Electrostatics is concerned with the electrical fields and scalar potentials of stationary electrical charges and charge distributions. Use this for questions about electromagnetic situations in which currents and magnetic fields are absent, otherwise use [tag:electromagnetism] and/or ...

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2answers
157 views

What are the advantages of multipole expansion of potentials?

When I see the equations of multipolar expansions they "look" to me harder than the original expressions. For example: Multipole expansion - spherical form, in Wikipedia I bet that this is not ...
2
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0answers
64 views

Electric field of a Uniformly charged sphere with a cavity [closed]

I have the following question: Consider a sphere of radius $R$, uniformly charged with a volume density $\rho$. The sphere has a spherical hole of radius $R/4$ at a distance $R/2$ from the ...
1
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0answers
29 views

Induced charges, electric potential

Consider a solid spherical conductor with charge Q on it, a charge q is placed at a distance r from the centre of sphere. Find the electric potential at the centre of sphere due to induced charges on ...
0
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0answers
14 views

Angular current in torus

I'm trying to find the magnetic field due to a torus anywhere in space. I'm approximating it as a circular current loop. What I'm having a hard time with is the current in the theta direction, that ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

Electrostatic induction, induced charges

Is it true that If a conducting object is not grounded, the nearby charge will induce equal and opposite charges in the conducting object? It is mentioned in Wikipedia(electrostatic induction) but it ...
0
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3answers
44 views

How much energy does an electron have when it is situated right next to a negative point charge?

The formula for potential energy regarding point charges is $E=kQq/r$. If $r=0$, then will the energy be approaching infinity? But what about an electron in a parallel-plates situation where it is ...
0
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1answer
59 views

Laser-induced electrical discharge

Attracting lightning with an ion beam has been done in a lab but how strong of a laser is needed to reach the clouds to redirect the lightning bolt?
0
votes
1answer
29 views

How to find the polarization of a dielectric sphere with charged shell surrounding it?

A shell with negligible thickness has a given charge density as a function of theta, and is filled with a dielectric material with a given electric susceptibility. Using lovely legendre polynomials ...
1
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0answers
72 views

Am I too young? [closed]

I am only 14 years old but I dream of being a physicist what we learn in school seems very simple for me I am a freshmen and I learn Igsce syllabus and I don't seem to find it hard at all , but i am ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Why does grounding yourself prevent feeling a static shock?

Sometimes I get static electric shocks when I touch certain metallic objects. However, I seem to be able to prevent this by grounding myself by first touching that object with a small piece of metal, ...
0
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0answers
19 views

Analogy of Faraday Cage?

Can we think that an ideal conductor is a friction less space for electrons since under influence of electric field they create an exactly opposing field and produce shielding effect ?If so then how ...
3
votes
4answers
310 views

Electric field in a conductor

Is it always true that the electric field in a conductor is zero? What would happen if I put a very big charge inside an ungrounded hollow conducting sphere like this image? The charges inside the ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

The discontinuity of Electric Field

''electric field always undergoes a discontinuity when you cross a surface charge $\sigma$'' GRIFFITHS In the derivation; Suppose we draw a wafer-thin Gaussian Pillbox, extended just barely over the ...
0
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0answers
25 views

Extreme charge density in thin capacitor plates

Suppose we made a 1 square meter parallel plate capacitor from two sheets of graphene separated by a very strong dielectric of arbitrary thickness. Then we charge the capacitor just short of the ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

When I connect two charged capacitors side by side, what will be the voltage across them?

Say, I have two charged capacitors, one 3mF and one 2mF. The voltage across them are 20V and 30V respectively. Now if I connect the two capacitors side by side as shown below, what will be the voltage ...
2
votes
2answers
54 views

Are charges always uniformly distributed on conductors?

As the title says. For example, if I take a fat metal wire with non-negligible thickness, and then wind it into a spiral, but such that none of the parts touch one another (there are no topological ...
4
votes
4answers
4k views

How does positive charge spread out in conductors?

