0
votes
1answer
45 views

Photoelectric Effect - How are the electrons regained?

When the photons with enough energy impinge on a photocathode, it emits electrons. Does this mean that the solid will lose all its electron at one point? If not, how are electrons restored?
0
votes
2answers
47 views

If an atom is positively ionized, can is gain electrons if you emit photons at it?

I read somewhere that electrons and light are just electromagnetic radiation and are basically the same thing, does this mean that if you emit photons at an atom it will gain electrons?
4
votes
3answers
120 views

How do photons know they can or can't excite electrons?

This might be a stupid question, but nonetheless, it has been bothering me. If you take a photon, make it go through some atoms in a solid, liquid or whatever, then you have the chance of this photon ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Understanding EM Fields

I am an electronics engineering major and some questions arise when studying communications technology that utilizes wireless technology. In particular, I am more of a complete picture kind of person, ...
5
votes
2answers
370 views

How many subatomic particles can absorb/emit photons?

Is the electron the only subatomic particle that can absorb and emit a photon?
2
votes
1answer
63 views

What happens when work function = hf

What happens when the photon which hits a metal surface has energy equal to the work function of that surface? $$\phi = hf$$ I realise the emitted electron will have no kinetic energy after escape, ...
3
votes
1answer
51 views

Differences between absorption, transparency, reflection, and emission

Can someone help me conceptualize the differences between a photon's involvement with absorption, transparency, reflection, and emission? To be more specific, my current understanding of the matter ...
-3
votes
1answer
47 views

Black Body and Electron [closed]

My questions are: How does a black body absorb photons? Why does a black body absorb the most photons of all objects (e.g. those with another color)? Are there any relationship between the ...
0
votes
0answers
188 views

Compton Scattering: Klein-Nishina formula derivation

I'm following a derivation of the Klein-Nishina formula from scratch and this is what I have so far: $P_{e,i} = m_0\gamma_u[1,u]$ and $P_{\gamma,i} = [\frac{\hbar\omega_i}{c^2}, ...
8
votes
3answers
843 views

Why electrons have less energy than photons with the same wavelength?

I am studying quantum physics and I have a question: what is the physical explanation for electrons having less energy than photons with the same wavelength? Energy of a photon : $E = h ...
23
votes
3answers
1k views

Why is an electron still an elementary particle after absorbing / emitting a photon?

When an electron absorbs a photon, does the photon become electron "stuff" (energy); or, is it contained within the electron as a discrete "something"?
2
votes
2answers
64 views

What is relation between electrons and photon? [closed]

What is the relation between electrons and photons? Why do atoms get excited when their electrons come in contact with photons? Why do electrons go from a higher to lower energy level when emitting a ...
5
votes
3answers
122 views

Do free electrons really not interact with photons?

If free electrons don't interact with photons, why are free electrons accelerated by electromagnetic fields?
-1
votes
1answer
108 views

Can a wave exist on the “face” of a wave?

It would seem that this would be possible with waves in water. What about other waves Clarification: Given a wave starting from a point of impact, in water, at: Time 0:00 and xyz 0,0,0 and the ...
2
votes
1answer
271 views

How do electrons and photons interact?

Two electrons, or an electron and a proton, interact with each other because of the Coulomb potential, which can also be seen in the Schrödinger equation (which is the equation that describes the ...
4
votes
5answers
377 views

Does a photon instantaneously gain $c$ speed when emitted from an electron?

An excited electron looses energy in the form of radiations. The radiation constitutes photons which move at a speed $c$. But, is the process of conversion of the energy of the electron into the ...
1
vote
1answer
111 views

What gives substances their color?

As far as i know (i may be wrong!), substances appear to have a definite color because they reflect/ transmit all the light rays of the given color, and absorb all the lights rays of the remaining ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

Why do photons excite electrons?

I know that when electrons encounter photons, they become excited and move to an orbit farther away from the nucleus of an atom as a result. What I want to know is exactly why the photons cause the ...
0
votes
2answers
734 views

Do excited electrons drop back to same quantum state?

