Electrostatics is concerned with the field and potential of stationary electrical charges and electric charge distributions. Problems are this type are almost exclusively concerned with mathematics of geometries using the inverse-square law.

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Electric field. Linear charge density [closed]

I was wondering if anyone could help me out in this exercise I've been struggling to solve. A straight, nonconducting plastic wire $ 8.50 cm $ long carries a charge density of 175 $ nC/m$ ...
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5answers
3k views

How can I prevent my son building up static on his trampoline?

Whenever my three year old son plays on his trampoline, it doesn't take very long for him to start building up a significant amount of static electricity. His hair stands on end (which is quite ...
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1answer
61 views

Why does cloud-ground lightning occur so much less frequently over ocean?

I was talking with an acquaintance about lightning, and we came up with opposite theories and predictions for the frequency of lightning over ocean. My theory is that since seawater is a fluid ...
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2answers
237 views

What happened to potential energy?

I was learning how charge can be virtue of a body's potential energy.Meanwhile,I was hung by this question. [gravitational and other forces except coulombic,are assumed to be not acting on the ...
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1answer
353 views

The total energy of an electrostatic system

My problem is from Griffiths Introduction to Electrodynamics, Fourth Edition, p.112 Problem 2.60 (not homework): A point charge $q$ is at the center of an uncharged spherical conducting shell, ...
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2answers
269 views

Does a conductor of total charge zero placed in a uniform external electric field experience net force?

The question I have in mind is: If we place a conductor (arbitrary shape) of total charge zero in a uniform external electric field $\textbf{E}_0$, does it experience any net force? Why (not)? Now I ...
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1answer
84 views

Does an electric field create a pH gradient?

Since pH is a measure of the effective concentration of $\mathrm{H}^+$ ions a solution, I expect that an electric field applied to a solution will create a pH gradient. The higher concentration of ...
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1answer
50 views

Does zero change in magnetic flux always imply zero emf induced?

If you have a uniform B field, with a finite piece of wire inside it. Assuming the B field spans all space and the wire cannot leave the field. Are you able to create an emf by moving the wire ? I ...
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2answers
196 views

Will there be any force of attraction or repulsion between an electrified body and a non-electrified body?

Up to my knowledge an electrified (charged) body can attract a non-electrified (neutral) body. I thought this because, when we bring a charged (suppose negatively charged) body near a neutral one. ...
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26 views

Capacitance of an arbitrary electrode configuration

I have to find the capacitance of a circuit element in three dimensions. I have the potential and charge in this cross sectional slice calculated using numerical methods. Does this value of ...
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1answer
45 views

which induced current produce due to magnetic field?

please i want to ask when induced current produced by changing magnetic field according to faraday's law is this current DC or AC current ?
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1answer
172 views

how can electromagnetic waves reach a cell phone in faraday cage?

is there any way to make electromagnetic waves reach a cell phone in faraday cage although conductor surround cell phone everywhere , can we pass current through conductor to make charges move as a ...
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1answer
38 views

When an induced charge (ie polarization) takes place, what is the velocity of the process? Is it dependent upon the permittivity?

In a classic demonstration of inducing a charge on a dielectric, the latter is exposed to an external field. There is a resulting charge separation in the dielectric. What is the velocity of ...
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152 views

How charge distribution takes place when a battery is connected to a conductor?

When one terminal of a battery say of 1.5 volt connected to a short length wire, few electrons get transferred from battery terminal to the wire raising the potential of the wire also to 1.5 volt. We ...
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2answers
64 views

Coefficients of capitance

In my syllabus about electromagnetism, they introduce the coefficients of capacitance by stating that, if we have $n$ conductors enclosed by linear dielectrics, then we can write 'because of ...
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1answer
336 views

Poisson's equation with a point charge source [closed]

How do you derive the solution to Poisson's equation with a point charge source? Without using Coulomb's law or the electric field! To be more explicit, we have a point charge at $(0,0)$ of charge $q$ ...
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1answer
221 views

Coulomb potential

It is known that the Coulomb potential can be obtained by Fourier transform of the propagator from E&M. Is this because one of Maxwell's equations have the form $\nabla \cdot \mathbf{E}=\rho$?
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3answers
952 views

Electricity & Magnetism - Is an electric field infinite?

