Electrostatics is concerned with the electrical fields and scalar potentials of stationary electrical charges and charge distributions. Use this for questions about electromagnetic situations in which currents and magnetic fields are absent, otherwise use [tag:electromagnetism] and/or ...

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Proof that the electric field is conservative

I was told a proof that the electric field was conservative (without using $\nabla$) which used a point charge and showed the following: $$w.d.=\int_c{\vec F \cdot \mathrm{d} \vec l}=\int_c{\vec ...
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20 views

Anyone know of a flow chart or list of common/useful consequences of Maxwell's equations?

I just recently started to appreciate the Maxwell equations. I had never really take the time to study them but I feel like I'm finally more familiar with them. I've noticed that it seems like a lot ...
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1answer
44 views

Electric Flux - What is the point?

Electric flux is a defined quantity that is proportional to the no. of field lines passing through a given area element for a given electric field. It is not proportional to the relative density of ...
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0answers
21 views

Why are trampolines more likely to give you a static shock when it is sunny?

It could just be in my head but I have noticed that I am more likely to get a static shock from my tramp when it is sunny than when it is not sunny. Is there a reason for this?
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1answer
86 views

Is it equivalent to derive Gauss's law from discrete and continuous source distributions?

I've seen two derivations for Gauss's law in electrostatics. The first assumes a discrete charge distribution, the second a continuous one: Use superposition $$\vec{E}=\sum_{i=1}^n\vec{E}_i,$$ so ...
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14 views

Plastic and Iron - static and magnetic

I'm wondering if when you have a ball that is made out of plastic but has an inner core of metal. Would that ball if given friction produce static? Or would the static from the outerside of the ...
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1answer
79 views

Earnshaw Theorem for ionic solids

Is a single molecule of sodium chloride (say) or a cluster of molecules of NaCl unstable, although macroscopically NaCl is in fact, stable? How can I reason this based on Earnshaw's theorem?
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1answer
49 views

Wait… why exactly does farady's ice pail experiment prove Gauss's law?

You'll notice there are no equations in this: that's because this is a question of morale, not of math. But a humble one at that! I come to learn, not to expound. But don't let that limit the form ...
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2answers
601 views

How can I split a resultant force into its $x$ and $y$ components?

Point charge 3.5μC is located at x = 0, y = 0.30 m, point charge -3.5μC is located at x = 0 y = -0.30 m. What are (a)the magnitude and (b)direction of the total electric force that these charges ...
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75 views

Electrostatics and two electric charges

How can two identical metallic objects have the same but opposite charges (one loses electrons and one gains electrons) when we know that metals have the ability to lose electrons only?
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1answer
113 views

Charge distribution on a doughnut shaped conductor

In a spherical solid conductor the charge is always on the outer surface.Even if the sphere has a cavity,the surface of the inner cavity can not carry a charge due to Gauss's Law. What would be the ...
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42 views

Electric Flux through cube from point charge

"A point charge is located at the origin. Calculate the flux of E through a cube centered on the origin and aligned with the Cartesian axes. Evaluate the surface integral directly and verify that the ...
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3answers
123 views

Polarization vector of dielectric electrostatics

I know two laws for Polarization vector of a dielectric material $$\vec P = N q \vec{\Delta L}$$ Where N is the number of dipoles per meter cube, $\vec{\Delta L}$ is the vector that represents the ...
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2answers
315 views

Effect of charges near a parallel plate capacitor

If I charge a parallel plate capacitor and I insert a charged body near one of the plates will there be any interactions like attraction or repulsion? What if I disconnect the battery?
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6answers
491 views

What keeps electrons on a negatively-charged conductor from leaving?

Imagine a negatively charged conductor in a vacuum. The excess electrons will be spread out over the surface such that the net electric field inside the conductor is zero. What keeps these extra ...
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2answers
138 views

Numerically solving 2D poisson equation by FFT, proper units

The 2D Poisson equation is: (1)$$\frac{d^2\varphi(x,y)}{dx^2}+\frac{d^2\varphi(x,y)}{dy^2}=-\frac{\varrho(x,y)}{\epsilon_0\epsilon}$$ And in $k$-space it is in form of: (2)$$(k_x^2+k_y^2) ...
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36 views

Why does excess of charge in an isolated conductor move to the surface?

A remark in my textbook goes as follows: "If an excess charge is placed on an isolated conductor, that amount of charge will move entirely to the surface of the conductor. None of the excess charge ...
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3answers
283 views

Charge outside Gaussian Surface doesn't contribute to Flux?

