2
votes
4answers
53 views

Is work done by how much velocity is changed or how much displacement is done?

A sailboat is moving at a constant velocity. Is work being done by a net external force acting on the boat? The answer key is "No" according to the work energy theorem about work is done when ...
-6
votes
0answers
27 views

Potential Energy and Kinetic Energy [on hold]

how does potential energy related to height? how does kinetic energy related to velocity? how does potential energy related to those kinetic energy? how does potential energy and kinetic energy ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

Changing from potential to kinetic energy

During a conversation with a friend, I began to wonder if there's is a term for the transformation of potential energy to kinetic energy, and vice versa.Is there a term for the process of converting ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

How is work done by a system in static equilibrium? [duplicate]

For a little colour: this came from my wondering why fork-lifts are hydraulically driven, rather than electromechanically. My question is this: why is it that some systems, while in static ...
2
votes
1answer
63 views

Does distance traveled by a vehicle after its engine has been switched off depend on its mass at all?

A vehicle moving with some velocity on a rough horizontal road finally comes to rest after its engine has been turned off. Intuitively, it seems a vehicle with greater mass would stop first because it ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

What is the relationship between Force and Kinetic Energy?

I am an Middle-School (Grade 8) student, who is self-learning classical mechanics. I saw this equation from Classical Mechanics: $\vec F=m \vec a$, the following equation is pretty straight forward ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Why is work not related to velocity?

A very simple question; why does it cost me more energy to very slowly lift a mass $m$ over my head compared to very fast? The definition of work does not state anything about velocity, only the ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Energy density and Carnot cycle

For example, diesel has about 40 MJ/kg, what does it mean? Is that if we burn it we will get 40 MJ of energy per kg, but we can not get all of it to mechanical work? If that is the case, then why ...
2
votes
3answers
112 views

Definition of force, kinetic energy and momentum

I've edited the post. Q1 and Q4 are the important ones but I didn't delete Q2 and Q3 since some older answers would not make sense anymore. To begin with, the formula of the kinetic energy $T$ is ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Applying conservation of energy to any system?

How would the conservation of energy be applied in any system? Can we always be certain that every system will always obey COE? How can we be certain without measuring the system? Input & Output? ...
4
votes
2answers
87 views

What exactly is ''electric energy''?

If the two fundamental types of energy are kinetic and potential energy, is electric energy simply the kinetic energy of charge carriers? Also, is the statement "A cell converts chemical potential ...
8
votes
3answers
733 views

Number of planks required to stop the bullet [closed]

A bullet looses (1/n)th of its velocity passing through one plank. The number of such planks that are required to stop the bullet can be? Logically, to me the answer seems to be infinity, as always a ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Work done or not in this case?

I have a very simple question. A motorboat directed upstream is seen to be at rest from the bank of a river. Is the engine doing any work? Is it right to say that since it is not causing any ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Work done (by gravity) on paired blocks [closed]

Why does gravity do more work on the block going down? The total work done (by gravity) on the $8kg$ block is more than the work done (by gravity) on the lighter block. How?
0
votes
3answers
39 views

Energy, time and force

Consider force $F$ acting on a body of mass 1000kg and the displacement be $s$. So energy required to do so is $F$x $s$. Now consider the same force causing same displacement on body of mass 1kg. ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

The context of definition of work [duplicate]

It is unclear whether the work is defined considering opposite force on the same body or in ideal case where there is a single force acting on a body.If we consider ideal case where only a single ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

What is Work? What does the quantity suggest intuitively? [duplicate]

The mathematical formula for work says that work is force into displacement, but what is the philosophy behind it? I mean what does the quantity suggest?
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Can Somebody give me Questions [closed]

Can someone give me questions on physics because I have my Examination tomorrow Class 9th (CBSE) topic : - Fluids(Density,buoyant Force , Archemedis Principal) , Work Power Energy(Work Basics, ...
0
votes
2answers
244 views

Rolling disk in inclined plane and flat plane? [duplicate]

A disk is rolling (not sliding) in the inclined plane with initial velocity of zero. So there is friction between disk and plane. But when we use the energy conservation rule, we consider as: ...
1
vote
1answer
286 views

Why doesn't the potential energy of any object equal 0

Consider a particle on the ground. This particle is raised by a force of magnitude $mg$ to a height $h$ above the ground. At this point, the work done on the particle by the force is $mgh$, which is ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

How come weight doesn't affect the rebound height on a net?

According to my text book two unequal masses, (80kg and 50kg) fall on a net and the work done by that net is calculated by $\frac{1}{2}kx^2$. This work is then transformed into kinetic energy for both ...
0
votes
1answer
142 views

Is it true that a Space Shuttle launch is powerful like an “average” nuclear explosion?

Kind of an odd question here. First let's define what an "average" nuclear explosion is, because that's quite a controversial term - "average". Considering that the peak of nuclear tests was at the ...
2
votes
2answers
185 views

Question related to work done and energy

Suppose you lift a box from the ground over your head. You will be using energy as there is work done. But when you keep the box lifted over your head, aren't you using any extra energy?
-1
votes
4answers
646 views

Is potential energy and “work done” the same thing?

Is potential energy and "work done" the same thing? If they are not one and the same thing then why is potential energy always associated with "work done"? Could you explain me with some examples?
4
votes
2answers
470 views

Is any work done if I walk in a circle?

My friend and I were arguing about this and I was wondering if someone out there could settle this for us. Basically, he and I were walking to buy some stamps. When we were on our return trip he ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

Exertion from swinging on a playground swing

I've read about how by tilting one's body one changes one's center of mass while swinging on a playground swing, and thereby increases the energy of the swing. But I would like to get a better sense ...
1
vote
2answers
168 views

Does gravity exert more “power” when an object is traveling faster?

