Negatively charged particle with spin 1/2. A component of mundane terrestrial matter, and part of all neutral atoms and molecules. It has a mass about 1/1800 that of a proton. Its antiparticle is the positron.

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Can an Atom be negatively as well as positively charged simultaneously?

For example there are three atoms- atom A, atom B, atom C. Atom A has 3 electrons, atom B has 4 electrons and atom C has 2 electrons. If we bring together atom A and atom B, in this case atom A is ...
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877 views

In an electron-positron annihilation, in what direction are the photons released?

I read that, in an electron-positron annihilation, at least 2 photons are produced, because of the law of conservation of momentum. my question is: in what direction are those photons released? and ...
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47 views

How can 99% empty matter have solidity? [duplicate]

If a simple atom with electrons whizzing around constantly is 99% empty space, one would think any solid-looking matter was 99% empty space. How can 99% empty matter have solidity?
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10 views

Searl effect generator simulation

This is an scheme of SEG: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUUvhuQtba4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAMrTxMzrds This mechanism change the electrons around the conversor. Would be really nice to ...
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30 views

Trying to understand electron diffraction

I'm trying to understand how electron diffraction works, but I'm not really getting it. Here's an image Here are a couple of questions about it that I can't figure out. Why is the angle of the ...
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28 views

Velocity of electrons during transition to different energy

I was watching a documentary of quantum mechanics (this video). They said something about quantum leap, jumping of electrons from one energy state to other. I want to ask how electrons travel though ...
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1answer
31 views

Can we generate electric current by injecting electrons into a copper panel

Suppose I take a vacuum tube and accelerate electrons in it by electric fields then collide it on a copper plate. Will the electrons then go inside it and generate an electric current by putting a ...
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35 views

Electricity should deform the conductor then why doesn't it?

In electric current both negative particles and positive particles flow but in opposite directions. So why doesn't the conductor's shape deform because its particles are moving here and there? OR is ...
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22 views

Will electron repulse by superconductor or at least change trajectory?

Suppose we have an electron gun which is bombarding superconductor. Would the electron get repelled or change its trajectory? It is well known that electrons are sources of magnetic fields. Also it ...
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19 views

Excitation energy of carotene using the particle in a box model

I'm practicing for an exam and I came across the following question: The linear, conjugated π-electron system of a carotene molecule comprises 11 atoms and the distance between two atoms is 1.4 Å. ...
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29 views

How can I choose my desired direction in which the electrons travel?

If I take a circular vacuum tube (like a particle accelerator) and try to accelerate the electrons in it with a bunch of magnets and like charged panels to repel or attract the electron in it and ...
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42 views

Can we create a electric field without actually using a battery or power source?

Can we create an electric field without actually using a battery or a source of electricity? Like a take 2 panels, one is positively charged and another is negatively charged and put them parallel to ...
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52 views

Definition of charges

We say that a body is negatively charged when it has excess electrons otherwise say positively or uncharged. We also say that electrons are negatively charged. By the above statement, it has more ...
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2answers
114 views

Why is the spectrum of a blue flame the way it is?

In the spectrum of the blue part in a candle flame, there’s a violet emission at 432 nm due to excited CH* molecules (chemiluminescence). Why 432? Why not 400 or 500? There are emissions at 436, 475 ...
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50 views

What stops charges from jumping across a capacitor?

I've learnt in class that charges store up on capacitor plates (the electrons). But why don't the electrons just jump across capacitor, what stops them? At first I thought perhaps it might just be the ...
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3answers
69 views

Does every material thing just consist in forces?

My dad's an aeronautical engineer. The other day, I visited a pub with him. A friend of his introduced him to someone who told us he was an electrical engineer. My dad replied with what I presume was ...
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23 views

How does an electron beam condenser work?

For example, a scanning electron microscope has multiple condensers that "focus" the beam into a smaller spot size. How does a condenser actually change the direction of electron flow in a non-uniform ...
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3answers
211 views

Are electrons held together by vacuum energy?

If one models the electron as a hollow spherical conductor with charge $e$ and radius $a$ then its electrostatic energy is given by: $$E_{em}=\frac{1}{2}\frac{e^2}{4\pi\epsilon_0a}$$ However if one ...
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2answers
169 views

Light, being a probability wave, carries energy; does an electron wave also carry energy? If so, how?

The entity "light" behaves as a wave & particle. The wave is actually probability wave . That is, to every point in a light wave we can attach a numerical probability that a photon can be ...
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6answers
158 views

Rutherford's gold foil experiment: can alphas be deflected by electrons vs. nucleus?

In this experiment, is it possible that some of the alpha particles are deflected by the electrons? Gold, after all, usually also has ~79 of them in each atom. Since the alpha particles want ...
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80 views

Why does the electric dipole moment of the electron tell us about its sphericity? [duplicate]

There are a bunch of experiments that claim to show that the electron is highly spherical by measuring the electron electric dipole moment. See e.g.: ...
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2answers
52 views

Why don't electrons fall on the ground, off the charged wire?

Please, don't mind if my question is silly, but I was always wondering... Imagine we have a negatively charged metailc wire. Let's assume it's just hanging on a thin rope. What force keeps electrons ...
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2answers
37 views

Why do the free electrons in N-type want to diffuse?

I'm trying to understand how a diode works and for this I've used(among other resources) the book written by Albert Malvino, Electronic Principles. Everywhere I read about this topic, it says that ...
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1answer
43 views

Why does my shirt make a crackling noise when it is static?

I thought that when clothing becomes "static" (used as a colloquial adjective for that state when clothing fresh out of the drier sticks to everything) it's because of a build up of electrons. That's ...
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2answers
29 views

Is the screen in CRT connected with a positive pole?

