Negatively charged particle with spin 1/2. A component of mundane terrestrial matter, and part of all neutral atoms and molecules. It has a mass about 1/1800 that of a proton. Its antiparticle is the positron.

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Can Electron capture occur with an external electron

Can electron capture happen with an external electron with an atom that decays by electron capture?
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30 views

Open Source Particle Tracing Software

I am fairly new to this forum. I am designing an ionospheric plasma testing environment in a thermal vacuum chamber and to do so I require some form of multi-physics package for simulations .. such as ...
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1answer
28 views

Can electrons within a positive ion absorb and reflect light?

I understand that in a crystalline metallic structure, such as one making up a bar of gold, there are one, or more, valance electrons of each atom that have left their outer shell (became free ...
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Help finding peak electron concentration? [on hold]

Any tips or thoughts on how to do this problem? Thank you!
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2answers
69 views

Element 137 - Theoretical limit [duplicate]

I've seen a few sources that mention the speed of an electron in a hydrogen atom is 1/137 the speed of light. This article also mentions what looks like a correlation between atomic number and the ...
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48 views

How can “…electrons flow in metals, but not in the ground…” explain grounding rods?

I really enjoyed Why is the charge naming convention wrong? But, in the comments at the very end, the statement that "...electrons flow in metals, but not in the ground..." left me uneasy. I was ...
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31 views

Where are the electron exchanges happening in solar cell physics when considering the photon?

When considering solar panel physics, are we taking an electron from Light(photon), or is the energy of Light causing an electron to jump in said solar cells through excitation? Is the photon even ...
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3answers
46 views

How do free electrons conduct heat in a metal?

In a metal, how do free electrons conduct heat? Does the specific heat of a metal should be then related to the electrons and not the atom of the metal?
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1answer
26 views

Can the probability of electron capture in a metal hydride be increased by extreme electric current?

An example of a metal that can hold a lot of hydrogen is palladium. The hydrogen atoms (protons) in the metal lattice are positive and the electrons are negative. When a large electric potential is ...
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1answer
52 views

Can an absorbed photon be emitted as two photons?

I am taking an intro to astronomy class, and have touched upon absorption and emission lines and etc, the prof asked this question in class and got me thinking. I would want to say no, because one ...
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42 views

If increasing applying energy to an atom excites electrons, why does electrical conductivity decrease as temperature increases?

Applying energy to an atom makes the electrons jump up to higher energy levels. This is known as excitation. Electrons on higher energy levels are easier to remove from an atom than those on lower ...
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4answers
605 views

Why do electrons jump between orbitals? [duplicate]

When an electron is excited to higher energy levels, it will jump back to the same level from which it was excited. Why does it develop "sentiment" with that level?
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2answers
100 views

A Neutron Star and an Atom are Similar [closed]

In an earlier question I asked if photons could exist without atoms. Is a neutron star's residual light released similar to an exited atom the difference is gravity hold in the electrons in the star ...
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1answer
41 views

Absorption of photon as particle by an electron

As the photon gets absorbed by the electron and goes to higher energy state, does the photon remains in the electron itself in some form (radiation energy), thereby increasing the mass of electron?
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49 views

Some questions related to circuits and flow of electrons

I have some doubts related to electric fields and flow of current. So, let us assume an electric circuit, which contains a battery and a wire connecting positive and negative terminal of the battery. ...
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0answers
42 views

What would happen if a monochromatic light falls on an electron?

An electron is not strictly free, but in terms of QFT, we consider scattering events in an asymptotic framework where free particles would arise at $t \rightarrow \pm \infty$. So, I would like to know ...
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56 views

Why doesn't an electron's charge rip the electron apart?

Like charges repel. What keeps an electron's charge from repelling itself? This problem would come up if an electron was divisible and its parts had fractional charge. A related question is, what ...
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1answer
25 views

What causes depletion layer to form?

I am trying to understand why and how a depletion layer forms between a P type and N type semiconductor. Before putting into contact a P type and N type semiconductor, both are electrically neutral. ...
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2answers
159 views

Does relativity violate uncertainty principle?

Let us say I sit on an electron. According to me the electron is at rest. Also, I will know the position of the electron accurately as I can take the electron as the origin. So, I know both position ...
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1answer
75 views

Mathematical proof of an electron cant absorb a photon [duplicate]

How can we mathematically prove that a free electron cant absorb a photon totally?
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1answer
66 views

Protons, electrons and integers

From this calculation (https://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080724101956AA4zed1), two protons seperated by the distance of one atom feel the electromagnetic force repelling them ...
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1answer
19 views

Larmor Frequency for Spin Transition

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/magnetic/larmor.html Consider the process of Larmor precession of the magnetic moment associated with the spin angular momentum of an electron inside a ...
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1answer
59 views

Why do scientists measure fundamental constants so precisely?

According to the last CODATA report the charge of electron is measured very precisely (10 decimal places). And it's not only about the charge of electron. Why do scientists measure fundamental ...
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1answer
66 views

How did scientists manage to measure the charge of electron so precisely?

According to the latest CODATA reports the charge of electron is known very precisely $\approx 1.6021765314 \times 10^{-19}$. My question is: How is this charge determined with such high precision? ...
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32 views

Does an atom become positively charged as a result of Beta decay? [duplicate]

Since a neutron breaks down into an electron and a proton, and the electron is emitted as beta particles, the atom has an extra proton (protons>electrons). So, the atom becomes positively charged. But ...
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41 views

Why can't a neutral object attract another neutral object because of electrostatic induction?

