Electrostatics is concerned with the electrical fields and scalar potentials of stationary electrical charges and charge distributions. Use this for questions about electromagnetic situations in which currents and magnetic fields are absent, otherwise use [tag:electromagnetism] and/or ...

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Does any object placed in an electric field change the electric field?

Lets say I have a point charge of magnitude $+q$, All around it I would have a symmetric radial electric field. Now if I place a neutral object lets say a sphere (doesn't matter insulating or ...
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175 views

Earnshaw's theorem and springs

Earnshaw's theorem states that the Laplacian of the potential energy of a small charge moving through a landscape full of static negative and/or positive charges (and gravity) is zero. Thus you can't ...
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270 views

Flux through a conduting cylinder?

A point charge of magnitude $Q$ is placed inside a conducting cylinder of length $L$ and radius $R$ at its centre. What is the flux through the cylinder? I know that I have to use Gauss Law here ...
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685 views

Surface charge density relation with the radius of curvature at the surface of a conductor [closed]

In a text book it was given that the surface charge density of a conductor at a particular region on its surface is inversely proportional to the radius of curvature at that region. I didn't ...
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1answer
354 views

Spherical harmonics

Given the following potential: $$V(\theta,\phi)=\frac{Q}{a}\left(\sin\theta \cos\phi+\frac{1}{2}\cos^2\theta\right)$$ on the surface of a sphere of radius $a$ I am trying to solve Laplace's Equation ...
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1answer
84 views

Capacitors in parallel and dieletric [closed]

I'm trying to solve this problem: Two capacitors of capacitance $C_1=200pF$ and $C_2=1000pF$ are connected in parallel and loaded to a potential difference of $400V$. Subsequently the space ...
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1answer
95 views

can we charge a neutral glass rod by touching it with charged glass rod?

Can we charge a neutral glass rod by touching it with charged glass rod?Can we charge similar objects by contact of which one is charged and other neutral?
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1answer
102 views

Show that the electric field, $\mathbf{\vec{E}}$ cannot be generated by any static distribution of charges

Show that the electric field $$\mathbf{\vec{E}}=\begin{pmatrix}0 \\ E_0x \\ 0\end{pmatrix}$$ where $E_0$ is a constant, cannot be generated by any static distribution of charges. I understand ...
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Is this configuration correct for this spherical capacitor? [duplicate]

This capacitance contain 4 dielectric as shown in the figure dielectric 1 in half sphere and 2,3 in for 1/4 of the sphere and the fourth one in the last 1/4 of the sphere as shown and I want to find ...
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Why are there dust particles on TV screens?

My professor gave us the following reason: The screen is positively charged. When dust particles fly near it, the positive charges in the screen induce a charge in the dust particle, pulling the ...
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106 views

what is the mechanism of water conductivity?

I'm trying to wrap my head around the kelvin water drop generator and more specifically what happens in the water before it drops. If on one side the drops of water are positive and on the other side ...
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1answer
84 views

Field created by a wire, known voltage

I am having some mental troubles with this problem I came across reading about transmission lines (I mean, it is not a problem from a book, I just thought about it). Say I have a couple of wires ...
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641 views

Why do I still get static shocks when hands are wet?

Quite a few times now I have washed my hands, and while my hands are still wet I will touch something metal and get a static shock. I thought static electricity doesn't really build up when there's a ...
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1answer
167 views

Why Gauss' law is applied?

Why Gauss' law is applied? Why is there a need of finding electric field by Gauss' law if we can find the electric field through Coulomb's law? or has it got more applications than Coulomb's law?
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726 views

Electric flux due to external charge

Why is electric flux due to external charge i.e a charge outside a closed surface equal to 0? P.S:Moreover I found this statement confusing:- Electric field appearing in the Gauss' law is the ...
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0answers
35 views

Proof of Gauss' Law [duplicate]

How would you prove Gauss' law for an asymmetrical closed surface? I can find it for symmetrical surface but couldn't for Asymmetrical surfaces.
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How is electric flux related to permittivity?

