Electrostatics is concerned with the field and potential of stationary electrical charges and electric charge distributions. Problems are this type are almost exclusively concerned with mathematics of geometries using the inverse-square law.

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Dielectric modification of electrostatic equations?

I have learnt that in cases of electrostatic fields inside a dielectric of any source charge, the field is reduced by a factor of K( if K, the dielectric "constant", is taken everywhere to be same). ...
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186 views

Electrons drift velocity and capacitors

My friend said this to me and just want to make sure this is right " when we connect the a battery to a LED and the 2 poles are connected, electrons flow from the (-) to the (+) but with very low ...
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1answer
132 views

One terminal of an ideal voltage source connected to earth->Massive current will flow?

Assume we have a "somewhat" ideal voltage source like a DC power supply powered by mains. Take just one terminal and form a conductive path between it and earth ground. Assuming that no conductive ...
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1answer
2k views

How to find electric scalar potential of infinite wire with Poisson/Laplace equation?

I though it will be easier then calculating the electric field and then integrating, but I am stuck. lets say we have an infinite wire, charged $\lambda$ per unit of length and its located at the ...
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2answers
447 views

Why is electric flux defined as $\Phi = E \cdot S$?

Flux, as I understand it, is the amount of substance passing through a particular surface over some time. So, from a simple perspective, considering photons that go through some virtual surface $A$ ...
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191 views

How to set up Schrodinger's equation for an electron (as a charge distribution) under its own electrostatic field

After reading about the hydrogen atom and understanding how Schrodinger's equation explains most part of the atomic spectrum of an hydrogen atom, and also came to know that, it explains most of the ...
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1answer
75 views

How can we consider charge to be continuous? [duplicate]

In electrostatics, we usually consider charge to be continuous on any body, to calculate the electric field of the body. For eg. I had proved the Shell Theorem taking an infinitesimal charge of $dq$ ...
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1answer
248 views

Coulomb potential

It is known that the Coulomb potential can be obtained by Fourier transform of the propagator from E&M. Is this because one of Maxwell's equations have the form $\nabla \cdot \mathbf{E}=\rho$?
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Is Newton's universal gravitational constant the inverse of permittivity of mass in vacuum?

Is it possible to consider Newton's universal gravitational constant, $G$, as inverse of vacuum permittivity of mass? $$\epsilon_m=\frac {1}{4\pi G}$$ if so, then vacuum permeability of mass will ...
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1answer
139 views

Source of potential energy in a capacitor being pulled apart

When the plate spacing is large the capacitor system is storing more energy than when it is small. If one manually changes the spacing, where does the additional energy "come from" as the plate ...
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1answer
230 views

what is the electric field intensity inside a charged metallic shell if there is a point charge inside the shell?

What I know so far: - Charges (electrons) inside a conductor will repel (Coulomb's law). - The charges will experience repulsion which results in maximum separation distances between the charges. - ...
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1answer
473 views

Question regarding Drift velocity in general?

The derivation of drift velocity in case of electrons is equivalent to the case of an charged ionic gas and therefore all the arguments also apply there. Now for an ideal "ionic" gas which interacts ...
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3answers
154 views

Clarity in Electric field Definition?

The electric field at a point is defined as q/$r^2$. How does this definition take the nature of source and test charge into consideration. If I bring any positive/negative charge around the source ...
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1answer
558 views

Charging by induction (and grounding)?

The very familiar phenomenon of charging by induction includes bringing a charged object near an uncharged sphere to induce a separation of charges in it and then grounding the charge (same as the ...
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2answers
127 views

Why doesn't an electrometer's capacitance influence the measurement of voltage?

I've read on the subject in several books, and none of them mentioned whether we can neglect electrometer's influence on the measurement of the voltage or not. Maybe my question sounds a bit stupid, ...
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1answer
218 views

Method of images tutorial?