The inverse square law for an electric field is: $$ E = \frac{Q}{4\pi\varepsilon_{0}r^2} $$ Here: $$\frac{Q}{\varepsilon_{0}}$$ is the source strength of the charge. It is the point charge divided ...
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4answers
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In electrostatics, why the conductor is an equipotential surface?

Since the electric field inside a conductor is zero that means the potential is constant inside a conductor, which means the "inside" of a conductor is an equipotential region. Why books conclude ...
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1answer
591 views

Calculating the electric relative permittivity of fluid or medium?

I'm unsure of how to calculate the permittivity of a fluid. Permittivity differs from one fluid to another: $$\varepsilon=\varepsilon_r\varepsilon_0$$ Since it is an electrical property combined ...
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1answer
124 views

Local nature of a surface charge density

Boundary S of a cavity in a very large (perfect) conductor is a connected compact (smooth) surface. A positive point charge +q is placed inside this cavity. From Gauss' law we know that the total ...
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1answer
99 views

Electrical potential difference?

What is the electrical potential difference and why we have to talk about a difference and not about the electrical potential itself? What is the electrical potential difference in practical terms ...
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1answer
97 views

How do aspherical gravitational monopoles look like?

I was recently pointed by laboussoleestmonpays to a beautiful paper from some time ago, Aspherical gravitational monopoles. Alain Connes, Thibault Damour and Pierre Fayet. Nucl. Phys. B 490 no. ...
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3answers
147 views

Clarity in Electric field Definition?

The electric field at a point is defined as q/$r^2$. How does this definition take the nature of source and test charge into consideration. If I bring any positive/negative charge around the source ...
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1answer
202 views

Why does Hauksbee's electrostatic machine produce light?

I'm reading on the history of the discovery of electricity and the electron, and I've went from reading about Rutherford's gold leaf experiment all the way back to Francis Hauksbee's spinning glass ...
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110 views

Solve a problem without using separation of variables

There's an additional exercise from Introduction to Electrodynamics by Griffith. Problem 4.34 A point dipole p is imbedded at the center of a sphere of linear dielectric material (with radius $R$ ...
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1answer
73 views

Field of a parallel plate capacitor

Pretty much in all the diagrams I have seen the electric field of the parallel plates is depicted as in this image The field lines seems to start bending only after leaving the periphery of the ...
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70 views

Do glass beads show any piezoelectric property?

Do glass beads show any piezoelectric property? Since glass beads is mostly made out of SiO2 which is piezoelectric, will it show any piezoelectric property. Thanks. If anything wrong with my ...
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1answer
344 views

Boundary condition for a floating electrostatic potential

I have a (probably) simple question regarding boundary conditions. In electrostatic simulations, the relevant Maxwell equation is $\nabla \cdot \mathbf{D}=\rho$ where $\mathbf{E}=-\nabla V$, and ...
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2answers
91 views

How long does it take for a metal to reach equilibrium?

I wonder if there is a measure of how long a piece of metal takes to reach electrostatic equilibrium. Does it depend on piece's size? Does it depend on the amount of imbalance? Lots of websites and ...
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2answers
71 views

Discrete approximation of charge density

Given the electric potential $\Phi(r)$ and the Poisson's equation: $$ \nabla^2 \Phi(r) = - 4\pi \rho(r)$$ Consider the 2-dimensional case and let's say that I want to discretize this using a square ...
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788 views

Is Newton's universal gravitational constant the inverse of permittivity of mass in vacuum?

