Electrostatics is concerned with the electrical fields and scalar potentials of stationary electrical charges and charge distributions. Use this for questions about electromagnetic situations in which currents and magnetic fields are absent, otherwise use [tag:electromagnetism] and/or [tag:magnetic-...

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161 views

Realistic vs Idealistic capacitance

I am doing an investigation into the differences of calculating capacitance using the well know formula for an idealistic parallel plate capacitor, based on the assumption of a uniformly distributed ...
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1answer
607 views

Frank-Hertz experiment setup

The usual schematic representing the setup of Frank-Hertz experiment is the following: However, sometimes, you can see a bit different schematic: My question is: what function does $V_{G_1K}$ ...
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1answer
466 views

what is the electric field intensity inside a charged metallic shell if there is a point charge inside the shell?

What I know so far: - Charges (electrons) inside a conductor will repel (Coulomb's law). - The charges will experience repulsion which results in maximum separation distances between the charges. - ...
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1answer
334 views

Method of images tutorial?

I'm having an exam in Electrodynamics soon. I think I have most of it under control, but the method of images I'm not quite sure about. There is not much in my book about, so I was thinking some of ...
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3answers
2k views

Maxwell Stress Tensor in the absence of a magnetic field

I'm having some trouble calculating the stress tensor in the case of a static electric field without a magnetic field. Following the derivation on Wikipedia, Start with Lorentz force: $$\mathbf{F} = ...
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1answer
760 views

Electric Field due to a charged sphere

Suppose we have a spherical surface with a surface charge density varying as $cos(\theta)$. Apparently one can find the electric field both outside and inside such a spherical surface by superposing ...
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1answer
1k views

Calculating the electric relative permittivity of fluid or medium?

I'm unsure of how to calculate the permittivity of a fluid. Permittivity differs from one fluid to another: $$\varepsilon=\varepsilon_r\varepsilon_0$$ Since it is an electrical property combined ...
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3answers
820 views

Electrostatic notion of voltage as it applies to circuits

I have a question that's been bothering me about electric fields, voltage, and circuit analysis. Initially, I came to understand voltage as it was taught in the context of electrostatics - through ...
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1answer
478 views

Why do hydrogen atoms attract?

That is, why is the potential energy with the orbitals overlapping less than with the Hydrogen atoms 'independent'. Similarly, why is a noble gas configuration stabler than if an electron were to be ...
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1answer
319 views

What force is acting on the charge in the dielectric?

For example I have a dielectric solid with a small charged ball in it. And I have external electric field $E$. So what force is acting on this ball? The field in dielectric is $\frac{E}{\epsilon}$, ...
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47 views

Is it true that it is a misconception that the Van de Graaf generator works with the Faraday's ice pail principle

I found some interesting papers which claim that it is a misconception that the charge accumulation on the top is due to the Faraday's ice pail principle but rather just as in Volta's condensing ...
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2answers
55 views

Electric field inside a material

I was thinking about the polarisation, and how the electric field behaves inside the material of permittivity greater than one. I think to have understood what happens to D and P, but is not clear ...
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1answer
61 views

Confusion regarding gauss law

Gauss law states that flux due to net electric field on a Gaussian surface is charge enclosed/permittivity. Lets take a spherical Gaussian surface with +q charge at centre. We can simply calculate the ...
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48 views

Why is the susceptibility $\chi(t)$ real?

So my question is quite simple I suppose, and perhaps trivial. It is known that the frequency domain susceptbility $\chi(\omega)$ is complex, and that the two parts can be related with the Kramers-...
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3answers
123 views

What does the Dirac delta function physically do while deriving Gauss Law form Coulomb's law?

