1
vote
1answer
36 views

Time energy uncertainty principle [duplicate]

$ \sigma _{H}\sigma _{Q}\geqslant \frac{h}{4\pi }\frac{d\left \langle Q \right \rangle}{dt}$ $\Delta E = \sigma _{H}$ $\Delta t = \frac{\sigma _{Q}}{d\left \langle Q \right \rangle / dt}$ $\Delta E ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

How can a photon exist on its own without a mass? [duplicate]

For example, thermal energy exists and has no mass, but is carried by particles which have mass. A photon is described as a particle - how can a photon exist on its own, travel in space and even push ...
0
votes
2answers
33 views

Bound states, scattering states and infinite potentials

I am doing my first semester of Quantum Mechanics and we're using Griffith's Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. As he is introducing the Dirac delta function potential he explains bound and scattering ...
3
votes
3answers
237 views

Why are the energy eigenstates realized in atomic transitions?

I have a question like "Why is it often assumed that particles are found in energy eigenstates?", it is a little different, though. When one solves the hydrogen atom, one can use a polynomial Ansatz ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

Could symmetric molecular stretching cause a physical object to become amorphous? [closed]

I understand very little of this, but my google-foo has yielded me next to nothing, I thought I might then just ask. My real question here is if it might be possible through the use of vibration to ...
1
vote
2answers
96 views

Bloch theorem, Energy, Free electron

I'm trying to learn on my own a bit of solid physics to tackle semiconductors afterwards. I'm struggling with the Energy versus $k$ diagrams for a free electron which shows that for a single value of ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Radius dependence of Energy levels of spherical Quantum dots

I have frequently read in articles that the energy level of spherical quantum dots depends on radius. We simply match the wave functions inside and outside the particle and find the intersection of ...
7
votes
1answer
183 views

Classical vs. quantum energy of the hydrogen atom

If I have an electron and a proton and calculate the classical energy which I get by bringing the electron from infinity to the distance of a Bohr radius to the proton, I get 27.2 eV, but the electron ...
1
vote
2answers
55 views

What is the energy operator and from where do we get it?

I am trying to learn Quantum mechanics from MIT OCW Videos about quantum mechanics. I have reached the 5th lecture. Please help me in understanding this: In the middle (At 32:08), the professor wrote ...
5
votes
1answer
90 views

What does the Higgs boson have to do with the uncertainty principle and quantum oscillations?

I was looking in New Scientist the other day when I saw something to do with the Higgs boson, energy levels, entropy, space/time, quantum oscillations and many other things. It was in a feature to do ...
15
votes
4answers
2k views

Why do we need high energy to explore small dimensions?

I am taking a quantum physics class, and for the life of me, I can not remember why we would need a vast amount of energy to understand the microscopic universe.
0
votes
2answers
69 views

Calculating Quantum number from initial conditions

I have solved the particle in a box problem to get energy eigenstates and wave vectors: $$E_{n}=\frac{\hbar^{2} k^2}{2m} ,\hspace{1cm} k_{n}=\frac{\pi n}{L}$$ And now I am trying to figure out how ...
1
vote
2answers
46 views

Energy of an EM Wave and its temperature and amplitude

I'm trying to understand why classical physics fails to explain black body radiation. I'm confused. According to Boltzmann, energy calculation for em wave is based on temperature. According to ...
2
votes
2answers
109 views

Ground state of a quantum mechanical system

When looking back at my courses of quantum mechanics, I noticed that assumptions about the ground state of a quantum mechanical system where rather vague and unprecise. It is always assumed that a ...
1
vote
1answer
108 views

Unstable states and imaginary (complex) energy?

I came across the notion of complex energy while studying instanton method to study the unstable state. Unstable states are those which have energy with an imaginary part. But as we know Hamiltonian ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Hamiltonian (temperature?) and frame of reference

So we can define a particle by defining its kinetic and potential energy, knowing that we can get a wavefunction describing a particle. But the kinetic energy involves motion, and motion can be ...
5
votes
0answers
99 views

Could energy be stored into (not extracted from) the quantum zero point field (like a battery)?

In order to explain the question clearly, I will make a short introduction. In 1962, Josephson predicted that for a sufficiently thin insulating layer, it should be possible for Cooper pairs to ...
2
votes
3answers
174 views

Do ionisation of atoms release photons?

