4
votes
2answers
121 views

Where does the electron get its high magnetic moment from?

I have always found the concept of spin a little weird. I had read somewhere that for the charge or size of electrons, their magnetic field is very high. In order to produce such fields, they must be ...
4
votes
1answer
83 views

Why is effective mass of holes positive?

i am trying to understand this. I know that the effective mass of electrons or holes is calculated as: $$m^* = \frac{h^2}{(4\pi^2)\frac{d^2E}{dk^2}}$$ Now,if i look at this plot for example: I ...
3
votes
1answer
59 views

Proving that the electronic Schrödinger equation has no closed analytic solutions for >1 electron

It is stated in many books that analytic closed solutions to the time-independent electronic Schrödinger equation, $$\hat{H}\Psi = E\Psi, $$ exist for the one-electron problem (e.g. hydrogen atom, ...
0
votes
1answer
11 views

Ionization of Electrons Intensity Relationship

Why can't light eject electrons out of atoms (ie. do ionization radiation)? Although the energy of light photons are low (more or less 2 eV), can't 5 photons consecutively hit the electron and make it ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Why photoelectron imaging is a 'complete' measurement?

In many articles and books, it says that photoelectron imaging gives a 'complete' information. What is mean by 'complete' measurement or a 'complete' information? Through photoelectron imaging ...
2
votes
1answer
51 views

What happens when work function = hf

What happens when the photon which hits a metal surface has energy equal to the work function of that surface? $$\phi = hf$$ I realise the emitted electron will have no kinetic energy after escape, ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

Differences between absorption, transparency, reflection, and emission

Can someone help me conceptualize the differences between a photon's involvement with absorption, transparency, reflection, and emission? To be more specific, my current understanding of the matter ...
1
vote
1answer
88 views

details for the double slit experiment

In the double slit experiment with electrons, are all electrons going through the slits? If the electron gun is directed between two slits, than it should hit the central part between the slits, isn't ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

How do the wave properties of an electron change with its motion?

How do the wave properties of an electron change with its motion? What about when it is stationary?
8
votes
3answers
785 views

Why electrons have less energy than photons with the same wavelength?

I am studying quantum physics and I have a question: what is the physical explanation for electrons having less energy than photons with the same wavelength? Energy of a photon : $E = h ...
6
votes
2answers
222 views

Why do electrons in an atom 'fall' back to the ground state?

Why, after absorbing a photon does an atom's electron 'fall' back to its ground state (what causes it to immediately lose its absorbed energy)?
8
votes
1answer
166 views

Question on Uncertainty Principle

I have read about the uncertainty principle. And it applies to electrons. Then how is it that we can get exact tracks of electrons in cloud chambers?? That is to say that how is it that the position ...
4
votes
1answer
54 views

Effect of pressure increase on electron orbital wave functions

One of my nuclear physics exercises was to find out if increasing the pressure of a sample of $^{7}\textrm{Be}$ would increase the chance of electron capture to $^{7}\textrm{Li}$ occur. My reasoning ...
23
votes
3answers
1k views

Why is an electron still an elementary particle after absorbing / emitting a photon?

When an electron absorbs a photon, does the photon become electron "stuff" (energy); or, is it contained within the electron as a discrete "something"?
8
votes
5answers
490 views

What happens when we bring an electron and a proton together?

I have a couple of conceptual questions that I have always been asking myself. Suppose we have an electron and a proton at very large distance apart, with nothing in their way. They would feel each ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Including special relativistic effects in momentum in Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle

I've been told that an electron is somewhere within the space of $10^{-10}m$ and am supposed to find the uncertainty in its velocity. Simply applying $m\Delta x \Delta v \geq \frac{h}{4\pi}$ results ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

motion of electrons [duplicate]

Do electrons move randomly, with no preference of directions? And why electrons don't fall into the nucleus? About this question, I read the article on Chemistry wiki, which says that when electron ...
1
vote
1answer
161 views