I know that when there are excess positive charges in a conductor, for example, a metal sphere, the positive charges will spread out over its surface. However, I am confused about how this excess ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Uniformly charged disk

A uniformly charged disk is an isolant or a conductor? Or could it be both of them? I only know its radius and its surface charge density, which is uniform throughout the disk.
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Earth as a conductor

In a lightning rod or other safety devices, charge is directed towards the earth. How the surface of the earth can be used as a conducting path despite being composed of material that is not a good ...
0
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2answers
38 views

Why Electrostatic field has a continuous curve?

An electrostatic field line is a continuous curve. That is, a field line cannot have sudden breaks. Why not ?
0
votes
1answer
270 views

Electrons drift velocity and capacitors

My friend said this to me and just want to make sure this is right " when we connect the a battery to a LED and the 2 poles are connected, electrons flow from the (-) to the (+) but with very low ...
12
votes
3answers
6k views

Coulomb force in SI and cgs

Coulomb force in SI is $ F = \frac{Q1*Q2}{4\pi\varepsilon R^{2}} $ while in CGS $ F = \frac{Q1*Q2}{R^{2}} $ why is it? I mean doesn't it any make difference in dimension? since $ \varepsilon $ ...
1
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0answers
22 views

Azimuthally Symmetric Potential for a Spherical Conductor

I am trying to solve problem 2-13 from my textbook "Principles of Electrodynamics" (see image below). I believe that I should be solving the potential as $ \varphi(r,\theta) = \sum_{n=0}^\infty ...
0
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0answers
39 views

Potential of ring of charge and a conducting sphere

My goal is to find an expression for the expression of the force on a conducting sphere due to a circular ring of total charge $Q.$ The sphere has radius $a,$ and it is placed along the axis of the ...
0
votes
2answers
26 views

smallest possible length of copper wire, where I can measure capacitance via multimeter [closed]

I am a new highschool physics instructor and I want to show to my students the basic concept inside the capacitors. i plan on showing them via simple 2 copper wires side by side each other, supplied ...
0
votes
0answers
9 views

Calculating pressure on a dielectric kept inside a capacitor

Firstly, the pressure is because of the opposing forces acting on both sides of the dielectric slab. On the left side of slab, the field due to the left plate is $\frac{\sigma}{2\epsilon_0}$ and ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Will a permanent dipole placed in a uniform external electric field exhibit periodic motion if it is displaced from equilibrium position?

Because at equilibrium position, the dipole is aligned along the direction of electric field and since it is a uniform electric field ,there will be no force on the dipole but it can still experience ...
3
votes
2answers
775 views

Metal sphere and charged ring

I think this is an interesting question, to which I don't really know the answer to. (Also, not a homework question.) Say you have an uncharged metal sphere constrained to move in the z-axis. There ...
3
votes
8answers
3k views

Why does Coulomb's constant have units?

I think of Coulomb's constant as a conversion factor (not sure if this is correct). Kind of like how you would do calculations in kg and then times it by the conversion constant to convert your answer ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

I have a doubt in finding workdone by a negative charge in moving it in presence of positive charge

Let say I have a positive charge at the origin. Now imagine I get a negative charge from $X=10~\text{cm}$ to $X=2~\text{cm}.$ By common sense we can say that the work done by us will be negative as ...
3
votes
1answer
141 views

Electricity from lightning

According to the internet, a lightning strike contains about 5 billion joules or 5 GJ. How was this calculated? Another thing: Once the lightning strike a metal grounded rod, a current will flow. ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Is electric potential a field?

I'm just learning about electric potential in my second-semester physics class. My textbook is emphasizing the fact that electric potential is a property of the source charges and that I'll soon learn ...
1
vote
2answers
133 views

Principle behind electrostatic shielding?

If we have a solid conducting sphere with charges around it, then the electric field inside the sphere is zero, otherwise the electrons of the sphere would not be in equilibrium as there would be a ...
0
votes
1answer
75 views

How can charge be squared?

