Electrostatics is concerned with the field and potential of stationary electrical charges and electric charge distributions. Problems are this type are almost exclusively concerned with mathematics of geometries using the inverse-square law.

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Field due to current in a wire

Suppose a current flows in a straight cylindrical wire so that an electric field $\textbf{E}$ is maintained in the wire. Will there be an electric field just outside the wire..?
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Change in attraction of charged bodies

If I insert a piece of glass between two objects carrying different charges, would they still attract? If they attract, does the piece of glass affect the force of attraction and is there any formula ...
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Will the positive ions in an aqueous solution be attracted to a charged body ?

If I had a negatively charged body , say an electret , and i put it in a container of NaCl solution . Will the positive ions of sodium be attracted to it ? and why? If no, why do the positive ions ...
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Scale invariance symmetry as a simple argument in an electrostatics problem

In the comments to this post, it was hinted that proving that the force acting on a charge at a vertical distance from a uniformly charged plane is independent of that distance can be done by ...
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2answers
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How do electrons repel?

I understand the basics, protons have a positive charge, neutrons have no charge, and the electron has a negative charge. But looking at the lines of force from a proton, they flow outward and push ...
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How is Gauss' Law (integral form) arrived at from Coulomb's Law, and how is the differential form arrived at from that?

On a similar note: when using Gauss' Law, do you even begin with Coulomb's law, or does one take it as given that flux is the surface integral of the Electric field in the direction of the normal to ...
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Task with three metal plates [closed]

There are three parallel metal plates. Two boundary plates are fixed and connected with a galvanic battery, maintained a constant potential difference $\Delta \varphi$. Middle plate was initially in ...
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1answer
523 views

Capacitance and Light Bulb And Dielectric Slab [closed]

An electric lamp having coil of negligible inductance connected in series with a capacitor and an AC source is glowing with certain brightness. How does the brightness of the lamp change on reducing ...
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Will two magnets lose magnetism if they stick to each other for infinitely long time?

Here we have two magnets and they are sticking to each other. What I've learned that could possibly explain it is one magnet holds positive charge and the other one holds negative. But when the ...
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Why do grapes in a microwave oven produce plasma?

Some of you may know this experience (Grape + Microwave oven = Plasma video link): take a grape that you almost split in two parts, letting just a tiny piece of skin making a link between each ...
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171 views

Is it really to solve problem below by using, in the main, Gauss law?

There is an infinite cylinder surface which uniformly charged along and has a surface charge density, which can be represented as $$ \sigma = \sigma_{0}cos(\varphi ), $$ where $\varphi$ - polar angle ...
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A problem of missing energy when charging a second capacitor

A capacitor is charged. It is then connected to an identical uncharged capacitor using superconducting wires. Each capacitor has 1/2 the charge as the original, so 1/4 the energy - so we only have 1/2 ...
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327 views

difference between battery and capacitor in urdu languege [closed]

Heading List item List itementer code here Blockquote*emphasized text*
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Is there a deep reason why springs combine like capacitors?

I was solving a practice Physics GRE and there was a question about springs connected in series and parallel. I was too lazy to derive the way the spring constants add in each case. But I knew how ...
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1answer
285 views

Why do hydrogen atoms attract?

That is, why is the potential energy with the orbitals overlapping less than with the Hydrogen atoms 'independent'. Similarly, why is a noble gas configuration stabler than if an electron were to be ...
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1answer
188 views

Fields of Steady Currents Using Electrostatics

Suppose you have a uniform ring charge rotating at constant angular velocity so that you also have a uniform ring of steady current, and thus you can use the Biot-Savart Law to compute the magnetic ...
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1answer
501 views

Solving by using Gauss law [closed]

Task: find the vector $ \mathbf E $ in the center of the sphere with radius $R$, which has charge volume distribution $\rho$ , $$\rho = \mathbf a \cdot \mathbf r ,\qquad \mathbf a = ...
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Can two electrons never touch each other?

The Coulomb's force is given by $$ F = {k q^2 \over r^2} $$ When $ r \rightarrow 0 $, $ F \rightarrow \infty $ Does this mean two electrons never touch each other?
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1answer
347 views

What is discontinuity in Vector Fields

I am reading David J. Griffiths and have a problem understanding the concept of discontinuity for E-field. The E-field has apparently to components. (How does he decompose the vector field into the ...
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1answer
203 views

Gauss's Law in action

Need someone to tell me if I got this done correctly (a) Draw Gaussuian cylinder inside the black cylinder to find charge enclosed $Q_{en} = Q(\frac{r}{a})^2$ Apply Gauss's Law $E2\pi r \ell = ...
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1answer
107 views

What causes a spark to move along rods that are not parallel?

I took my son to a science museum where they had a gadget that many of us probably saw in movies involving a mad scientist. The gadget had two metal rods about two inches apart at the bottom. The rods ...
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378 views

Negative Mass and gravitation

Since Newtonian gravity is analogous to electrostatics shouldn't there be something called negative mass? Also, a moving charge generates electric field, but why doesn't a moving mass generate some ...
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438 views

In which cases is it better to use Gauss' law?

I could, for example calculate the electric field near a charged rod of infinite length using the classic definition of the electric field, and integrating the: $$ \overrightarrow{dE} = \frac{dq}{4 ...
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How do I integrate the Poisson equation to determine the electric potential along a particular direction (e.g., $z$)?

