Electrostatics is concerned with the electrical fields and scalar potentials of stationary electrical charges and charge distributions. Use this for questions about electromagnetic situations in which currents and magnetic fields are absent, otherwise use [tag:electromagnetism] and/or ...

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Charges on capacitor after full charge by battery

When the charging is finished what will be the charge on an ideal parallel plate capacitor ? To be specific what are the charges on different faces of the 2 plates ? All the books say, after 100% ...
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2answers
58 views

Gauss Law Question. Could anyone explain to me why does S3 is 0 in this lecture note example?

Why does S3 equal to 0 ? for E3 dot dA = 0? Could I also know why does dA1 and dA2 point up and down? while dA3 point to the right?
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2answers
106 views

Electric field in a non-uniformly charged sheet [closed]

So if we have a large sheet that is not uniformly charged and is NOT a conductor, how can I find an expression for the electric field everywhere? Things we know about the sheet: the width is 2b it ...
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1answer
179 views

Why is this electric field due to one plate of a capacitor $\sigma / 2 \epsilon_0$ when the capacitor plates are finite?

We know that electric field due to an INFINTE large sheet is constant and at INFINTY the electric field is not zero. But say if I take a finite sheet of length l and width w. Then the electric field ...
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3answers
139 views

Electrostatics and two electric charges

How can two identical metallic objects have the same but opposite charges (one loses electrons and one gains electrons) when we know that metals have the ability to lose electrons only?
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2answers
1k views

Electric flux due to external charge

Why is electric flux due to external charge i.e a charge outside a closed surface equal to 0? P.S:Moreover I found this statement confusing:- Electric field appearing in the Gauss' law is the ...
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3answers
10k views

Why does the area of the plates affect the capacitance?

Why does the area of the plates affect the capacitance? Lets say I have a parallel plate capacitor with a charge of 10C and a potential difference of 5V. By the definition $C=Q/V$, the capacitance is ...
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2answers
994 views

Calculate force of electric charges “suspended” by strings [closed]

In a question: Two small plastic balls hang from threads of negligible mass. Each ball has a mass of 0.110g and a charge of magnitude q. The balls are attracted to each other, and the ...
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2answers
117 views

Charge between parallel plates given voltage

When you connect a parallel-plates capacitor to a voltage source, why is it assumed that the plates will have equal but opposite charge? According to the formula, the voltage only fixes the charge ...
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1answer
129 views

Why is the strong nuclear force > electrostatic repulsion?

In a nucleus there is a gravitational force between the nucleons and also electrostatic repulsion between the protons, and since electrostatic repulson >> gravitational attraction, it follows that ...
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4answers
2k views

Is there a limitation on Gauss' law? [duplicate]

Recently I had a question to find the electric field at a distance $R$ from the origin, where the space is filled with charge of density $\rho$. I did this by assuming a Gaussian surface of radius ...
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3answers
3k views

Is there a deep reason why springs combine like capacitors?

I was solving a practice Physics GRE and there was a question about springs connected in series and parallel. I was too lazy to derive the way the spring constants add in each case. But I knew how ...
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1answer
567 views

Confused medical student needs explanation of the electrocardiogram

From what I understand, as the heart depolarizes it turns into a lot of electric dipoles , the resultant of which can (somehow) be measured in the extremities. But how does this actually happen? How ...
13
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4answers
860 views

The maximum distance for which Coulomb's law has been verified?

We know that Coulomb's law, $F_{12} = \frac{kq_1q_2}{r^2}$, was experimentally verified for small distances by Coulomb himself at the and of the XVIII century. The question is what is the maximum ...
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4answers
470 views

Distribution of point charges on a line of finite length

How will $N$ freely moving charges confined to a line with length $L$ be distributed? What are their equilibrium positions?
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3answers
2k views

Force between two charged rods?

Suppose that we have two rods of length $l_1, l_2$ connected at one end but free to rotate. These rods have charge density $\lambda$ uniformly distributed, so the total charge of rod $i$ is $\lambda ...
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2answers
3k views

How can a conductor be grounded yet there are induced charges on it?