So, this question arose when I was pondering the meaning of horsepower and torque in cars. I thought of the following question: There is a 1 kilogram weight on planet M. Planet M has no atmosphere ...
0
votes
1answer
257 views

Calories burned doing 1 squat [closed]

To calculate the calories burned doing 1 squat, wouldn't it simply involve the distance that your center of mass is moving and your weight? I read some other article that said your legs act as levers, ...
4
votes
2answers
131 views

Work done on stationary rocket

Suppose I have a rocket thats exerts a force (with negligible loses in mass), which cancels out the downward force of gravity. Clearly my rocket could be moving at a constant velocity (ignore air ...
0
votes
2answers
101 views

almost same mass, same distance, different energy needs

Imagine a car, driving 10 km at constant speed in 6th gear. There will be a measurable fuel consumption. Now imagine the same car driving 10 km again at a constant speed (same as above) in the 1st ...
0
votes
1answer
550 views

Solve a problem of work and energy

A man pulling sled of his daughter by a massless rope, climbing a snowy hill whose slope is equal to 15 °. Considering that the mass of the sled is $4Kg$, the girl's $26Kg$ and $\mu _c = 0,25$, ...
0
votes
2answers
589 views

Why does the amount of energy transferred depend on distance rather than time?

The change in energy of an object can be determined by the work equation, where work is the change in energy: $$ W = F \cdot d $$ I conceptualize the transfer of energy as simply a series of small ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Proof of conservation of energy?

How is it proved to be always true? It's a fundamental principle in Physics, that is based on all of our currents observations of multiple systems in the universe, is it always true to all systems? ...
2
votes
1answer
232 views

A dielectric table is being inserted between a plate capacitor and $\triangle U<0$ how to deduce the table is attracted to the plates?

I am practicing for an exam in my Physics $2$ course. One of a previews exam questions described a plate capacitor and asked to calculate the initial energy $U_{0}$, then a dielectric table was ...
0
votes
2answers
111 views

what is “work”? (of a force)

I would like to know why two forces (of different magnitudes but same direction) that we'd use sequentially on an object to move it by the same amount twice, will produce two different values for the ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Work, Energy & Power - Body slides down a hemisphere

A small body of mass $m$ slides down from the top of a hemisphere of radius $r$. There is no friction between the surface of the block and the hemisphere. The height at which the body loses contact ...
0
votes
0answers
95 views

Collision of two deformable bodies - limitation of work-energy theorem

I am attempting to model the impact of a deformable body (clean, dry sand characterized as a continuous fluid) with flexible diaphragm (in this case a sheet of rubber). Assuming that this is a closed ...
2
votes
2answers
273 views

Energy of electron spinning in a magnetic field

When an electron travels in circles in a uniform magnetic field, it must lose energy because all accelerated charges radiate, and must therefore spiral down to the center. Is this energy compensated ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Relation between work, kinetic energy and potential energy

We derived two equations in class. The work done between two points $A$, $B$ is equal to the difference between the kinetic energy at the last point and the one at the first point. The work done ...
2
votes
2answers
609 views

Having trouble understanding the work energy principle intuitively

I'm having trouble understanding the work energy principle intuitively. This is what I'm solid on so far: If you have a ball rolling down a hill, it loses potential energy and gains kinetic energy. ...
7
votes
2answers
15k views

Conceptually, what is negative work?

I'm having some trouble understanding the concept of negative work. For example, my book says that if I lower a box to the ground, the box does positive work on my hands and my hands do negative work ...
5
votes
1answer
284 views

First law of thermodynamics?

The first law says that the change in internal energy is equal to the work done on the system (W) minus the work done by the system (Q). However, can $Q$ be any kind of work, such as mechanical work? ...
1
vote
1answer
232 views

calculating work done by friction

I want to calculate the work done by friction if the length $L$ of uniform rope on the table slides off. There is friction between the cord and the table with coefficient of kinetic friction $\mu_k$. ...
2
votes
1answer
182 views

Work done by gravity on Water

Now according to me we would see change in potential energy of system and equate it to the work done by gravity. But when we see this the first column lowers by $H/2$ and right one rises by $H/2$ ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

How to understand the work-energy theorem?

How to understand the work-energy theorem? I took a short lecture on physics for engineering last week. The lecturer emphasized that the work done on an object will cause the kinetic energy change as ...
0
votes
1answer
159 views

Why work to change velocity from 0 to 20 km/h is less then from 20 to 40? [duplicate]

Imagine spaceship in vacuum with mass = 1. At beginning, it has velocity 0, and kinetic energy 0. $$W_1 = 0$$ Then, it turns on its engine, and changes velocity from 0 to 20 (delta v = 20). It's ...
1
vote
3answers
765 views

Integration by parts to derive relativistic kinetic energy

I have come across a weird integration during derivation of relativistic kinetic energy. Our professor states that i can get RHS out of LHS using integration by parts: $$ \int\limits_0^x \! ...
0
votes
2answers
920 views

Finding maximum speed in a work-energy problem

I have the following problem: The Royal Gorge bridge over the Arkansas River is $310\text{ m}$ above the river. A $57\text{ kg}$ bungee jumper has an elastic cord with an unstressed length of ...
4
votes
3answers
181 views

When can one write $a=v \cdot dv/dx$?

Referring to unidimensional motion, it is obvious that it doesn't always make sense to write the speed as a function of position. Seems to me that this is a necessary condition to derive formulas ...
4
votes
2answers
146 views

Conservative Force and $1/r^2$

Does the inverse square law have anything to do with conservative behavior of the central forces?