In many Wikipedia articles I have come across it refers to a Coulomb squared. What does this mean intuitively? i.e. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farad (this was the most recent place I came across ...
21
votes
2answers
4k views

Can sugar be affected by a magnetic field?

While I was making a morning coffee at work, some sugar from the spoon started to fly away, seemingly towards some foam cups. Can this be explained by magnetism?
0
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0answers
24 views

In terms of work, what happens to a negatively charged particle circling around a positively charged rod?

Picture a positively charged glass rod from its end so that if you were to draw it on paper, it would appear as a circle. Now, suppose a negatively charged particle moves in a circular arc, on the ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the difference between electric charge and electric flux?

What is the difference between electric charge and electric flux? According to my knowledge electric flux is nothing but electric charge enclosed by the closed surface.
0
votes
0answers
48 views

Two spheres (one positive, one negative) - electric field

I posted yesterday about a problem I had and I have managed to solve one of the two I think (Here is the original post: Dielectric field in a homogenous electric field ). I didn't want to edit the ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

When two equally opposite charges placed then which type of motion will carried out b/w them? [duplicate]

I want to know that which type of motion will carried out between two equally opposite charged particles, when they placed in front of each other.
4
votes
2answers
50 views

Inconsistency with electrostatic energy formulas

The energy of point charge configuration can be written as: $$W = \frac{1}{2}\sum_{i=1}^{n}q_{i}V(r_{i}) \, ,$$ which can take both positive and negative values. However, when we integrate the ...
11
votes
6answers
2k views

Paradox with Gauss' law when space is uniformly charged everywhere

Consider that space is uniformly charged everywhere, i.e., filled with a uniform charge distribution, $\rho$, everywhere. By symmetry, the electric field is zero everywhere. (If I take any point in ...
2
votes
2answers
251 views

What is meant by 'a perfect dipole'?

Question What is meant by a perfect (electric) dipole? Additional information I came across the term in this question Force from point charge on perfect dipole and also in a textbook (which does ...
1
vote
2answers
93 views

What does “charge” actually mean? [duplicate]

I know that a charged particle is defined as a particle that experiences a force in an electric field, as explained in this post: What does a subatomic charge actually mean? However, I still don't ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Electric field inside coaxial cable

I have a very long coaxial cable with a cylindrical core of radius $a$ that has negative charge density $\rho = -k/r$ where $r$ is the distance from the axis of the cylinder, and an outer shell of ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

How do electrons repel?

I understand the basics, protons have a positive charge, neutrons have no charge, and the electron has a negative charge. But looking at the lines of force from a proton, they flow outward and push ...
2
votes
1answer
29 views

Filling a charged capacitor with dielectric material

If there is a charged capacitor (capictance $C$) connected to a battery (of EMF $V$) and the space between the plates of the capacitor is filled with a dielectric material (dielectric constant is ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Time dependent electric field: Mathematical expansion for local electric field

In many articles and books I see that local electric field is expanded as $$\vec E_0(\vec r(t)) = \vec E_0(\vec R_0) − (\vec a(t) \cdot \nabla) \vec E_0(\vec R_0) \cos(\Omega t) + \ldots $$ For ...
1
vote
3answers
68 views

What is the potential difference between $a$ and $b$ in this basic circuit, when the switch is open? [closed]

My professor says the potential difference between $a$ and $b$ is the difference between the voltages on the top left capacitor and the bottom right capacitor. My friend and I however both think it's ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Force on a charged particle due to an uncharged infinite conducting plate

How can I calculate the force on a charged particle due to an uncharged infinite conducting plate? If there is a small object with positive charge placed above a metal plate, the object induces a ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Why is the energy lost due to the internal resistance always equal to $(1/2)CV^{2}$ in a simple capacitor battery circuit? [duplicate]

Suppose we have simple circuit in which a battery of EMF $E$ is connected to a capacitor of capacitance $C$. Work done by battery $W_{b}=CV\times V$ and energy stored in capacitor ...