How is Gauss' law related to permittivity? I know that it equals $1/\epsilon_0$ times the magnitude of the charge enclosed. But, I'm unable to understand what it actually means. Can someone ...
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101 views

What is opposite of electric field?

A negatively charged molecule will generate a field, an electric field, and it will repel all negative ions. So what does positively charged molecule generates that causes other positive molecules ...
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3answers
2k views

What happens when a charged (negative or positive) object touches an insulator?

I know that insulators do not conduct electricity because they do not allow the free movement of electrons. Let's assume the object that's going to touch the insulator is negatively charged. Does some ...
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32 views

Charges and their configurations

Can we treat any charge configuration as small point charges by using superimposition principle to derive electric fields, forces and other things ? For example suppose we have a symmetrically ...
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Is the Earth negatively or positively charged?

The Earth carries a negative electric charge of roughly 500 thousand Coulombs. Does that mean the Earth is negatively charged?
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Can the electric field — always — be derived from the potential?

After studying the definition (& derivation) of the potential to an electric field and the Poisson equation I'm currently wondering whether the following is possible: Can one give an example of ...
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49 views

Do these steps demonstrate that acceleration of charged particle is proportional to current?

One formulation of Maxwell's Gauss Law for electric field is: $$\bigtriangledown E = 4 \pi k \rho $$ This can be worked into the Divergence Theorem as follows: $$\int\int_{A} F_\perp \:dA= 4\pi k ...
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In Jackson's expression for the electrostatic Green function, why is the Laplacian taken with respect to the primed coordinates?

Jackson writes, The function $1/|\mathbf{x} - \mathbf{x}'|$ is only one of a class of functions depending on the variables $\mathbf{x}$ and $\mathbf{x}'$, and called Green functions, which satisfy ...
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Is there any good reason/argument/heuristic why one can approximate forces by approximating the potentials?

My question Is there any good reason/argument/heuristic why one can approximate forces by approximating the potentials? (As a concrete example, in Electrostatics.) Motivation for the question I am ...
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163 views

Relation between Gauss' law and Coulomb's law

In Coulomb's law if the relation was as if electric field intensity was to vary inversely $1/r$ with distance rather than the inverse $1/r^2$ of square of distance, would the Gauss's law still be ...
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93 views

Is there another way besides $V = k\int dq/r$ to find potential?

Suppose that the charge distribution $q(r)$ in the radial $r$-direction in a thin hollow disc of inner radius $a$ and outer radius $b$ is given by the power-law equation: $$q(r) = Q_0 \left[1 ...
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2answers
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What do we mean exactly by the positive/negative charges in cathode and anode?

In batteries, what exactly do we mean by negative and positive charges? My understanding is that the negative charge of the anode is basically an atom with an extra electron in the last orbital and a ...
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1answer
125 views

Why does cloud-ground lightning occur so much less frequently over ocean?

I was talking with an acquaintance about lightning, and we came up with opposite theories and predictions for the frequency of lightning over ocean. My theory is that since seawater is a fluid ...
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1answer
1k views

The total energy of an electrostatic system

My problem is from Griffiths Introduction to Electrodynamics, Fourth Edition, p.112 Problem 2.60 (not homework): A point charge $q$ is at the center of an uncharged spherical conducting shell, ...
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2answers
693 views

Does a conductor of total charge zero placed in a uniform external electric field experience net force?

The question I have in mind is: If we place a conductor (arbitrary shape) of total charge zero in a uniform external electric field $\textbf{E}_0$, does it experience any net force? Why (not)? Now I ...
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1answer
77 views

Reduced charge for attracting electrons?

The reduced mass in the two body problem is $\mu= \cfrac{m_1 m_2}{m_1 + m_2}$. Is there any analog to this with interacting charged particles (or at least that is of use somewhere in physics)? I have ...
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158 views

Does an electric field create a pH gradient?

Since pH is a measure of the effective concentration of $\mathrm{H}^+$ ions a solution, I expect that an electric field applied to a solution will create a pH gradient. The higher concentration of ...
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89 views

Does zero change in magnetic flux always imply zero emf induced?