A classic example for the method of images is the following, quoted from Griffiths's Introduction to Electrodynamics, page 121: Suppose a point charge $q$ is held a distance $d$ above an infinite ...
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1answer
186 views

Gauss's Law of Electric Field how it actually works? & How Gauss derived it?

I want to know how Gauss derived his equation of Electric Field. Did he derive it from Coulomb's law? I don't think so. Please tell me some details about how this law works? inside a Gaussian ...
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2answers
15k views

Dirichlet and Neumann Boundary condition: physical example

Can anybody tell me some practical/physical example where we use Dirichlet and Neumann Boundary condition. Is it possible to use both conditions together at the same region? If we have a cylindrical ...
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1answer
2k views

Capacitance of two non parallel plates

What is the formula for capacitance of two non parallel plates at an angle with each other?If the plates were parallel then the value can be calculated as (PermittivityX area of one plate)/distance ...
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4answers
4k views

Divergence of a field and its interpretation

The divergence of an electric field due to a point charge (according to Coulomb's law) is zero. In literature the divergence of a field indicates presence/absence of a sink/source for the field. ...
5
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2answers
41k views

What is the electric field in a parallel plate capacitor?

When we find the electric field between the plates of a parallel plate capacitor we assume that the electric field from both plates is $${\bf E}=\frac{\sigma}{2\epsilon_0}\hat{n.}$$ The factor of two ...
5
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1answer
6k views

The formula of the force exerted on an electric dipole by non-uniform electric field

When an electric dipole of moment $\mathbf{P}$ is located in a non-uniform electric field $\mathbf{E}$, there is an net force exerted on it. However, the formula of the force in some books is read ...
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3answers
81 views

Do we know why the field produced by charge extends to infinity?

Do we have any model to show why charge field or magnetic field extends till infinity. Edit: I agree that according to coulombs law $1/r^2$ cannot be 0 but do we know why this happens.I think I am ...
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2answers
398 views

Why isn't there a potential difference across a disconnected diode?

I know this question sounds silly, as if there was a potential difference a current would be created when the terminals are connected together and this would mean energy has come from somewhere. The ...
4
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2answers
636 views

Gauss' law and an external charge

Gauss' law states that the net outward normal electric flux through a closed surface is equal to $q_{total, inside}/\epsilon_0$. However, I'm a bit confused of why the presence of an external charge ...
3
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2answers
774 views

Metal sphere and charged ring

I think this is an interesting question, to which I don't really know the answer to. (Also, not a homework question.) Say you have an uncharged metal sphere constrained to move in the z-axis. There ...
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4answers
8k views

Electric field outside a capacitor

I know that the electric field outside of a capacitor is 0 and I know it is easy to calculate using Gauss's law. We create cylindrical envelope that holds the same amount of charges (of opposite ...
2
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2answers
370 views

Why do electric field lines start and end at 90 degree at the surface of a conductor? [duplicate]

There is one property of electric lines of forces which states that: Electric field lines start and end at 90 degree at the surface of the conductor. But why is that so? Is there any proof for ...
2
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1answer
6k views

How to find electric scalar potential of infinite wire with Poisson/Laplace equation?

I though it will be easier then calculating the electric field and then integrating, but I am stuck. lets say we have an infinite wire, charged $\lambda$ per unit of length and its located at the ...
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1answer
197 views

Concrete example of the application of complex analysis in electrostatics [closed]

I've heard complex analysis can be useful in solving electrostatics problems, but despite doing some research I was unable to find any concrete examples. Would anyone be able to provide a simple ...
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3answers
3k views

Electricity & Magnetism - Is an electric field infinite?

The inverse square law for an electric field is: $$ E = \frac{Q}{4\pi\varepsilon_{0}r^2} $$ Here: $$\frac{Q}{\varepsilon_{0}}$$ is the source strength of the charge. It is the point charge divided ...
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3answers
651 views

Is this really how a capacitor works? Why doesn't it behave like a resistor?

My book says a capacitor is two conducts being connected by an insulator. Now let's take a parallel plate capacitor to simplify the problem I have. Suppose I got two parallel plate capacitor in ...
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6answers
3k views

Electrostatic Potential Energy Derivation

How is the boxed step , physically as well as mathematically justified and correct ? Source:Wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_potential_energy As work done = $- \Delta U $. for Conservative ...
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2answers
668 views

Why does electric force depend on the medium?