I'm having an exam in Electrodynamics soon. I think I have most of it under control, but the method of images I'm not quite sure about. There is not much in my book about, so I was thinking some of ...
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4answers
108 views

Capacitors' working in a circuit

Does charge in a capacitor containing circuit stop flowing when the potential of the capacitor becomes equal to the potential of the battery??
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115 views

In electrostatics total flux linked from the closed surface enclosing the charge is equal to $Q/\varepsilon_0$. This is according to Gauss Law

In electrostatics total flux linked from the closed surface enclosing the charge is equal to $Q/\varepsilon_0$. This is according to Gauss Law. Is this the experimental value or defined value. If ...
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1answer
121 views

Dipole moment dilemmas

Dipole moment for a couple of charges, say q and -q, separated by a distance 'd' is given by 'qd' But what is for dissimilar magnitudes,say (q and 2q) or (q and -2q)? And are dipole moment defined ...
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3answers
461 views

Question regarding inverse relation of resistance with area of cross section

It is said that resistance is inversely proportional to area of cross section. But greater area will have greater electric flux, and greater electric flux will have greater magnetic flux, and greater ...
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1answer
1k views

How are excess charges distributed over non-spherical conductors?

My textbook gives the following explanation on how excess charges are spread over conductors: The excess charge on an isolated conductor moves entirely to the conductor's surface. However, ...
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2answers
247 views

What is a good read about Manning condensation? [closed]

I was assign in a course to give half an hour talk about Manning condensation. I read Wikipedia article about it as a starter, but it's only two paragraphs long and only point to the original paper ...
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1answer
164 views

Mathematical problem in integral arising in electrodynamics

I want to calculate the total electrostatic energy of the Cavendish Experiment (two concentric spheres of radii $R_{1,2}$ which are connected, outer one gets charged, then removed, then after removing ...
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Electric Field Lines between two non parallel plates [closed]

A potential difference is applied between two metal plates that are not parallel. Which diagram shows the electric field between the plates? A is the answer BUT WHY explanation needed !
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176 views

How charge distribution takes place when a battery is connected to a conductor?

When one terminal of a battery say of 1.5 volt connected to a short length wire, few electrons get transferred from battery terminal to the wire raising the potential of the wire also to 1.5 volt. We ...
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2answers
171 views

Field lines question

A friend of mine asked me this question, that is asked in an entrance examination. It shouldn't be that difficult, but I fail to find a rigorous answer for it. The figure shows three charges, that ...
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Conductors connected with a wire

Let's say I have two spherical conductors with different radii and different amount of positive charge on them. The spheres are far enough from each other. I connect them with a conducting wire. I'm ...
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149 views

Deflection/diffraction of static electric field

I know the fenomenon of diffraction (one slit) in case of electromagnetic waves. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diffraction What happens if there is only a static electric field? Let' see a figure: ...
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Electric field a distance $z$ above the center of a circular loop. The Hard way [closed]

Problem 2.5: Find the electric field a distance $z$ above the center of a circular loop of radius $r$ which carries a uniform line charge $\lambda$. This problem is in refereced here (with ...
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1answer
106 views

Behavior of the electric field on boundary surfaces

Consider this picture. Integrating over this infinitesimal box gives the following equivalencies: $$\int_{\Delta V} d^3r~{\rm div} \vec{E}(\vec{r}) = \int_{S(\Delta V)} d\vec{f} \cdot ...
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1answer
54 views

Charge in a layered ball

A ball (radius $R$) has three layers. For $0<r<a$ it is a conductor with free charge $+Q$. For $a<r<b$ it is a linear dielectric $\epsilon$ with free charge embedded in it with density ...
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60 views

Modeling the formation of a stellar system and matter accretion

I am trying to figure out what do I need to know to properly simulate the creation of a solar system from a particle cloud with random distribution of hydrogen atoms. Being more of a programming ...
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1answer
180 views

Boundary conditions for Laplace's equation

Given a grounded conducting sphere, $V=0$ and $radius = R$, centered at the origin with a pure electric dipole (dipole moment $\vec p$) situated at the origin and pointing along the positive $z$ axis, ...
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1answer
152 views

How can the accurate value of electric field intensity be calculated?