I'm trying to wrap my head around spectroscopy, therefore, I am looking for as complete an answer as possible here, hence why I have broken the question into a different points. Here is what I know ...
1
vote
2answers
827 views

Collision between a photon and an electron

Looking through this AP Physics question, I was struck by how the 'collision' between a photon and electron looks so much like a macroscopic collision. Is this even physically possible? Look at the ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Transfer of electron energy to atoms (heating up of matter by absorption of photons)

If an electron absorbs a photon to get exited to a higher energy level, it should either come back to same state or any other lower state by emitting the required photon. How then can there be a net ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

If photons can be absorbed by electrons, wouldn't that mean light has a charge? [duplicate]

I am a biochemistry and molecular biology major. If photons can be absorbed by electrons, wouldn't that mean light has a charge? Electrons only attract positive charges. Isn't it?
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Do protons exchange photons with electrons?

I'm sorry for this question but, I just don't get it. According to the electromagnetic field theory, electrons repel each other by exchanging photons. How do protons attract electrons, by photon ...
0
votes
3answers
409 views

Couldn't we measure electrons with good enough technology? [duplicate]

I am a bit confused about the Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle - just read about it in How to Teach Physics to Your Dog, by Chad Orzel. He states that the reason electrons can't be measured is ...
3
votes
1answer
127 views

Absorption cross section for direct dissociation and predissociation - Photoelectric absorption

Why the absorption cross section in direct dissociation process is wide and structureless while the absorption cross section in the predissociation process is structured and containing lines which are ...
3
votes
1answer
94 views

A question about how light hits a surface

my question is about how photons travel from a light source and hit an object. When you look at an object being hit by light the whole surface becomes brighter. What i'm trying to understand is why ...
3
votes
2answers
279 views

Does the electromagnetic field “spin”?

Due to electron "spin", a small magnetic field is produced. Maxwell's equations imply that magnetic fields are due to changes in electric fields. Is the magnetic field produced then because the ...
2
votes
1answer
101 views

Ejected Electrons with 0 KE?

So I was taught that: Kinetic Energy (of electron) = Energy (of photon) - Ionization Energy If E(photon) = IE, then KE=0 of the electron. What does this physically/theoretically mean? My current ...
1
vote
1answer
294 views

Why photons are emitted because of changes to electron behavior

Explanations I have read of why photons are emitted from atoms mention electrons being 'excited' to another energy level, and then returning to their base level, releasing a photon. I have also seen ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

How many photons can an electron absorb and why?

How many photons can an electron absorb and why? Can all fundamental particles that can absorb photons absorb the same amount of photons and why? If we increase the velocity of a fundamental ...
0
votes
1answer
229 views

The electron jumps and lets loose photons

Where is the source of the photon. If the photon propagates from within the electrons transit does this point to some sort of field? Does the energy come from a boundary being broken in laymens ...
2
votes
2answers
454 views

Electron model under Maxwell's theory

I was not able to recall my memories, so: What is the formula that states the frequency of electrons revolving around nucleus is equal to the frequency of light (or photon) emitted (or radiated)? (I ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

Is there a point interaction model of the electron?

Is there a point interaction model of the electron? Is there a point interaction model of the electron? I imagine something like $\propto(\bar \psi\psi)^2$ (edited). Is such a thing in use? Since I ...
-4
votes
1answer
177 views

True or false? Particle physics [closed]

It is not possible to prove the point of origin of a photon It is not possible to prove the point of origin of a free electron It is not possible to prove that protons or neutrons exist inside a ...
8
votes
1answer
914 views

Why are noble gases used for lights?

I know that neon is used in advert signs due to its inertness. However, I am not entirely sure how the inertness is exploited. I think it is because Ne being inert means that after electricity frees ...
6
votes
5answers
3k views

Spontaneous pair production?

So I've been looking into particle-antiparticle pair production from a gamma ray and don't understand one thing. Let's say I have a 1,1 MeV photon and it hits a nucleus - electron-positron pair with ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

Why photons transfer to electrons perpendicular momentum?

Linear antenna directed along z, photons (EM waves) propagate along x. Momentum of photons have only x component. Why electrons in antenna have z component of momentum?
1
vote
2answers
400 views

Is energy exchange quantized?

In the photoelectric effect there is a threshold frequency that must be exceeded, to observe any electron emission, I have two questions about this. I) Lower than threshold: What happen with lesser ...