I don't understand this passage would you clarify it? "These electrons are then freed (liberated) from the metal and are then picked up by the screen, which is connected to a positive pole called the ...
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1answer
45 views

Can an electron which is a bound in an atom absorb more than one photon at the same time? [duplicate]

Can an electron which is a bound in an atom absorb more than one photon at the same time ? In specific during photo-electric emission can an electron take in more than one photon if one photon doesn't ...
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1answer
117 views

Do electron shells exist within equipotential regions?

I had to read up on equipotential surfaces recently and I noticed the pattern of equipotential surfaces around a point charge. The idea came to me then that since no work is done in moving charges ...
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44 views

Repulsion of electric charges

If a take a vacuum tube and put electrons in it and put a negative ion strip or something like that outside the tube will the electrons inside the tube start moving due to the repulsion of charges of ...
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1answer
57 views

Electricity is the movement of electrons or ions?

Electricity is the movement of electrons from one atom to another or the movement of charged negative particles (ions)?
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153 views

How do you rotate spin of an electron?

I can't seem to connect these two stories. Can you please help? I have heard that you have to turn electron by 720 degrees in order to get the same spin state. Has this been seen experimentally? How ...
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1answer
59 views

Work functions of ceramics/insulators

Is anyone aware of or know of a good source or means of estimating the work function of a ceramic material? Typically, work functions are given for pure elemental metals, rather than for compounds, ...
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2answers
142 views

Are electron fields and photon fields part of the same field in QED?

I know in classical field theory we have the electromagnetic field. And Maxwell's equations show how electromagnetic radiation can propagate through empty space. I also have been reading about QED ...
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1answer
19 views

Why would a photon striking an electron “make both recoil”? [duplicate]

Why would a photon striking an electron "make both recoil" as I read in an answer to another question. If the photon is massless, how can it make an electron change momentum?
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5answers
288 views

Why do we need a wave function?

Assuming our only aim is to solve double slit experiment (or other problems that can be mapped into that). Knowing that electron does some strange thing not expected of a particle, we need a function ...
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2answers
55 views

Does the speed of electrons depend on energy?

I would like to know whether the speed of an electron depends on energy. If yes then in a circuit when electrons flow out of a resistor the energy decreases by a considerable amount, leading to the ...
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4answers
114 views

Can an excited atom have multiple electrons in excited states?

For an excited atom, is it possible for the atom to be excited twice, having multiple electrons in higher energy levels than for the atom in its ground state? If it is indeed possible, what is the ...
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1answer
35 views

What's the relation between molecular orbitals and electron density?

The way molecular orbitals are drawn represent the "encapsulated" space in which the wave function has a significant amplitude. How do I obtain from this the electron density? Is there a fundamental ...
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3answers
270 views

Are electrons miniature black holes? [duplicate]

For something to be a blackhole, it must have gravity and the radius must be smaller than the schwarzschild radius for its mass. -Electrons have gravity -Electron are theoretically believed to be ...
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0answers
72 views

Is an electron technically a set of two particles?

The electron - described as a four-spinor in the Dirac equation - transforms according to the $(1/2,0)\oplus(0,1/2)$ representation of the Lorentz group, so it is actually a direct sum of a left- and ...
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1answer
30 views

Is a CRT / Electron gun in need to be in a closed loop?

I'm trying to understand electricity and there for electrons. And so far i believe i am grasping it. But there are a few parts i have a hard time understanding. For example in as i understand it, in ...
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1answer
43 views

What is the factor that controls the speed of electrons accelerating in vacuum?Won't they accelerate infinitely? [duplicate]

We all know that speed of light can not be exceeded. So the question is if electric field accelerates electron in a vacuum tube with enormous length won't the electron accelerate till a point where it ...
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1answer
316 views

What proved Conventional sense wrong?

What fact proved for the first time that the conventional sense of current was wrong? And when it did happen? As a corollary of this question, why do we say that electrons have negative charge? Is it ...
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2answers
31 views

Units of rutherford singly differentiated cross section for secondary electron production

I have an equation that I have found in several papers which I am currently using for a project, including Waligorski (1986) and this book page 32. 4.2 BUTTS AND KATZ MODEL Butts and Katz ...
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1answer
27 views

where does the kinetic energy of electron revolving in nucleus go when photoelectric effect takes place?

we all have been studying that when photon is incident on alkali metal surface, photo currents are created due to ejection of electron after exceeding the work function.but the electron do have ...
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0answers
22 views

Calculation of energy deposit of photon beam

Let's say I shoot a 1 MeV photon beam onto a volume. I want to know the ratio of deposited dose per path length for different materials (water and air) at a certain position (e.g. x=0) in the volume. ...
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1answer
41 views

Help me understand static electricity

This is what I understand about electricity: (The following information is paraphrased from the book CODE by Charles Petzold.) Atoms are made up of protons, electrons and neutrons. Protons and ...
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1answer
491 views

Does the spin of electrons imply a more complex structure than has been observed? [duplicate]

If electrons have no substructure and are considered point particles (according to the Standard Model), then how can they also have intrinsic spin? It would seem that the fact that they exhibit spin ...
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7answers
433 views

Momentum of stationary electron in a curl free vector potential

The essence of this question is simplicity itself: There is an electron in a curl-free $\vec{A}$ field. The electron is stationary so its m$\vec{v}$ momentum is 0. However, it has "momentum" from ...
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17 views

Gamma photon excitation of electron

Can a single high energy photon excite more than one electron in an atom?
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1answer
55 views

How do you calculate the free space wavelength of an electron? [closed]

The only thing I know about an electron is that its mass is $m_0 = 9.109 * 10^{-31} kg.$ How would you calculate the wave length from here? Ok, using de Broglie's relation we have $p = h/\lambda_e$ ...