When we calculate electric field intensity for a point charge at any point inside electric field the field intensity is $E = F/q$ where $F$ is the force acting on charge $q$. In this case, the charge ...
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100 views

Is Gauss' law useful to determine the electric field strength of a charge distribution? [closed]

Under what conditions is useful Gauss' law to determine the electric field strength of a charge distribution? Can someone help me with this question?
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1answer
728 views

How much negative charge do I accumulate by touching the earth?

The Earth carries a negative electric charge of roughly 500 thousand Coulombs (according to different sources I've seen). If I touch the Earth I should therefore pick up some of this electric charge ...
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404 views

Hexadecapole potential using point particles?

We can get monopole $1/r$, dipole $1/r^2$, quadrupole $1/r^3$ and octupole $1/r^4$ potential falloff by placing opposite point charges at the corners of a point, line, square and cube, respectively. ...
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0answers
556 views

How the value of permitivity of free space is determined?

when electric charges are placed on the medium then force of interaction between them decreases. We say this factor permitivity of the medium. The force of interaction between the charges is max if ...
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242 views

Electric dipole moment, which charge is the $q$ for?

Electric dipole moment says $p = qd$. Which charge does the $q$ equal to?
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405 views

Kinetic energy of two charged balls at infinite distance between them

If I have two balls with masses and charges $m_1, q_1^{+}$, $m_2, q_2^{+}$, initially held at distance $d$, and then released, how can I know the kinetic energies of each of the balls at infinite ...
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1answer
16k views

What is the electric field in a parallel plate capacitor?

When we find the electric field between the plates of a parallel plate capacitor we assume that the electric field from both plates is $${\bf E}=\frac{\sigma}{2\epsilon_0}\hat{n.}$$ The factor of two ...
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2answers
1k views

Force Between Two Conducting Spheres

Aakash PHYSICS JEE (Main & Advanced) Study Package - 5 & 6 (Class XII) Chapter - Electric Charges and Field Assignment (page 12) SECTION - A; Q.no - 1 ...
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340 views

Potential on a Charged Sheet

I know the field difference across a charged sheet-but what's the potential on a charged sheet? Is it just asymptotic? If we had a thin cylindrical sheet would it be the same? Zero field inside the ...
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103 views

Why is the void devoid of an electric field?

For a region devoid of charge, maxwell's equation yields $\nabla \cdot \mathbf{E} = 0$ which still allows a constant field. So why is in electrostatics for the vacuum always $\mathbf{E} = 0$ assumed? ...
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1k views

Speakers and Static from Hands

Why is it that when you touch the a bare male end of a speaker feed that the speaker makes hissing noises? Is it just (eddy?) currents running through you?
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271 views

Do black holes have charges?

Do black holes have charges? If so, how would they be measured? Also, does electricity behave the same way? Black holes affect photons, which are carriers of EM radiation, so do black holes have any ...
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1answer
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What are the limits of applicability of Coulomb's Law?

Coulomb's law is formally parallel to Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation, which is known to give way to General Relativity for very large masses. Does Coulomb's Law have any similar limits of ...
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2answers
378 views

Gauss' law and an external charge

Gauss' law states that the net outward normal electric flux through a closed surface is equal to $q_{total, inside}/\epsilon_0$. However, I'm a bit confused of why the presence of an external charge ...
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6answers
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Is there a momentum for charge?

Since mass and charge behave similarly, so, just like center of mass, I define a point center of charge, that is defined by $$\vec r_{qm} = \frac {\sum{q_i \vec r_i}} {\sum{q_i}}$$ where $\vec r_i$ ...
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3answers
305 views

Horizontal $E$-field for a charged conducting disk

For part of a simulation I am writing, I need to know the electric field emitted from a charged conducting disk. If the disk was laid out in the $x$-$y$ plane, I am interested in the field in that ...