I was reading through my text book about Fluorescence. It said "inside a fluorescent bulb, the mecury atoms collide with each other and with electrons get excited and ionised. During de-excitation, ...
1
vote
1answer
106 views

Nonzero ground state energy of the quantum harmonic oscillator [duplicate]

Since $\frac{1}{2}\hbar \omega$ is the zero point energy of the ground state of the harmonic oscillator, then there is no way to extract this energy. Therefore, in what way is this value different ...
-1
votes
1answer
30 views

Atoms and their bonds in an explosion

I was watching a video and when the car did blow up I asked to me... what happens with the atoms and their bonds when an object blows up of this way? what is the behavior of the atoms and their bonds ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

Extra energy in quantum tunneling

In quantum tunneling, the probability of finding an electron inside the potential barrier is non zero (http://i.stack.imgur.com/v8Kr1.gif). So we can actually find an electron which had an energy E in ...
8
votes
3answers
970 views

Why electrons have less energy than photons with the same wavelength?

I am studying quantum physics and I have a question: what is the physical explanation for electrons having less energy than photons with the same wavelength? Energy of a photon : $E = h ...
2
votes
0answers
29 views

How do the single photon energy and em-signal energy correlate? [duplicate]

If the photon (as a quantum of the electromagnetic field) has no defined(?) amplitude, how does (or where from?) the electromagnetic wave's amplitude appear? The formulation of the question is not ...
2
votes
2answers
49 views

How will a particle with energy less than $V_{\rm min}$ behave?

Consider e.g. the finite square well: $V = -V_o$ between $x=-a$ and $x=a$, $V=0$ elsewhere Now for scattering states, $E$ must be $> 0$. For normalizable bound states, $E$ must be $< 0$ and ...
0
votes
2answers
40 views

Total energy of a quantum gas

I'm dealing with a quantum gas, thought as a system of N non-interacting particles. I would be tempted to say that the total energy of the system equals the sum of the energies of the single ...
6
votes
1answer
121 views

What are the restrictions on the Hamiltonian in QM?

In quantum mechanics, we usually write the Hamiltonian as: $$\hat{H}=\hat{T}+\hat{V}$$ But in classical mechanics, there are several reasons why it would not have this form: We've chosen some ...
1
vote
1answer
117 views

When do we see particles to be in a superposition of energy states?

I have two doubts: Exactly when does this happen? and If we are in a superposition of states (lets say E1 and E2) and the particle absorbs a photon, what will happen? If E3-E1 = hf, will it go to E3? ...
0
votes
0answers
62 views

Questions on electron orbits

I have three questions to ask: Why do electrons (in an atom) specifically move in orbits and not some other type of motion? Where does the energy comes from, for the electron to move at much higher ...
16
votes
3answers
577 views

Why not drop $\hbar\omega/2$ from the quantum harmonic oscillator energy?

Since energy can always be shifted by a constant value without changing anything, why do books on quantum mechanics bother carrying the term $\hbar\omega/2$ around? To be precise, why do we write $H ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Relation between different quantum excitation energy, mass energy and kinetic energy

When a particle enters an excited state, the energy appears in its quantum wavefunction according to $E = h \nu$. Does the $E$ in this equation also include kinetic energy, and rest mass energy? ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

How does a complex wavefunction “hold” energy?

Feynmann Lectures Vol 3 Ch 8 Sec 6 describes how an ammonia molecule can have two definite energy states. If the amplitudes of the base states are $ C_1(t) ...
1
vote
2answers
77 views

What causes different decays?

Nuclei spontaneously decay according to a certain decay rate. There are however different kinds of decay, alpha, beta, gamma... What causes then the nuclei, when they decay, to do so in one way of ...
1
vote
1answer
169 views

Is kinetic energy in QM a state-property or is it distributed?

