0
votes
1answer
39 views

Question about one of the problems of the Bohr model

This is probably extremely basic physics that I don't know, but I'm still going to ask: Say in hydrogen, according to the Bohr model the electron is "really" orbiting the proton, and as a consequence ...
0
votes
1answer
138 views

Can an electron stand in place of proton like a ghost standing in place of you?

The atomic orbital refers to the physical region where the electron can be calculated to be present, as defined by the particular mathematical form of the orbital 1. The picture below shows the $1s$ ...
6
votes
7answers
2k views

Does electron being many places at the same time violate Physics laws?

The following passage has been extracted from the book Parallel Worlds, by Michio Kaku: Because of uncertainty, the electron does not exist at any single point, but exists in all possible ...
1
vote
2answers
88 views

What does volume means at the quantum level?

The volume of the electron is the space bounds in which it is contained says the @CuriousOne. But how can we define the volume in such a small range. If we immerse a cuboid into a vessel full of ...
2
votes
1answer
28 views

Reconciling electron subshell configurations and the Pauli exlcusion principle

I'd like to prefix this with an apology: I have no formal training in QP, and most of what I know has been obtained by reading Wikipedia. As such, it'd be really helpful if any answers took my lack of ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Momentum of electron problem [duplicate]

Recently, my friend bemused me with a question related to the momentum of an electron. The confusing logic is stated below: Since an electron is a particle and according to classical physics, we know ...
8
votes
2answers
989 views

How does an electron move around in an orbital? Is it “wave-like” or random?

When an electron is moving around in it's orbital, is it actually moving around like a wave, like this video shows? (By wave-like, I mean, the "electron" in this video is showing it following a ...
2
votes
4answers
201 views

How did photons and electrons arise out of the quark-gluon plasma?

I am just beginning to learn about the ideas of the early universe, so this is probably a beginner question. I understand that protons and neutrons (which are baryons, which are hadrons) are made out ...
2
votes
3answers
241 views

Why can't electrons fall into the nucleus?

I read a book on pop sci book on quantum mechanics and the author said that electrons do not fall into the nucleus due to quantum mechanics- which principles suggest this (I think it was Heisenberg's ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

How hot particles can get [duplicate]

One way in which an object is affected by temperature rise is that the wavelength of the radiation it emits is gets smaller and smaller. Another way of looking at it is that as an object gets hotter, ...
1
vote
2answers
268 views

What is the spin of an electron along the x-axis?

I know that an electron or any other particle for that matter, has a measured spin which is either up or down. This spin is along the z-axis. But what if we do not measure it along the z-axis and do ...
1
vote
3answers
161 views

The need for a 'particle description' of electrons

Is there any phenomenon where the 'wave description' of the electron's motion is not applicable? The reason for this question is to find out if there are any situations were quantum wave theories ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Can an electron make a transition between sub energy states of the same energy level?

Electrons make transition between different energy levels - say, $n =3$ to $n=2$ or $n =1$, as per the applicable selection rules. My question is: can an electron make transitions between sub energy ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Can I steal your electron?

The following paragraph has been extracted from the Wikipedia (Atomic orbitals): Simple pictures showing orbital shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the ...
6
votes
6answers
504 views

Electron shells in atoms: What causes them to exist as they do?

I have seen similar posts, but I haven't seen what seems to be a clear and direct answer. Why do only a certain number of electrons occupy each shell? Why are the shells arranged in certain distances ...
4
votes
3answers
202 views

Where does the electron get its high magnetic moment from?