If you have a uniform B field, with a finite piece of wire inside it. Assuming the B field spans all space and the wire cannot leave the field. Are you able to create an emf by moving the wire ? I ...
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53 views

which induced current produce due to magnetic field?

please i want to ask when induced current produced by changing magnetic field according to faraday's law is this current DC or AC current ?
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733 views

how can electromagnetic waves reach a cell phone in faraday cage?

is there any way to make electromagnetic waves reach a cell phone in faraday cage although conductor surround cell phone everywhere , can we pass current through conductor to make charges move as a ...
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1answer
121 views

Realistic vs Idealistic capacitance

I am doing an investigation into the differences of calculating capacitance using the well know formula for an idealistic parallel plate capacitor, based on the assumption of a uniformly distributed ...
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2answers
1k views

Motion of a dipole in an electric field

Assume that we have some non-constant electric field $E(x,t)$ and a point-dipole at a position $q$ with a constant dipole moment $\vec{p}$. How would you describe the time evolution, i.e. the motion ...
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46 views

When an induced charge (ie polarization) takes place, what is the velocity of the process? Is it dependent upon the permittivity?

In a classic demonstration of inducing a charge on a dielectric, the latter is exposed to an external field. There is a resulting charge separation in the dielectric. What is the velocity of ...
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67 views

Coefficients of capitance

In my syllabus about electromagnetism, they introduce the coefficients of capacitance by stating that, if we have $n$ conductors enclosed by linear dielectrics, then we can write 'because of ...
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1answer
377 views

How can one explain the Kelvin Water drop experiment without assuming the container to already possess a positive charge?

Kelvin Water Dropper experiment refers to the electrostatic generator invented by Lord Kelvin, which uses falling water to generate a voltage by electrostatic induction occurring between ...
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1answer
984 views

Poisson's equation with a point charge source [closed]

How do you derive the solution to Poisson's equation with a point charge source? Without using Coulomb's law or the electric field! To be more explicit, we have a point charge at $(0,0)$ of charge $q$ ...
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1answer
161 views

Electrical potential difference?

What is the electrical potential difference and why we have to talk about a difference and not about the electrical potential itself? What is the electrical potential difference in practical terms ...
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1answer
765 views

Why does Hauksbee's electrostatic machine produce light?

I'm reading on the history of the discovery of electricity and the electron, and I've went from reading about Rutherford's gold leaf experiment all the way back to Francis Hauksbee's spinning glass ...
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1answer
126 views

Field of a parallel plate capacitor

Pretty much in all the diagrams I have seen the electric field of the parallel plates is depicted as in this image The field lines seems to start bending only after leaving the periphery of the ...
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2answers
221 views

Do glass beads show any piezoelectric property?

Do glass beads show any piezoelectric property? Since glass beads is mostly made out of SiO2 which is piezoelectric, will it show any piezoelectric property. Thanks. If anything wrong with my ...
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1answer
162 views

How do aspherical gravitational monopoles look like?

I was recently pointed by laboussoleestmonpays to a beautiful paper from some time ago, Aspherical gravitational monopoles. Alain Connes, Thibault Damour and Pierre Fayet. Nucl. Phys. B 490 no. ...
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1answer
135 views

Static electricty and fields inside of the conductor?

I have a few related questions about static electricity and conductors. 1. when we say static electric field inside a conductor is zero, let us take an example of two concentric conductors, outer one ...
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Boundary condition for a floating electrostatic potential

I have a (probably) simple question regarding boundary conditions. In electrostatic simulations, the relevant Maxwell equation is $\nabla \cdot \mathbf{D}=\rho$ where $\mathbf{E}=-\nabla V$, and ...
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Discrete approximation of charge density

Given the electric potential $\Phi(r)$ and the Poisson's equation: $$ \nabla^2 \Phi(r) = - 4\pi \rho(r)$$ Consider the 2-dimensional case and let's say that I want to discretize this using a square ...