Suppose we have a quantum mechanical system, which is well described by its wave function in r-representation $\Psi$. We are interested in the properties of an observable, say the kinetic energy $T$. ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

Troubles with the Nucleon Bound Energies

I was reading my quantum mechanics text and I have a doubt. I have the energy levels well defined for the finite square well and the author suddenly compares (I believe) those levels with the levels ...
4
votes
1answer
170 views

Virial theorem and variational method: an exercise (re-edited)

I have a hydrogen atom, knowing that its Hamiltonian has been modified turning the standard potential $$ V_{0}(r) = -\frac{Z}{r} $$ into $$ V(r) = -\frac{g}{r^{\frac{3}{2}}} $$ with $g$ a positive ...
1
vote
1answer
193 views

Energy and time evolution of a particle in a potential well

Hoping this is not a silly and stupid question let me ask for help in this problem. I have a particle in an infinite square well (the box is from 0 to a), in the state described by the function ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

Which is more energy efficient: optical demagnetization or heating beyond $T_c$,

What is considered more energy efficient? Current research show that the amount of energy used for powering a laser to demagnetize a material is quite small. However, the demagnetization is very ...
0
votes
1answer
200 views

Integers, Energy levels, and wavenumbers for a particle in a 2D box

(This question is not about coding) I have built a little code in Python that allows the user to plot the energy vs the wave number of particle in a 2D box, depending on what values for the integers ...
0
votes
5answers
706 views

Do electrons collapse into nucleus, if electrons in the atom are constantly excited?

From the Bohr's atomic model, it is clear that electron can have only certain definite energy levels. When the electron is present as close to the nucleus as possible, the atom has the minimum ...
9
votes
3answers
221 views

Does quantum collapse involve a loss of information? Does it require energy as suggested by the Landauer Limit?

I read in the context of quantum computing or of the minimal energy required for computation that there has to be a minimum possible amount of energy required to change one bit of information, called ...
3
votes
1answer
191 views

Estimating minimum energy with uncertainty principle

I'm currently trying to solve a problem that involves estimating the minimum energy of a particle in the potential: $$ V(x) = \frac{-V_0a}{|{x}|} $$ I'm quite confused about how to handle the ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Calculating the stability/invertibility of energy maps by multivariate time series model

You have the following energy maps for 14 different structures so about 4-5 pixels for one unit. The color density represents energy. I am thinking that you can set multivariate time series models ...
0
votes
2answers
160 views

Do any other particles get excited(or absorb energy) by photons like electrons?

Electrons get excited to different energy levels when photons of specific frequencies fall on them.But, is there other particles which absorb the energy of the photons?
0
votes
1answer
384 views

How to derive or justify the expressions of momentum operator and energy operator?

It has been noted here$\! { \, }^{\text(1, 2)}$, for instance, that $$\mathbf{F} = \frac{d}{dt}\!\!\biggl[ \, \mathbf{p} \, \biggr]$$ is true in all contexts. Likewise, in notable contexts it is ...
0
votes
0answers
61 views

Energy required to demagnetize a soft iron?

How much energy is required to demagnetize a soft iron ferromagnetic material, that has a very low coercive force And a small hysteresis area? Also, would it be possible to demagnetize that same ...
0
votes
1answer
217 views

Hamiltonian operator apply to a wavefunction

When a Hamiltonian operator apply to a wavefunction, how could we write the hamiltonian as, $$H \psi = (E_n-\hbar \omega_0) \psi \ \ ? $$ Is this because $E_n= H+ \hbar \omega_0$? where ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

Wave Function of Particle in Nuclear Reaction

I was thinking and came up with the question of what happens to the wave function of a particle that decays into energy, say a neutron in a nuclear reaction. I know that conservation of probability ...
0
votes
3answers
753 views

Simple harmonic oscillator: zero point energy?

Today we had a lecture on the simple harmonic oscillator and its quantum mechanical treatment. My teacher derived the equation for it and finally concluded it has some zero point energy. My ...
1
vote
3answers
412 views

What is the energy of a standing EM wave? Is it probabilistic?

In a cavity, the standing wave will constructively interfere with itself, so its energy gets higher while the oscillator is still vibrating. Since the vibration time is not a constant value, and ...
6
votes
2answers
367 views

“Correlation energy” using the pair correlation function

In this paper on the Quantum Hall effect the authors refer to something called the correlation energy of electrons. It is defined at the top of page 5 as $E=\frac{n}{2}\int (g(r)-1)V(r)dA\ ,$ where ...