0
votes
2answers
54 views

If 'pure energy' is photons, and energy is conserved, how can matter and antimatter (electrons and positrons) annihilate into photons and vice-versa? [duplicate]

The first law of thermodynamics says energy cannot be created or destroyed. But we can collide photons to form electrons and positrons. Does this means that law does not apply in these microscopic ...
-1
votes
1answer
57 views

Is it feasible to transfer energy from power stations to communities via photons instead of electrons?

Electrical wires are relatively inefficient in transferring energy--especially when the place of production is quite far from communities. Would it be possible to transfer that energy via photons? I ...
0
votes
2answers
85 views

Change in Wavelength of a Photon Relation to Energy (specifically Compton Effect)

Given a photon dropping from $\lambda_1$ to $\lambda_2$, its energy will drop from $\frac{hc}{(\lambda_1)}$ to $\frac{hc}{(\lambda_2)}$. However, I was wondering if there is any significance in the ...
5
votes
4answers
227 views

A question abou $E=pc$ for massless particles

Since photon has no (rest)mass and $$E^2=(pc)^2+(mc^2)^2$$ we derive that $E=pc$ for particle with no (rest)mass. However, if we transform the non-relativistic formula for kinetic energy ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Light Apparent Brightness

Let's say I have a triangular light source. From that light source I want to calculate a pyramidal frustum (tetrahedron with no apex). How would I calculate the maximum bottom area where light would ...
3
votes
1answer
153 views

Energy of an EM wave compared to energy of a photon

Several posts on this forum ask the question about the role of amplitude in calculating the energy of an Em wave. This struck me as odd since I learned that E=hv. There is no amplitude in the Planck ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Difference between $K_{\alpha}$, $K_{\beta}$ and binding energies

I'm having a small question regarding $K_{\alpha}$ and $K_{\beta}$ emissions. If I'm not mistaken this happens when there is a transition from the L shell to the K shell (Depending on the orbital), ...
1
vote
2answers
560 views

Collision between a photon and an electron

Looking through this AP Physics question, I was struck by how the 'collision' between a photon and electron looks so much like a macroscopic collision. Is this even physically possible? Look at the ...
34
votes
5answers
4k views

Why doesn't light kill me?

I was attending my philosophy class and in the middle of student presentations, I found myself mentally wondering off and thinking about light. After a few minutes of trying to piece together how the ...
1
vote
2answers
71 views

Hurdles in creating (close to) infinite images [duplicate]

Let's put an object (hypothetical superman) inside a "well sealed" box containing only mirrors. Is it possible to create number of images that will be close to infinity, assuming that resolution of ...
1
vote
4answers
608 views

Where do photons get their energy from?

If energy required to accelerate a particle to the speed of light is infinite then where do they get it from? But first if photon's are massless, then why do they collide to some other thing and get ...
1
vote
1answer
214 views

Specific electron energy gap values $E_{i+1}-E_i$ vs. photons with arbitrary energy $\hbar \omega$

The energy levels of electrons in an atom are quantized $E_i$. A photon of a specific momentum $\vec p$ and energy $$\omega=(E_{i+1}-E_i)/\hbar$$ hits an atom and gets absorbed. Okay now say the ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

Do photons lose energy while travelling through space? Or why are planets closer to the sun warmer?

My train of thought was the following: The Earth orbiting the Sun is at times 5 million kilometers closer to it than others, but this is almost irrelevant to the seasons. Instead, the temperature ...
16
votes
3answers
3k views

Amplitude of an electromagnetic wave containing a single photon

Given a light pulse in vacuum containing a single photon with an energy $E=h\nu$, what is the peak value of the electric / magnetic field?
6
votes
2answers
653 views

Photon energy - momentum in matter

$E = h\nu$ and $P = h\nu/c$ in vacuum. If a photon enters water, it's frequency $\nu$ doesn't change. What are its energy and momentum : $h\nu$ ? and $h\nu/c$ ? Since part of it's energy and momentum ...
3
votes
1answer
687 views

What is the difference between infrared heat and “regular” heat?

In Feynman's terms temperature is the speed at which atoms are 'jiggling'. Now, let's suppose I've just eaten a sizable dinner, and my body temperature just got a tad up. Am I emitting more photons in ...
7
votes
2answers
623 views

Have red shifted photons lost energy and where did it go?

I think the title says it. Did expansion of the universe steal the energy somehow?
1
vote
1answer
129 views

Will a photon emitted from something moving quickly have a shorter wavelength?

If a photon is emitted from a light source moving at any speed, the photon will nonetheless always move at c (assuming it is emitted in a vacuum.) If the speed of a photon's emitter cannot influence ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Conservation of energy and Doppler effect?

From what I understand, the frequency of light coming from the source moving towards an observer increases. From $ E=hv $ , this implies increase in energy of photon. What really is confusing, is ...
1
vote
1answer
142 views

The energy carried from one winding of a transformer to another, in quantum terms

I have read in wikipedia this statement "The energy carried from one winding of a transformer to another, in quantum terms is carried by virtual photons, not real photons" (wikipedia src: virtual ...
3
votes
1answer
253 views

If 100% of the energy from the sun is reflected back into space

100% of the energy from the sun is reflected back into space, it's just shifted from a low-entropy state to a high-entropy state, and from a high frequency (ultraviolet) to a low frequency (infrared). ...
5
votes
3answers
667 views

Kinetic Energy vs. Potential energy with regards to creating particles

So I know that when you collide particles with high enough kinetic energy, (kinetic energy = at least the rest mass of the particles you are making), you get particles. How come potential energy ...
2
votes
0answers
288 views

Maxwell's Demon - laser cooling

There’s an interesting article on Scientific American that tells how to cool individual atoms to within a very tiny fraction of Absolute Zero. It uses two laser beams acting on a very cold rarified ...
9
votes
2answers
1k views

Does $E = mc^2$ apply to photons?

Photons are massless, but if $m = 0$ and $E = mc^2$ then $E = 0c^2 = 0$. This would say that photons have no energy, which is not true. However, given the formula $E = ℎf$, a photon does have energy ...
-2
votes
3answers
762 views

Anti-laser: How sure we are that energy is transported?

Reading this PE question can-we-transport-energy-over-infinite-distances-through-vacuum-using-light, a related question arises naturally: Is energy transported (by light)? -- (I did believed in this ...
34
votes
8answers
25k views

If photons have no mass, how can they have momentum?

As an explanation of why a large gravitational field (such as a black hole) can bend light, I have heard that light has momentum. This is given as a solution to the problem of only massive objects ...
22
votes
5answers
3k views

Do photons gain mass when they travel through glass?

Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that photons slow down when travelling through glass. Does this mean they gain mass? Otherwise, what happens to extra kinetic energy? I understand now ...