Negatively charged particle with spin 1/2. A component of mundane terrestrial matter, and part of all neutral atoms and molecules. It has a mass about 1/1800 that of a proton. Its antiparticle is the positron.

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How do I determine resistivity from electron defects of high purity gold?

I am trying to create a plot for the electrical resistivity of high purity gold from 1 K to 1000 K. I found gold's resistivity at 300 K using the Wiedemann-Franz Law based on thermal conductivity data ...
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3answers
63 views

How “earthing” electricity work?

I made a simple bulb-battery circuit and then I cut one of the wires and attached both ends to cemented floor, the bulb didn't glow, this means cemented floor is a ...
8
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1answer
154 views

Question on Uncertainty Principle

I have read about the uncertainty principle. And it applies to electrons. Then how is it that we can get exact tracks of electrons in cloud chambers?? That is to say that how is it that the position ...
3
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1answer
52 views

What is an electron/hole pocket and what is the significance?

What is an electron/hole pocket and what is the significance? I'm trying to get my head around this. I've read what Ashcroft and Mermin have to say on the subject, but it's a little convoluted. They ...
2
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2answers
49 views

Electron Electric Field Mass?

I am confused of whether or not the expected electromagnetic field generated by the point-like electric charge of the electron distributed smoothly across space as a probability distribution creates ...
4
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1answer
39 views

How did Lyman discover his series?

How did Lyman discover his series in hydrogen atom? How did he know that the final energy level is the first level and not the second or the third or etc.? Or how did the other scientists know which ...
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1answer
41 views

Effect of pressure increase on electron orbital wave functions

One of my nuclear physics exercises was to find out if increasing the pressure of a sample of $^{7}\textrm{Be}$ would increase the chance of electron capture to $^{7}\textrm{Li}$ occur. My reasoning ...
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1answer
24 views

Can electrons coincidentally flow along a circuit to cause current?

My understanding of circuits which are not supplied an e.m.f. is that the electrons randomly just flow about in random directions, and since there's so many of them, probability dictates that any ...
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0answers
31 views

How to estimate size of nucleus from minimum scattering angle of electrons? [closed]

I have the following problem: Electrons of energy 350MeV are scattered from a nucleus. The scatter pattern shows a minimum at a scatter angle of 45°. Estimate the size of the nucleus. I feel ...
22
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3answers
1k views

Why is an electron still an elementary particle after absorbing / emitting a photon?

When an electron absorbs a photon, does the photon become electron "stuff" (energy); or, is it contained within the electron as a discrete "something"?
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5answers
350 views

What happens when we bring an electron and a proton together?

I have a couple of conceptual questions that I have always been asking myself. Suppose we have an electron and a proton at very large distance apart, with nothing in their way. They would feel each ...
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1answer
29 views

The probability of electron-hole pair recombination as a function of physical proximity

When we shine line of an appropriate wavelength at a metal, e.g. gold, such that there is sufficient energy to promote an electron from the valence band to the conduction band, we'll generate with ...
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1answer
43 views

Fermi wavelength of graphene

Does anybody know the Fermi wavelength of graphene? I searched the Internet for a while without success. I found, by inspection with the Fourier transform of an S.T.M. image $$ 3.84e^{-10} \mathrm{m}. ...
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19 views

electron pathways [duplicate]

if there are two identically equal resistance paths, and you have a large group of electrons, will half of the electrons travel lets say left and half right? because I've been thinking that maybe the ...
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0answers
34 views

Including special relativistic effects in momentum in Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle

I've been told that an electron is somewhere within the space of $10^{-10}m$ and am supposed to find the uncertainty in its velocity. Simply applying $m\Delta x \Delta v \geq \frac{h}{4\pi}$ results ...
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3answers
44 views

Why leaf of electrometer doesn't repel each other in water?

Why leaf of electrometer doesn't repel each other in water? Normal electrometer filled with air will repel like it should do for electrostatic demonstration, but what if filled with water instead or ...
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0answers
24 views

Drift velocity of electrons in a superconducting loop

Do electrons travel at the Fermi velocity in a superconducting loop? For metals the Fermi velocity seems to be around $10^6$ m/s. So would electrons (in a Cooper pair) travel around the loop at this ...
4
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1answer
36 views

Question on static electricity & electron transfer

Static electricity is caused by the transfer of electrons between substances right? For example, take a balloon and your hair. Both are stable and electrically neutral. So why would electrons jump ...
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0answers
31 views

motion of electrons [duplicate]

Do electrons move randomly, with no preference of directions? And why electrons don't fall into the nucleus? About this question, I read the article on Chemistry wiki, which says that when electron ...
2
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2answers
57 views

What is relation between electrons and photon? [closed]

What is the relation between electrons and photons? Why do atoms get excited when their electrons come in contact with photons? Why do electrons go from a higher to lower energy level when emitting a ...
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1answer
62 views

Why electrons get excited? [closed]

Why and how are electrons get excited and what happen inside an atom when electrons get excited?
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1answer
56 views

Calculating the energy of an electron given the wavelength

Okay, so I know that the wavelength of an electron is 5e-7m and I am asked to calculate its minimum velocity and hence minimum energy. Calculating the minimum ...
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2answers
35 views

energy of electrons outside an atom

The higher the quantum number(energy levels)m the higher the energy. What does the energy refers to? Kinetic energy, potential energy, or the total mechanic energy?
2
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1answer
66 views

Electrons skip randomly around their orbits

I read where the electron (as well as a few other particles) skips around in its orbit randomly rather than move around the orbit smoothly. This effect has been repeatedly observed in the laboratory ...
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1answer
50 views

How do magnetic objects exhibit attraction/repulsion across empty space?