So a positive/negative charge can attract a neutral object by causing the negative/positive charges to move closer to the source. However, if you have a neutral object and another neutral object ...
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28 views

Energy of a relativist electron [closed]

I need to find a way to obtain $E = mc^2(\gamma -1)$ by starting with : $E = mc \cdot p = mc \cdot v \cdot \gamma$ with $ \gamma = \frac {1}{\sqrt{1-\frac{v^2}{c^2}}}$
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35 views

Quantum mechanics of electron beam and measurement

I'm trying to understand the following phenomenon quantum mechanically: Problem statement If I'm shooting an electron beam (using a vacuum tube for example) and I have a measuring device at a ...
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22 views

Electron energy from beta decay

I read in my IB-physics book that the average energy for an electron in the beta decay of Potassium-40 is 0.44 MeV. However this would imply the electron have a velocity of 3.9E8 m/s, i.e. faster than ...
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39 views

Where does the lowered effective mass of electrons come from?

It is a known fact that electrons in the conduction band of a semiconductor can (in certain scenario's) be described as having an approximate parabolic dispersion relation of the form $E_c(k) = E_c + ...
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73 views

Holding an electron

Heisenberg has said that the position and velocity of a small object cannot be known 100% accurate. Now, suppose I take a big metal box within which there is only one electron (somehow). I don't know ...
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49 views

energy distribution of electrons from the heated cathode in magnetic field

I have a very specific question which is troubling me. I use a heated disk cathode as an electron emitter. I know that the energy distribution of the electrons emitting from the cathode is ...
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2answers
122 views

Why doesn't gravity mess up the double slit experiment?

So let's say you are doing a double slit experiment. Also, let's use electrons. My question is, won't the gravity of the electron affect the earth, thereby causing it decoherence and its wave ...
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1answer
24 views

Electron gun; potentials around charged plates

I know that an electron gun releases electrons by thermionic emission and accelerate the electron through charged plates, and that the electrons are not gaining any energy after they leave the gap ...
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1answer
38 views

How many times can I “recharge” a phosphorescent material? Can an atom run out of its electrons?

I have a phosphorescent material and I was wondering how many times I can make it emit light by recharging it with light. I roughly know the physics behind it, I've learnt about photo-luminescence and ...
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96 views

Can atoms lose electrons by themselves?

I know atoms lose or gain electrons through ionic bonding but when they are by themselves do they lose electrons? I read in a book on metallic bonding which involves free electrons(the lost ones) and ...
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36 views

How does the interaction between individual electrons of beams affects the diffraction pattern?

Consider the diffraction of an electron beam. How does the interaction between individual electrons of beams affects the diffraction pattern? If it really affects the diffraction pattern, then is ...
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1answer
59 views

Charge distribution in electron

In the Wikipedia article Classical electron radius in calculation of radius of electron. Charge distribution of electron described as $$\rho(r)= \frac{q}{4{\pi}Rr^2}$$for $r\leq R$. This is variable ...
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1answer
31 views

Plane-wave to a particle: micro to macro perspective

recent study have invoked a question which I wish you could help with. So in quantum that I learned that the wave function of electrons in a free-potential behave as plane waves, even in solids with ...
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2answers
104 views

Electron-positron annihilation [duplicate]

Photon pair production in electron-positron annihilation is necessary to conserve the linear momentum. In such discussions the electron-positron pair collide with equal and opposite momentum, if they ...
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1answer
28 views

Where can I find the Auger emission spectra of the most common chemical elements?

I am looking for an online resource where I can find the Auger emission spectra of (most common) chemical elements, i need them for AES (Auger Emission Spectroscopy). Thank you.
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1answer
58 views

By what mechanism is a photon emitted or absorbed in atomic electron state transitions?

I understand atomic emission and absorption spectra well - photons of a specific energy can be emitted or absorbed by atoms, if that energy corresponds perfectly to the energy difference between two ...
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1answer
22 views

Qualitative difference between bremsstrahlung and thermal bremsstrahlung

Hopefully this is an easy question. I hear the terms bremsstrahlung and thermal bremsstrahlung being used. However, I, incorrectly, thought that they were used interchangeably. So, what is te ...
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134 views

What is electron?

In quantum mechanics, we easily talk about some "particles" or "somethings" like electron and photon. Besides, in classical mechanics we talk about particles that have mass. As we know, one can ...
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1answer
40 views

Is the electric field in the wires of the parallel circuit always the same and how that affects current?

When we connect two resistors connected in parallel with a battery, it creates an electric field through this wire. well, my question here: Is the electric field in the main wire is the same as the ...
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22 views

How do electrons move across depletion region in npn transistor? [duplicate]

Concerning the base-collector barrier, the electrons coming from the emitter move through the barrier using diffusion mainly and drift. Does carrier injection happen as a result of these two ...
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1answer
70 views

Why does an electron lose all of its energy in a resistor?

Why does the electron uses nearly all of its energy for one resistor in a simple circuit made of a battery, wire, and resistor? I really need to know what happens exactly at the atomic level in the ...
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65 views

Rest mass energy of electron

For electron's energy why we some time use the word "REST MASS ENERGY" why we use this word as electron is always spinning? ...
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45 views

Voltage and Current

I know that as voltage increases, current increases by $V=IR$, but I really find some difficulty in understanding this at the atomic level (what happens with the electrons inside that wire). I ...
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1answer
123 views

Is it true that the standard model does not predict the mass of the electron?

I read that the standard model has parameters that have to be put in such as the mass of the electron, because nobody has been able to calculate the mass of the electron. Is this true?