Calculating the energy of an electron given the wavelength

Okay, so I know that the wavelength of an electron is 5e-7m and I am asked to calculate its minimum velocity and hence minimum energy. Calculating the minimum ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

energy of electrons outside an atom

The higher the quantum number(energy levels)m the higher the energy. What does the energy refers to? Kinetic energy, potential energy, or the total mechanic energy?
3
votes
1answer
141 views

Electrons skip randomly around their orbits

I read where the electron (as well as a few other particles) skips around in its orbit randomly rather than move around the orbit smoothly. This effect has been repeatedly observed in the laboratory ...
13
votes
7answers
2k views

Does electron in wave form have mass?

I heard from my lecturer that electron has dual nature. For that instance in young's double slit experiment electron exhibits as a particle at ends but it acts as a wave in between the ends. It under ...
1
vote
2answers
411 views

Dispersion Relation (e vs. k) clarification (crystal momentum or electron momentum)

If we get the dispersion relation from the Fourier transform of the lattice vectors then how do we get electrons information? Specifically, for the $k=0$ point of the graph, does this mean the ...
2
votes
0answers
54 views

Reflector Klystron and Isolator for ESR/EPR Experiment

I am doing a lab on ESR/EPR, and I would like to know how the reflector klystron operates. It is very old and the company who made our model does not exist anymore and there are no operation manuals. ...
2
votes
1answer
251 views

How do electrons and photons interact?

Two electrons, or an electron and a proton, interact with each other because of the Coulomb potential, which can also be seen in the Schrödinger equation (which is the equation that describes the ...
4
votes
5answers
360 views

Does a photon instantaneously gain $c$ speed when emitted from an electron?

An excited electron looses energy in the form of radiations. The radiation constitutes photons which move at a speed $c$. But, is the process of conversion of the energy of the electron into the ...
2
votes
2answers
132 views

What is the reason for the electrons in a given subshell to orient in certain preferred regions?

My text book says: "Magnetic quantum number describes the behavior of electron in a magnetic field. We know that the movement of electrical charge is always associated with magnetic field. Since ...
1
vote
3answers
131 views

Electron in a covalent bond: what happens when it moves out?

Let's look at a covalent bond in, say, a water molecule: H : O : H H is bonded to O by a pair of electrons. But electrons are in constant motion. What happens when the electron leaves? Why does ...
2
votes
1answer
293 views

Is it that electron of an atom can be found anywhere in the space?

Simple pictures showing orbital shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found. The diagrams cannot, ...
2
votes
1answer
286 views

Can a macroscopic body have wavelength as that of electron? [duplicate]

Einstein has suggested that light can behave as a wave as well as like a particle i.e, it has dual character. In 1924, de-Broglie suggested that just as light exhibits wave and particle properties, ...
2
votes
3answers
168 views

What is the Bremsstrahlung or dipole radiation mechanism involved in the emission of radiation by the rotating or moving charge?

A rotating charge such as the electron classically orbiting around the nucleus, will constantly lose energy in form of electromagnetic radiation. I asked my teacher about how this radiation ...
2
votes
1answer
154 views

When an electron absorbs a photon doesn't that change it's mass?

When an electron absorbs a photon it leaps to a higher energy level, what exactly happens when an electron absorbs a photon? By the mass-energy equivalence doesn't that changes the electron's mass and ...
0
votes
3answers
367 views

What actually is meant by wave nature of electron or any other material particles? [duplicate]

Einstein has suggested that light can behave as a waves as well as like a particle i.e, it has dual character. In 1924, Louis de Broglie suggested that just as light exhibits wave and particle ...
1
vote
1answer
904 views

What prevents an atom's electrons from “collapsing” onto its protons? [duplicate]

Forgive me if the answer to this is obvious. I have no formal physics training, and I remember that when I asked my physics teacher this, she just frowned and said "Good question." An electron is ...
-1
votes
1answer
99 views

How are atomic bonds created?