This question is a sequel of sorts to my earlier (resolved) question about a recent paper. In the paper, the authors performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of parallel-plate supercapacitors, ...
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Proof of charge existence on a grounded conductor

A question regarding the existence of charge on grounded conductors is confusing me. Could there be charge on a grounded conductor? How does this not contradict Gauss's Law? Since every conductor ...
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2answers
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The appearance of volume $V$ in the Fourier series representation of a periodic cubic system

In the textbook Understanding Molecular Simulation by Frenkel and Smit (Second Edition), the authors represent a function $f(\textbf{r})$ (which depends on the coordinates of a periodic system) as a ...
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2answers
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Electric potential of sphere

(a) I am a little confused about this part. The point at A to B isn't radial. The electric field is radially outward, but if I look at the integral $$\int_{a}^{b}\mathbf{E}\cdot d\mathbf{s} = ...
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What are the units or dimensions of the Dirac delta function?

In three dimensions, the Dirac delta function $\delta^3 (\textbf{r}) = \delta(x) \delta(y) \delta(z)$ is defined by the volume integral: $$\int_{\text{all space}} \delta^3 (\textbf{r}) \, dV = ...
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When I connect two charged capacitors side by side, what will be the voltage across them?

Say, I have two charged capacitors, one 3mF and one 2mF. The voltage across them are 20V and 30V respectively. Now if I connect the two capacitors side by side as shown below, what will be the voltage ...
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1answer
171 views

Why does a point charge generate an electric field and why is an electric field represented by this formula?

Why does a point charge generate an electric field and why is an electric field represented by this formula $$E ~=~ \frac{q}{4 \pi \epsilon r^2},$$ where $\epsilon$ is permittivity of free space ...
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Will a charged capacitor discharge if one lead is connected to ground?

If I charge a capacitor and connect one lead to ground keeping the other lead floating, will the capacitor discharge ? ...
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195 views

Photoelectric effect without light rays

For electromagnetic waves we have the photon association, one imagines light as particles "flying around". What is the analogy for a constant electrical field, one which doesn't change in time ...
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Why does it seem that the potential difference dependence of capacitance and total energy stored in a parallel-plate capacitor are contradictory?

Consider a parallel-plate capacitor. Charge is stored physically on electrodes ("plates") which are flat and parallel to one another. If one electrode has charge $+Q$ and the other electrode has ...
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Explanation for $E~$ not falling off at $1/r^2$ for infinite line and sheet charges?

For an infinite line charge, $E$ falls off with $1/r$; for an infinite sheet of charge it's independent of r! The infinitesimal contributions to $E$ fall off with $1/r^2$, so why doesn't the total $E$ ...
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Question on conduction

I already know that a charged polyethylene plastic (done by rubbing it with paper) can be used to attract a cardboard. Now, can I 'charge' the cardboard by touching it with the plastic? Supposedly, ...
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Is the stress finite at the centre of a spherical continuous charge distribution?

At the centre of a spherical continuous charge distribution with no external electric fields, the electric field is zero from symmetry arguments. But does the stress at the centre remain finite?
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What is the difference between a battery and a charged capacitor?

What is the difference between a battery and a charged capacitor? I can see lot of similarities between capacitor and battery. In both these charges are separated and When not connected in a circuit ...
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1answer
235 views

Electric Field on Surface of Capacitor

If I have a dielectric (a piezoelectric, to be exact) sandwiched between two platinum plates (electrodes), and connect one end to positive potential of a battery and the other to ground (I don't even ...
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1answer
324 views

Faraday's law and superconductivity

According to Faraday's law of induction, volts = -Number of coils in a solenoid * change in strength of magnet / change in time. This doesn't take into account distance or speed, only time. If amps = ...
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4answers
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If something has zero resistance, does it have infinite amperage?

If amps = volts / ohms, and ohms is 0, then what is x volts / 0 ohms?
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How does electricity flow in conductor when potential difference is applied?

Electrons move from higher potential to lower potential. When a conductor is connected to battery, electron move from negative terminal to positive terminal. But the battery itself forms a Electric ...
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What is the answer to Feynman's Disc Paradox?

[This question is Certified Higgs Free!] Richard Feynman in Lectures on Physics Vol. II Sec. 17-4, "A paradox," describes a problem in electromagnetic induction that did not originate with him, but ...
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1answer
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How can electric displacement vector field is equivalent to flux density on free space

Wikipedia states that "In free space, the electric displacement field is equivalent to flux density, a concept that lends understanding to Gauss's law". Doesn't that meant that at free space ...
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1answer
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Could someone remind me of what we mean by zero electric field “inside” a conductor?

If I have a spherical conductor (perhaps a shell) and "inside", as in the hollow area there is nothing. The electric field is 0. But what happens if there is a charge "inside" (not like inside the ...
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791 views

Simulator for electrostatics [closed]

I am searching for a tool that visualizes the electric field/potential for simple electrostatic configurations like conducting/polarized sphere in an uniform electric field conducting/polarized ...
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77 views

Permitivity $\mathcal{E}$ as a function of Voltage across a medium

What I wanted to Know was is there a change in Dielectric Permitivity constant as the voltage increases. My question arose from the fact that for a breakdown voltage to be reached the Permitivity ...
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1answer
240 views

Force due to combination of free space and dielectric

I will make a generalized form of my question. There are two point charges $q$, $x$ distance apart. And there is a dielectric slab of thickness $t$ and of dielectric constant $K$. Should the force ...
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4answers
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What are electromagnetic fields made of?

I am trying to understand electromagnetic fields so I have two question related to them. What is a electromagnetic field made of? Is it made of photons / virtual photons? How about a static electric ...
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When I connect in series two floating capacitors, one charged and the other not charged, does current flow?

Suppose I energize one capacitor by connecting it across a battery, allowing it to achieve some potential difference V0 across its plates, then disconnect it and allow both of its leads to float in ...
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Linear charge density, surface charge density and volume charge density

What is the difference among: linear charge density, surface charge density, and volume charge density?