Comparing the equations for the gravitational and electric force $$\vec{F}_g=-\frac{Gm_1m_2}{r^2}$$ and $$\vec{F}_e=\frac{Kq_1q_2}{r^2}$$ I noticed the only major difference between them is that ...
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7answers
62k views

Why does a glass rod when rubbed with silk cloth aquire positive charge and not negative charge?

I have read many times in the topic of induction that a glass rod when rubbed against a silk cloth acquires a positive charge. Why does it acquire positive charge only, and not negative charge? It ...
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1answer
2k views

What is the penetration length of static electric field into conducting metals?

How large is the penetration length for static electric field into good conductors? I have two versions: (1) few atomic spacings $$a\sim n_{e}^{-1/3},$$ and (2) Debye length computed by Fermi ...
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5answers
3k views

How does insulating footwear prevent an electric shock?

The reason I have always heard to explain the reduction of electric shock when we wear insulating footwear goes as follows: When electricity passes from our body to the ground, an electric circuit ...
5
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2answers
260 views

Does a AAA battery have a dipole moment?

Does a AAA or D battery have an electric dipole moment? Why don't the opposite poles of two batteries attract each other like that of magnet's?
5
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1answer
238 views

Density of repulsive particles on a disk?

NB: the external circle (where particle or water is in it) is fixed ! It's a 2D theoretical problem (just for understand something in particular). Here, no gravity, no temperature. I put in a disk a ...
5
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3answers
258 views

Is it true that $\vec{E}\neq 0$ inside a 1- or 2-dimensional conductor?

It is known that when a conductor is placed in an electric field, the charges redistribute themselves such that $E=0$ inside the conductor. I was also told that the same is NOT true for the 2D and 1D ...
4
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1answer
5k views

Force from point charge on perfect dipole

Have a point charge and a perfect dipole $\vec{p}$ a distance $r$ away. Angle between $\vec{p}$ and $\hat{r}$ is $\theta$. Want to find force on dipole. I'm having more than a little difficulty ...
3
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2answers
69 views

Electric Field “at” the surface of a conductor

It has been pointed out to me that the Electric field exactly on the surface of the conductor is conventionally taken to be $E=\frac{\sigma}{2\epsilon_0}$; does this come from taking the midpoint of ...
3
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3answers
120 views

Why doesn't $\vec{E} =\frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0} \int\frac{\rho \hat{r}\;dxdydz}{r^2}$ blow up at $r=0$, when $\rho$ is finite?

Electric field at $(x,y,z)$ produced by a continuous distribution of charges is given by:$$\mathbf{E}(x,y,z) =\dfrac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0} \int\dfrac{\rho(x',y',z') \mathbf{\hat{r}} ...
3
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1answer
149 views

Realistic vs Idealistic capacitance

I am doing an investigation into the differences of calculating capacitance using the well know formula for an idealistic parallel plate capacitor, based on the assumption of a uniformly distributed ...
3
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2answers
204 views

Electric Field One-Form

I know for instance that we can interpret the electric field as the one-form that given a vector gives the change in potential in the direction of the vector, however I'm very unsure about how to ...
2
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2answers
309 views

Does a point charge exert force on itself?

Can a point charge feel the force of its own electric field? In various texts it is always mentioned about the force on a point charge in an external electric field. I think the particle does feel ...
2
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0answers
87 views

Why does Hauksbee orb or a similar device produce light?

This essentially fits well to the question asked earlier but had to placed as a separate question... An interesting and detailed answer was provided. However, there are few points, originating from my ...
2
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3answers
634 views

How much energy is needed to create an electron?

I know how to calculate the electrostatic energy of a sphere (it has a well defined radius). But how can I calculate the electrostatic energy of an electron as it is a point particle? By electrostatic ...
2
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1answer
126 views

Does Gravity Warp Coulomb's force?

Does gravity effect the "sphericalness" of the Coulomb force? For example, is the field 1 meter above a charge weaker than the field 1 meter below the charge? Could a 0.014% difference in the field ...