I have always found the concept of spin a little weird. I had read somewhere that for the charge or size of electrons, their magnetic field is very high. In order to produce such fields, they must be ...
5
votes
1answer
131 views

Why is effective mass of holes positive?

i am trying to understand this. I know that the effective mass of electrons or holes is calculated as: $$m^* = \frac{h^2}{(4\pi^2)\frac{d^2E}{dk^2}}$$ Now,if i look at this plot for example: I ...
3
votes
1answer
78 views

Proving that the electronic Schrödinger equation has no closed analytic solutions for >1 electron

It is stated in many books that analytic closed solutions to the time-independent electronic Schrödinger equation, $$\hat{H}\Psi = E\Psi, $$ exist for the one-electron problem (e.g. hydrogen atom, ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

Ionization of Electrons Intensity Relationship

Why can't light eject electrons out of atoms (ie. do ionization radiation)? Although the energy of light photons are low (more or less 2 eV), can't 5 photons consecutively hit the electron and make it ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Why photoelectron imaging is a 'complete' measurement?

In many articles and books, it says that photoelectron imaging gives a 'complete' information. What is mean by 'complete' measurement or a 'complete' information? Through photoelectron imaging ...
2
votes
1answer
78 views

What happens when work function = hf

What happens when the photon which hits a metal surface has energy equal to the work function of that surface? $$\phi = hf$$ I realise the emitted electron will have no kinetic energy after escape, ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

Differences between absorption, transparency, reflection, and emission

Can someone help me conceptualize the differences between a photon's involvement with absorption, transparency, reflection, and emission? To be more specific, my current understanding of the matter ...
1
vote
1answer
119 views

details for the double slit experiment

In the double slit experiment with electrons, are all electrons going through the slits? If the electron gun is directed between two slits, than it should hit the central part between the slits, isn't ...
0
votes
1answer
77 views

How do the wave properties of an electron change with its motion?

How do the wave properties of an electron change with its motion? What about when it is stationary?
8
votes
3answers
1k views

Why electrons have less energy than photons with the same wavelength?

I am studying quantum physics and I have a question: what is the physical explanation for electrons having less energy than photons with the same wavelength? Energy of a photon : $E = h ...
6
votes
2answers
418 views

Why do electrons in an atom 'fall' back to the ground state?

Why, after absorbing a photon does an atom's electron 'fall' back to its ground state (what causes it to immediately lose its absorbed energy)?
8
votes
1answer
176 views

Question on Uncertainty Principle

I have read about the uncertainty principle. And it applies to electrons. Then how is it that we can get exact tracks of electrons in cloud chambers?? That is to say that how is it that the position ...
4
votes
1answer
57 views

Effect of pressure increase on electron orbital wave functions

One of my nuclear physics exercises was to find out if increasing the pressure of a sample of $^{7}\textrm{Be}$ would increase the chance of electron capture to $^{7}\textrm{Li}$ occur. My reasoning ...
23
votes
3answers
1k views

Why is an electron still an elementary particle after absorbing / emitting a photon?

When an electron absorbs a photon, does the photon become electron "stuff" (energy); or, is it contained within the electron as a discrete "something"?
9
votes
5answers
750 views

What happens when we bring an electron and a proton together?

I have a couple of conceptual questions that I have always been asking myself. Suppose we have an electron and a proton at very large distance apart, with nothing in their way. They would feel each ...
1
vote
0answers
66 views

Including special relativistic effects in momentum in Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle

I've been told that an electron is somewhere within the space of $10^{-10}m$ and am supposed to find the uncertainty in its velocity. Simply applying $m\Delta x \Delta v \geq \frac{h}{4\pi}$ results ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

motion of electrons [duplicate]

Do electrons move randomly, with no preference of directions? And why electrons don't fall into the nucleus? About this question, I read the article on Chemistry wiki, which says that when electron ...
1
vote
1answer
434 views

Calculating the energy of an electron given the wavelength

Okay, so I know that the wavelength of an electron is 5e-7m and I am asked to calculate its minimum velocity and hence minimum energy. Calculating the minimum ...
0
votes
2answers
55 views

energy of electrons outside an atom

The higher the quantum number(energy levels)m the higher the energy. What does the energy refers to? Kinetic energy, potential energy, or the total mechanic energy?
3
votes
1answer
168 views

Electrons skip randomly around their orbits

I read where the electron (as well as a few other particles) skips around in its orbit randomly rather than move around the orbit smoothly. This effect has been repeatedly observed in the laboratory ...
13
votes
7answers
2k views

Does electron in wave form have mass?