Magnets will attract or repel over a distance before physically touching each other. What makes this effect possible? My best guess is that the forces generated by the angular momentum of the ...
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2answers
76 views

Do free electrons really not interact with photons?

If free electrons don't interact with photons, why are free electrons accelerated by electromagnetic fields?
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1answer
40 views

Does charge of a metal charged by induction determine by which ends of the metal is grounded to?

Does charge of a metal charged by induction determine by which part of the metal is ground to? I draw a diagram to make it simple to understand: Right diagram: When ground is touched with the ...
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0answers
29 views

Electron and photon interaction

Assuming I shoot a beam of light to an electron, the electron will take the energy and reemit EMR at all direction randomly? If it will, is it happening at the same time?
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3answers
122 views

How does electricity flow?

The terminals of the batteries set up an electric field in the wire. Surface charges build up to ensure the field is perpendicular to the wire. This allows the electrons to move through the wire. But ...
3
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1answer
252 views

Batteries and voltage?

The voltage of a battery gives you the difference in potential energy 1C of charge would have at the positive terminal vs the negative terminal. If I connect a wire to both terminals, the battery ...
0
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0answers
46 views

Why are free electrons always moving?

Electrons move when a field acts on them. If the electrons move towards the field, they cancel out the field when enough electrons build up. Shouldn't the free electrons stop moving eventually and ...
0
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1answer
23 views

How would an electron bunch/beam look different in the rest and lab frames?

With respect to special relativity, I was wondering how the spatial dimensions would differ between the rest and LAB frame of an electron beam. System: Electron bunch/beam traveling in linear motion. ...
2
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1answer
45 views

Is this process possible for L=0? $e^+e^- \to 2\eta_c$

For the following $$e^+ e^- \to \eta_c \eta_c$$ I think it violates parity conservation so it can't happen, but is there any other reason as to why it can't take place? Or is it actually possible?
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1answer
46 views

What is the speed of electrons in a transistor?

What is the average speed of an electron in a MOSFET transistor, and how can you calculate this? I've heard people throw terms such as "drift velocity" and "Fermi velocity" around, but I've never ...
3
votes
0answers
38 views

How does Cooper pairing work?

Cooper pairs are one of the models how superconductivity is explained. What still baffles me is how a vibration of the crystal lattice (the so-called phonon) can interact with the electron (an actual ...
4
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5answers
276 views

Inside a conductor?

My textbook says the field inside a conductor must be zero in order for the system to be equilibrium and therefore there must be no excess charge inside. Their proof: 1) Place a gaussian surface ...
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7answers
2k views

Does electron in wave form have mass?

I heard from my lecturer that electron has dual nature. For that instance in young's double slit experiment electron exhibits as a particle at ends but it acts as a wave in between the ends. It under ...
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0answers
50 views

What if the surface charge on a conductor is positive?

This site says that if the field at the surface at the conductor has a parallel component, then the surface charge will move, which is impossible if the conductor is at equilibrium. But I learnt ...
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3answers
94 views

is an electron gun dangerous?

Is an electron gun dangerous & what would be the repercussions to human tissue? If I were to do a DIY electron gun and put my hand in the beam would I regret it?
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1answer
100 views

Can a wave exist on the “face” of a wave?

It would seem that this would be possible with waves in water. What about other waves Clarification: Given a wave starting from a point of impact, in water, at: Time 0:00 and xyz 0,0,0 and the ...
0
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0answers
68 views

Why do electrons and protons attract each other? [duplicate]

In the end, are they not a condensed form of energy? I want the 'Why' to go as far as it takes. Where it ends? What are the constituents of the electron and proton, that make them attract each ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Electrons scatter light; x-ray diffraction

why accelerated electrons "scatter" light? From Yale's chemistry open class, the professor said when a light passes by an electron, it "pulls" the electron up and down, and emit radiation in all ...
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2answers
167 views

Dispersion Relation (e vs. k) clarification (crystal momentum or electron momentum)

If we get the dispersion relation from the Fourier transform of the lattice vectors then how do we get electrons information? Specifically, for the $k=0$ point of the graph, does this mean the ...
0
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1answer
24 views

Drift speed of electrons when the object is grounded

So I know that the drift speed of electrons is usually pretty slow. Let's say I have a charged sphere and I would ground it over a wire. How fast would the electrons leave the sphere? Would that drift ...
2
votes
0answers
41 views

Reflector Klystron and Isolator for ESR/EPR Experiment

I am doing a lab on ESR/EPR, and I would like to know how the reflector klystron operates. It is very old and the company who made our model does not exist anymore and there are no operation manuals. ...
1
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1answer
72 views

The workings of the Hall effect?

I want to ask about the workings of the Hall effect. Why do the electrons come to rest on the edge of the wire? The magnetic field pushes them up, and the electric field pushes them forward. Shouldn't ...
6
votes
2answers
178 views

If electrons behave as standing waves when they are bound to an atom then how do they carry charge?

Today in my physics lesson we learnt that the best way of describing the behaviour of an electron that is bound to an atom is to treat it as a standing wave. I understand that this is the ...
3
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5answers
103 views

Which electron gets which energy level?

Electrons sit in different energy levels of an atom, the farther the higher energy is. Every electrons have the same structure, they can gain energy from environment, electrons which gained energy ...
4
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1answer
68 views

Does the cavity magnetron in a microwave oven produce x-rays?

It seems like it should due to bremsstrahlung, since we're talking about electrons with 5-7KeV of energy slamming into the walls of the device, but I've found no information about this online, so I'm ...
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1answer
33 views

Charge or Charges on the oil droplets?

Due to my poor understanding of various paper and other material provided by google on Millikan's oil drop experiment I ask the following question here. As the drops were charged by either friction ...