I roughly understand the explanation for this: any electric field line that enters the surface, must leave it, since field lines can't terminate abruptly in space. My question is, what if you have a ...
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2answers
30 views

Is work needed to bring a test charge from a higher potential to a lower potential?

I don't understand whether work is needed to bring a test charge from a higher potential to a lower potential. It seems that no work is needed because the positive test charge will be under the ...
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6answers
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Why does a glass rod when rubbed with silk cloth aquire positive charge and not negative charge?

I have read many times in the topic of induction that a glass rod when rubbed against a silk cloth acquires a positive charge. Why does it acquire positive charge only, and not negative charge? It ...
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1answer
48 views

Calculating flux of axisymmetric electric field through a sphere [closed]

The following problem and its solution is taken from I. E. Irodov's book basic laws of electromagnetism : I do not understand how the fact that field is axisymmetric leads to the conclusion that ...
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0answers
27 views

Finding potential of conducting sphere coated by a dielectric shell

An uncharged conducting sphere of radius $a$ is coated with a thick insulating shell (dielectric constant $\epsilon_r$ out to radius $b$. This object is now placed in an otherwise uniform electric ...
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0answers
67 views

Calculation of triple integrals like $ \int_{V'} \frac{ \mathbf{r} - \mathbf{r'}}{\mid \mathbf{r} - \mathbf{r'} \mid ^3} dV' $, on spherical domain [migrated]

How could one solve integrals in the form: $$ I(\mathbf{r})= \int_{V'} \frac{ \mathbf{r} - \mathbf{r'}}{\mid \mathbf{r} - \mathbf{r'} \mid ^3} dV' $$ where the domain of integration is the ...
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34 views

What is the essential concept behind the difference in the fundamental solutions of the Stokes and Poisson equations?

The fundamental solutions, i.e., the solution with a point source, of the Poisson's equation and the Stokes equations in 3D are: $$\nabla^2 f=\delta(\boldsymbol x) \ \Longrightarrow\ G(\boldsymbol ...
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1answer
87 views

Rigorous proof of Gauss' law for an arbitrary charge distribution from Coulomb's law

Most of the books about electromagnetism prove Gauss' law for a point charge in vacuum: $$ \Phi = \int_{\Sigma} \mathbf{E} \centerdot d \mathbf{S} = q/\epsilon_0 $$ and then simply state that for ...
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55 views

Relativity Paradox involving two charged particles

Suppose there are two charged particles separated by some distance $d$ both with an equal positive charge of $q$. The particles also have equal masses of $m$. $m$ and $q$ are chosen so the ...
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0answers
28 views

Can a charge moving in an open trajectory qualify as current?

It is sometimes said that a point charge is equivalent to an electric current. If it were a steady current, I should be able to find it from Ampere’s law or Biot-Savart’s law. Even if the current is ...
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1answer
328 views

What determines how much electrical charge an object can hold?

What determines how much electrical charge an object can hold? Does increase voltage force more electrical charge to be store in an object (Van de Graaff generator), since electric field increase as ...
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2answers
88 views

How does electromotive force (emf) influence electrostatic force in a circuit?

I am learning about emf and I am using university physics of Hugh D. Young which states that when the emf source is not part of a circuit the non-electrostatic force of the source moves charge form ...
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2answers
942 views

What types of materials can be electrically charged by rubbing?

What types of materials can be electrically charged by rubbing? Is there a certain type of materials in which static electricity can be produced by rubbing together two different materials?
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2answers
61 views

Using Electric Potential to Float an Object

I've been trying to answer the following question but I'm stuck at one step. The question essentially states that a magician is trying to perform a "floating objects" act, for which she has a thin ...
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13 views

Energy density in electrostatics

Imagine two hollow spheres with radius $R$ with charges $q$ and $-q$. $L>2R$ is distance between them. Potential energy of the each sphere is \begin{equation*} W_1=\frac 1{8\pi \epsilon_0}\frac ...
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1answer
54 views

How should I interpret the math in showing that the potential difference and the emf in an ideal battery are the same?