I heard from my lecturer that electron has dual nature. For that instance in young's double slit experiment electron exhibits as a particle at ends but it acts as a wave in between the ends. It under ...
1
vote
2answers
586 views

Dispersion Relation (e vs. k) clarification (crystal momentum or electron momentum)

If we get the dispersion relation from the Fourier transform of the lattice vectors then how do we get electrons information? Specifically, for the $k=0$ point of the graph, does this mean the ...
2
votes
0answers
75 views

Reflector Klystron and Isolator for ESR/EPR Experiment

I am doing a lab on ESR/EPR, and I would like to know how the reflector klystron operates. It is very old and the company who made our model does not exist anymore and there are no operation manuals. ...
2
votes
1answer
346 views

How do electrons and photons interact?

Two electrons, or an electron and a proton, interact with each other because of the Coulomb potential, which can also be seen in the Schrödinger equation (which is the equation that describes the ...
5
votes
5answers
422 views

Does a photon instantaneously gain $c$ speed when emitted from an electron?

An excited electron looses energy in the form of radiations. The radiation constitutes photons which move at a speed $c$. But, is the process of conversion of the energy of the electron into the ...
2
votes
2answers
172 views

What is the reason for the electrons in a given subshell to orient in certain preferred regions?

My text book says: "Magnetic quantum number describes the behavior of electron in a magnetic field. We know that the movement of electrical charge is always associated with magnetic field. Since ...
1
vote
3answers
147 views

Electron in a covalent bond: what happens when it moves out?

Let's look at a covalent bond in, say, a water molecule: H : O : H H is bonded to O by a pair of electrons. But electrons are in constant motion. What happens when the electron leaves? Why does ...
2
votes
1answer
527 views

Is it that electron of an atom can be found anywhere in the space?

Simple pictures showing orbital shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found. The diagrams cannot, ...
2
votes
1answer
434 views

Can a macroscopic body have wavelength as that of electron? [duplicate]

Einstein has suggested that light can behave as a wave as well as like a particle i.e, it has dual character. In 1924, de-Broglie suggested that just as light exhibits wave and particle properties, ...
2
votes
3answers
196 views

What is the Bremsstrahlung or dipole radiation mechanism involved in the emission of radiation by the rotating or moving charge?

A rotating charge such as the electron classically orbiting around the nucleus, will constantly lose energy in form of electromagnetic radiation. I asked my teacher about how this radiation ...
2
votes
1answer
189 views

When an electron absorbs a photon doesn't that change it's mass?

When an electron absorbs a photon it leaps to a higher energy level, what exactly happens when an electron absorbs a photon? By the mass-energy equivalence doesn't that changes the electron's mass and ...
0
votes
3answers
701 views

What actually is meant by wave nature of electron or any other material particles? [duplicate]

Einstein has suggested that light can behave as a waves as well as like a particle i.e, it has dual character. In 1924, Louis de Broglie suggested that just as light exhibits wave and particle ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

What prevents an atom's electrons from “collapsing” onto its protons? [duplicate]

Forgive me if the answer to this is obvious. I have no formal physics training, and I remember that when I asked my physics teacher this, she just frowned and said "Good question." An electron is ...
-1
votes
1answer
103 views

How are atomic bonds created?

From what I have learned in my chemistry course, Electrons with similar quantum numbers but with opposite spin are attracted to each other. What does this mean when there is a covalent bond being ...
1
vote
2answers
91 views

What happens to the physical properties of electrons after diffraction?

Particle Wave duality shows us that waves and particles are the same thing. Therefore electrons can be viewed as both particles and waves. The wave properties of electrons can be seen in the double ...