While doing this derivation, the the source coordinates are mentioned as "$s$" and the coordinate of the point at which field is to be calculated is mentioned as "$r$". Kindly follow this Wikipedia ...
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0answers
107 views

Electric field due to charged disc, on the plane of the disc [closed]

A standard problem in finding the field is that of a uniformly charged disc, on its axis, but for this problem I'm supposed to find the potential and the field on the edge of the disc, i.e. in the ...
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3answers
311 views

Difference between $E$ field configuration, sheet of charge: infinite sheet of charge, conducting vs. non-conducting

This is a very easy question, but I often confused myself. Perhaps someone could explain this concept again: A non-conducting infinite sheet of charge has the electric field configuration \begin{...
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31 views

Scale-covariant decomposition of capacitance

I'm wondering if there is any good insight of how to evaluate a given capacitive geometry in such a way that it would be expressed as a function that depends only on two components: as a geometric ...
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1answer
129 views

Interpretation of a term in the Maxwell stress tensor

With no magnetism, the $xx$ component of the Maxwell stress tensor $T$ is $$T_{xx} = \frac{1}{2}(E_x^2 - E_y^2 - E_z^2)$$ I can see why there should be a $+E_x^2$ term, but intuitively I don't see why ...
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38 views

Why charge density is higher in the sharp edges of conductor? [duplicate]

If we have a conductor which is in electrostatic equilibrium, then the charge distribution over this surface $\sigma$ is greatest at the sharp edges of that surface. Why is this the case? It is ...
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2answers
858 views

Why can't charge be in a stable equilibrium in electrostatic field?

I am reading Feynman's Lectures volume_II where he discussed the impossibility of the presence of stable equilibrium in an electrostatic field. There are no points of stable equilibrium in any ...
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2answers
3k views

Electric potential inside a conductor

I just began studying electrostatics in university, and I didn't understand completely why the electric potential due to a conducting sphere is $$ V(\vec{r})=\begin{cases} \dfrac{1}{4\pi\...
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0answers
76 views

What would be the charge distribution in a Klein bottle?

We know that for any conductor the charge lies on the outer surface at electrostatic equilibrium. What would happen if a Klein bottle is made up of a conductor and a charge is placed on it?
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88 views

What are the parameters for Pauli's repulsion pseudo-force?

I have found the following formula for the repulsion potential due to the overlap of the electron clouds arising from Pauli's exclusion principle: $$V = A\exp(-r/\phi)$$ where r is the distance ...
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1answer
146 views

Electricity from lightning

According to the internet, a lightning strike contains about 5 billion joules or 5 GJ. How was this calculated? Another thing: Once the lightning strike a metal grounded rod, a current will flow. ...
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1answer
155 views

Is the system of equations of electrostatics underdetermined or overdetermined? [duplicate]

The following equations are equations of electrostatics: $$\nabla \times \vec E=0$$ $$\nabla\cdot\vec E=\dfrac{\rho}{\epsilon_0}.$$ These are 4 independent equations, while $\vec E$ has only 3 ...
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4answers
750 views

Does an object's movement affect the likelihood of being struck by lightning?

Does the state of whether an object if moving or stationary affect the likelihood of it being struck by lightning? I suppose some things that could be considered would be: Whether the movement ...
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126 views

Electrodynamics and induced EMF question [closed]

A very long straight wire carries a current I. A plane rectangular coil of high resistance, with sides of length $a$ and $b$, is coplanar with the wire. One of the sides of length $a$ is parallel to ...
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289 views

How to set up Schrodinger's equation for an electron (as a charge distribution) under its own electrostatic field

After reading about the hydrogen atom and understanding how Schrodinger's equation explains most part of the atomic spectrum of an hydrogen atom, and also came to know that, it explains most of the ...
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0answers
68 views

Modeling the formation of a stellar system and matter accretion

I am trying to figure out what do I need to know to properly simulate the creation of a solar system from a particle cloud with random distribution of hydrogen atoms. Being more of a programming ...
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0answers
50 views

Nature of electricity [duplicate]

Suppose a lightning strikes and there is an iron rod and a coconut tree. How does the electricity know that rod is the least resistant path before hand.
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1answer
683 views

Boundary conditions in Electrostatics

If I have a grounded conducting material, then I know that $\phi=0$ inside this material, no matter what the electric configuration in the surrounding will be. Now I have a conducting material that ...
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2answers
876 views

Electrostatics:Basic question on electric current

I've got two questions for you. Electric current is the flow of electrons across a conductor.Why has it always got to do with electrons and not with protons? (I know neutrons are not eligible for ...
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3answers
560 views

Why capacitance is given as constant value in Farads, and not as max charge in Coulombs?