From what I have learned in my chemistry course, Electrons with similar quantum numbers but with opposite spin are attracted to each other. What does this mean when there is a covalent bond being ...
1
vote
2answers
86 views

What happens to the physical properties of electrons after diffraction?

Particle Wave duality shows us that waves and particles are the same thing. Therefore electrons can be viewed as both particles and waves. The wave properties of electrons can be seen in the double ...
5
votes
2answers
671 views

What made Bohr quantise angular momentum and not some other quantity?

Bohr's second postulate in Bohr model of hydrogen atom deals with quantisation of angular momentum.But, I was wondering why he quantised angular momentum and any other quantity?
0
votes
2answers
157 views

Do any other particles get excited(or absorb energy) by photons like electrons?

Electrons get excited to different energy levels when photons of specific frequencies fall on them.But, is there other particles which absorb the energy of the photons?
-1
votes
1answer
132 views

Aren't all electrons the same? So what about electron that absorbs photon?

I learned that electron absorbs a photon and goes into higher energy state. But also all electrons are identical. What is a difference between the electron in low orbital energy state? and the high ...
-1
votes
1answer
78 views

Electron in strong magnetic field [closed]

What if we apply a very strong magnetic field to an electron so that it's position be a constant. Then if it's position is constant, it's momentum will also be a constant. But it is in violation of ...
1
vote
2answers
323 views

What is the significance of electron spin quantum number?

Somewhere I read that spin quantum number is a particularly interesting theory of quantum mechanics as what it really implies is that particles like electrons do not come back to the initial state of ...
1
vote
1answer
198 views

Confusion about the probability cloud

What is the meaning of the electron probability cloud? I understood it to mean that the electron has a probability to be found in a certain postion before measurement, but now after reading ...
0
votes
2answers
166 views

Which is more characteristic of an element absorption or emission spectrum?

Absorption and emission spectrum are used to reveal the identity of an element and even to find new elements. But, which of them is more characteristic? The mission spectrum would have more lines ...
7
votes
5answers
313 views

Do orbitals overlap?

Yes, as the title states: Do orbitals overlap ? I mean, if I take a look at this figure... I see the distribution in different orbitals. So if for example I take the S orbitals, they are all just ...
1
vote
2answers
131 views

Stern-Gerlach and Hund's second rule

According to Hund's second rule, the spin tends to be maximal. That would, in my understanding, imply that, regarding the Stern-Gerlach experiment, the important electron in a silver atom has spin ...
6
votes
2answers
353 views

“Correlation energy” using the pair correlation function

In this paper on the Quantum Hall effect the authors refer to something called the correlation energy of electrons. It is defined at the top of page 5 as $E=\frac{n}{2}\int (g(r)-1)V(r)dA\ ,$ where ...
3
votes
2answers
188 views

How does electron know when to change into a wave?

It is known that electron behaves as a wave also. How does electron know that it has to change into a wave? Are there any factors that influence the behavior of electron changing into wave?
0
votes
2answers
298 views

Do electrons have a radius when they behave like a particle?

I know sometimes electrons behave like waves, but it sometimes can be seen as a particle. while it's a particle, does it have a radius? or, a volume? If it doesn't even have a volume, how can we still ...
4
votes
1answer
273 views

How can we describe the electrons of multi-electron atoms (i.e. not Hydrogen) when equations/analytic solutions only exist for Hydrogen?

I've been digging into emission spectra of different elements and found that such things as the Rydberg equation, Bohr's model, and quantum mechanics can only fully describe the single electron in the ...
0
votes
2answers
701 views

Do excited electrons drop back to same quantum state?

I'm trying to wrap my head around spectroscopy, therefore, I am looking for as complete an answer as possible here, hence why I have broken the question into a different points. Here is what I know ...
5
votes
1answer
436 views

Do electrons need specific energies to excite electrons

Photons need specific energy levels, equal to the difference between two energy levels to excite an electron in an atom. Is this the same case with electrons that collide with atoms?