Is it possible to consider Newton's universal gravitational constant, $G$, as inverse of vacuum permittivity of mass? $$\epsilon_m=\frac {1}{4\pi G}$$ if so, then vacuum permeability of mass will ...
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3answers
185 views

Electric flux for a rectangular surface? [closed]

I have the following homework problem: A line of charge $\lambda$ is located on the z-axis. Determine the electric flux for a rectangular surface with corners at coordinates: $(0, R, 0)$, ...
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0answers
70 views

Electrodynamics and induced EMF question [closed]

A very long straight wire carries a current I. A plane rectangular coil of high resistance, with sides of length $a$ and $b$, is coplanar with the wire. One of the sides of length $a$ is parallel ...
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131 views

Is there a way I can prevent static electricty buildup from shocking me? [duplicate]

I work at a warehouse where we re-pack plastic sheets. Every single day I get shocked when I touch the aluminum foil and even the plastic sheets. What are some useful tips to prevent this from ...
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2answers
378 views

Meaning of boundary condition for steady current density?

Although I understand the derivation of boundary condition in case of steady electric current but I did not understand, that the electric field which is in direction of $J$ current density that is ...
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4answers
534 views

Capacitance of two almost-touching hemispheres

This capacitor is composed of two half spherical shelled conductors both with radius $r$. There is a very small space between the two parts seeing to that no charge will exchange between them. So ...
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4answers
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Is an electron/proton gun possible?

In the 1944 SF story “Off the Beam” by George O. Smith, an electron gun is constructed along the length of a spaceship. In order to avoid being constrained by a net charge imbalance, it is built to ...
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1answer
141 views

Why is electric flux through any closed surface $q/\epsilon_0$?

Why is electric flux through any closed surface $q/\epsilon_0$? In schools we are only taught of its simplest case, i.e. flux through a sphere with charge centered at origin. And then it is ...
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2answers
186 views

Why do clouds appear black?

I have noticed clouds appearing black during rain. But I don't know what makes clouds to acquire that colour. This phenomenon doesn't appear every rainfall. There has to be distinction to white ...
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2answers
185 views

Alternative derivation for the capacitor energy equation [closed]

I hope this is the right place for this kind of post. A friend is trying to derive the equation for the energy stored in a capacitor by analysing the change in potential on one plate when the ...
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1answer
135 views

Is there any metal having the properties of rubber? [closed]

I have seen tires of vehicles to be made of rubber with air filled tube inside.Why can't we have whole tire to be made of rubber? I hope there would be some use of the air filled tube.Then What is ...
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1answer
743 views

Potential energy of the dipole-dipole interaction for two parallel dipole moments

I am looking for an equation that gives me the potential energy of the interaction between two parallel dipoles.
4
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1answer
113 views

Integrating Radial Vector Fields

Given a integral $$\int_vd^3{r} \;\vec{r}\;\rho(r)$$ and How do you convert it to spherical coordinate system, noting that $\rho(r)$ is indeed as it is without vector, i.e. it is spherically symmetric ...
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1answer
108 views

is it possible to have magnetic flux density B not in the same direction of magnetic field intensity H?

it is said that direction of magnetic flux density B in the same direction of magnetic field intensity H for isotropic media so what is isotropic media and is it possible to have B not in the same ...
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2answers
47 views

Finding out the potential [closed]

According to me, if we want to find out the potential the the equation will be, $$dV = \int \frac{dQ}{4 \pi \epsilon_0 x}$$. But the answer is given is on the basis of $$dV = \int \frac{dQ}{4 ...
2
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2answers
577 views

When can a surface charge density exist?

In my syllabus about electromagnetism, they state: "This surface charge density will not always be present, e.g. when considering two non-conducting dielectrics such surface charge density remains ...
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1answer
506 views

Linear charge density, surface charge density and volume charge density

What is the difference among: linear charge density, surface charge density, and volume charge density?
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Can protons in the nucleus of an atom be aligned by electromagnetic fields?

Can protons in the nucleus of an atom be aligned by electromagnetic fields? If so can it be done around $-135°C$ zero?
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Why does the area of the plates affect the capacitance?

Why does the area of the plates affect the capacitance? Lets say I have a parallel plate capacitor with a charge of 10C and a potential difference of 5V. By the definition $C=Q/V$, the capacitance is ...