof of conservation of energy?

How is it proved to be always true? It's a fundamental principle in Physics, that is based on all of our currents observations of multiple systems in the universe, is it always true to all systems? ...
2
votes
2answers
273 views

Energy of electron spinning in a magnetic field

When an electron travels in circles in a uniform magnetic field, it must lose energy because all accelerated charges radiate, and must therefore spiral down to the center. Is this energy compensated ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

work done by tension

The problem statement, all variables and given/known data Consider the following arrangement: Calculate the work done by tension on 2kg block during its motion on circular track from point $A$ to ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Relation between work, kinetic energy and potential energy

We derived two equations in class. The work done between two points $A$, $B$ is equal to the difference between the kinetic energy at the last point and the one at the first point. The work done ...
2
votes
2answers
609 views

Having trouble understanding the work energy principle intuitively

I'm having trouble understanding the work energy principle intuitively. This is what I'm solid on so far: If you have a ball rolling down a hill, it loses potential energy and gains kinetic energy. ...
0
votes
4answers
180 views

Short-duration forces

In circular motion, it is said that the centripetal force acts only for a very very short period of time, hence is able to only change the direction but not magnitude of the velocity. Similarly in a ...
1
vote
6answers
975 views

Electrostatic Potential Energy Derivation

How is the boxed step , physically as well as mathematically justified and correct ? Source:Wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_potential_energy As work done = $- \Delta U $. for Conservative ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

How to understand the work-energy theorem?

How to understand the work-energy theorem? I took a short lecture on physics for engineering last week. The lecturer emphasized that the work done on an object will cause the kinetic energy change as ...
0
votes
2answers
920 views

Finding maximum speed in a work-energy problem

I have the following problem: The Royal Gorge bridge over the Arkansas River is $310\text{ m}$ above the river. A $57\text{ kg}$ bungee jumper has an elastic cord with an unstressed length of ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

Is the normal force a conservative force?

Most of the time the normal force doesn't do any work because it's perpendicular to the direction of motion but if it does do work, would it be conservative or non-conservative? For example, consider ...
2
votes
5answers
718 views

Is there a mathematical derivation of potential energy that is *not* rooted in the conservation of energy?

For simplicity I'll consider only gravity, but in general this question only applies to conservative forces. As per my understanding, the way one gets to the equation for gravitational potential ...
2
votes
1answer
195 views

Understanding Work and the conservation of energy

We have a car with a mass of $780 kg$ with travels with a speed of $50 km/h$. The car brakes and after $4,2m$ is stops completely. Warmth is created. Calculate the friction. I solved this easily, by ...
3
votes
2answers
223 views

When work is performed solely by magnetism, is there an equivalent loss of energy from the magnetic field?

When two magnets are placed within appropriate proximity and released, the attractive force will perform work and bring them together. Work is performed overcoming friction. Can we measure a ...
0
votes
2answers
6k views

Work done by spring over distance

I'm working through a problem involving energy conservation. Unfortunately, I cannot calculate the work done by a spring. ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Work done by the Magnetic Force

The magnetic part of the Lorentz force acts perpendicular to the charge's velocity, and consequently does zero work on it. Can we extrapolate this statement to say that such a nature of the force ...