The equation for capacitance is $Q=CV$ or $V={1\over C}Q$. I don't understand what is the physical meaning of this "$C$": Does the charge in a system changes linearly with voltage under all ...
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4answers
2k views

Electric Field due to a disk of charge. (Problem in derivation)

This might be a really silly question, but I don't understand it. In finding the electric field due to a thin disk of charge, we use the known result of the field due to a ring of charge and then ...
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4answers
547 views

Is Gauss' law valid for time-dependent electric fields?

The Maxwell's equation $\boldsymbol{\nabla}\cdot \textbf{E}(\textbf{r})=\frac{\rho(\textbf{r})}{\epsilon_0}$ is derived from the Gauss law in electrostatics (which is in turn derived from Coulomb's ...
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4answers
11k views

Why are there dust particles on TV screens?

My professor gave us the following reason: The screen is positively charged. When dust particles fly near it, the positive charges in the screen induce a charge in the dust particle, pulling the ...
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2answers
3k views

Highest man-made voltage

What was the highest voltage achieved and was it produced by electrostatic means or just some transformers and multipliers? What are the limitations when it comes to producing voltage using ...
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2answers
7k views

Is a charged particle at rest affected by magnetic field?

It is known that particles such as electrons and protons bear electric charge, but not a magnetic charge. When these particles are at rest, are they somehow affected by magnetic field? The similar ...
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4answers
624 views

Gauss' law - changes in the magnitude of E field inside the closed surface

Gauss's law says that the flux through a closed surface which contains neither a sink nor a source will be zero. It's quite clear that all field lines will have to exit somehow, but the strength of ...
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3answers
179 views

Laplacian of 1/r satisfies laplacian equation?

We know that $$ \nabla^2 \left( \frac{1}{r} \right) = -4 \pi \delta(r) \tag{1}$$ and that the general solution to the laplace equation $\nabla^2\Psi = 0$ may be expanded as $$\Psi=\sum_l \left(A_lr^l+...
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1answer
277 views

How to approximate trajectories and movement of two oppositely charged particles?

Imagine a single, stationary charged atomic ion, say a Lithium anion or cation (Li+ or Li-). Now imagine another a single free, oppositely charged particle--perhaps an electron or Hydrogen ion (H+)--...
2
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1answer
1k views

Is there a difference between Electric and Electrostatic Field?

Is there a difference between Electric and Electrostatic Field? All I know is that they both represented with same law suppose we have a Charge placed at the Origin: $$E=\frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0}\...
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3answers
3k views

Can we have negative Electrostatic potential

What does it mean to have a negative electric potential? not talking about potential difference or voltage.
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3answers
6k views

Why the electric potential of earth is zero?

For a localized charge distribution the potential is set to zero far away from the charge distribution (at infinity) Now, when grounding a conductor, i.e. connecting it to Earth, it is said that we ...
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3answers
173 views

How come we talk about gravitational potential energy and not gravitational potential?

With regards to gravity the equation learned is $$U=-\frac{GMm}{r}$$ And the relationship to force is $$F=-\frac{dU}{dr}$$ In electrostatics we instead talk about electric field and electric ...
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2answers
1k views

Is there really no meaning in potential energy and potential?

I have been told all my physics life that potential energy between two mass/charge has no meaning and only their difference has meaning. The same goes for electric potential, only the difference ...
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421 views

Maximum limit of charging a capacitor

We say that we can charge a capacitor in proportion to the potential difference we apply across its plates and the maximum potential difference depends on the dielectric strength of the medium. Now ...
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1answer
119 views

Coulomb's law with an $r^3$, not $r^2$, in the denominator [duplicate]

I am reading an older physics book that my professor gave me. It is going over Coulomb's law and Gauss' theorem. However, the book gives both equations with an $r^3$, not $r^2$, in the denominator. ...
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5answers
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If the electrostatic potential is zero, why doesn't the electric field have to be zero?

I thought the relation between the electrostatic field $\vec E$ and the electrostatic potential $V$ is as follows: $$\vec E = - \nabla V$$ Thus, when $V$ is zero, $\vec E$ is also zero.