I was reading Griffiths' Introduction to Electrodyamics where he says that in order to have the same current through out a circuit there are two force per unit charges acting on the circuit, $f=f_s+E$ ...
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1answer
2k views

The electric field of a conductive sphere containing a charge - grounded vs not grounded

Let's suppose we have a sphere but unlike theoretical ones it'll have some thickness say $\Delta r$ and inner radius $R$. What I was wondering about is how will it behave if we place some charge $q$ ...
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1answer
29 views

Divergence of a vector field, going through the math [closed]

The example I'm working on has this given identity: $\bigtriangledown \cdot \mathbf{\bar{r}}=3$. The question is: find the divergence of a vector field $\bar{\mathbf{E}}=\frac{\mathbf{r}}{r^{3}}$. ...
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31 views

Why does charge build up at the boundary surface of two media?

On a homework problem, we are asked to to use the first two Maxwell equations, $$\nabla\cdot \mathbf{B} = 0$$ $$\nabla \cdot \mathbf{D} = \rho$$ to show that along the boundary surface of two ...
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2answers
616 views

How do I express the interaction energy between two charged spheres?

Consider two identical insulating spheres each with radius $R$ and uniform charge $Q$ through their volume. They are separated from their centers by a distance of $d>2R$. Here is my general ...
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1answer
43 views

Energy density what volume?

In a derivation of energy density for an electric field (see here) We get rid of the $$\epsilon_0\oint(V \vec E \cdot d\vec a)$$ term by choosing a surface sufficiently far away so that this term ...
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2answers
36 views

Is it inevitable to compute the quadruople tensor in components? Why? [closed]

I was trying to determine the quadrupole tensor for a given charge distribution in one go from this equation: $$\overleftrightarrow{D}=\int d^3r \varrho(\vec{r})\left(3\vec{r} \circ ...
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0answers
24 views

Motion of charge particle under electric and gravitational fields

I am working on one experiment in which the charged particle falls under the effect of gravity and passes through the electric field in between. I want to know what is the charge of the particle? ...
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0answers
12 views

Are centrifugal fans subject to triboelectric effects, and if so can the increase in charge be predicted and measured?

A centrifugal blower is a device that moves gas, usually under power of an electric motor. The blower housing and impeller may be metallic, but often are made of plastic materials. My question is ...
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1answer
247 views

Force due to combination of free space and dielectric

I will make a generalized form of my question. There are two point charges $q$, $x$ distance apart. And there is a dielectric slab of thickness $t$ and of dielectric constant $K$. Should the force ...
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1answer
29 views

How should one interpret $\vec{f}=0$ in an ideal battery?

In a circuit there are two forces that act on the charges to keep the current uniform through out,$\vec{f}=\vec{E}+\vec{f_s}$, where $\vec{E}$ is the electrostatic field and $\vec{f_s}$ is the ...
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3answers
9k views

Why is electric field zero inside a hollow metal sphere ?

The figure below shows a hollow metal sphere with a positive point charge $Q$ sitting outside it. What is the electric field at the center of sphere ? The answer is zero (look at here at the beginning ...
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2answers
182 views

Is it really to solve problem below by using, in the main, Gauss law?

There is an infinite cylinder surface which uniformly charged along and has a surface charge density, which can be represented as $$ \sigma = \sigma_{0}cos(\varphi ), $$ where $\varphi$ - polar angle ...
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1answer
77 views

Electrostatics problem concerning induction by a point charge inside a conducting shell

Consider two independent conducting shells (not thin shells! i.e., their internal and external surfaces do not overlap.) whose shapes of external surfaces are identical but internal surfaces are not ...
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1answer
57 views

What is the charge density in the proof of Earnshaw's theorem?

I am trying to understand the proof for Earnshaw's theorem. Though the theorem states that a collection of point charges cannot be maintained in a stable stationary equilibrium configuration ...
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1answer
21 views

Electrostatic induction in spheres

if we have a charged sphere with charge Q and radius r, the voltage on it's surface is calculated by gauss's law, what if we approach to it another sphere with radius R , R>r, earth it, remove earth, ...
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1answer
35 views

How to determine electric field strength without Gauss's Law

For objects which do not subscribe to Gauss's Law, I don't understand how one would determine the electric field strength. I know that the equation $E=k\int \frac{\mathrm{d}q}{r^2}$ can be used to ...
3
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2answers
108 views

Potential generated by a hollow sphere with a hole

The sphere has radius $R$ and is missing its "pole" - meaning that in the area $\theta\leq\alpha$ there is nothing. The object has a homogenous charge density $\sigma=\frac{Q}{\pi R^2}$ I'm trying to ...