Negatively charged particle with spin 1/2. A component of mundane terrestrial matter, and part of all neutral atoms and molecules. It has a mass about 1/1800 that of a proton. Its antiparticle is the positron.

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2
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2answers
37 views

Bekenstein bound for electron?

Using the Wikipedia version of the Bekenstein bound, and substituting the Wikipedia values for electron mass and radius, one obtains 0.0662 bits. Does this really mean that a system, any system, ...
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4answers
1k views

Are voltages discrete when we zoom in enough?

Voltages are often thought of as continuous physical quantities. I was wondering whether by zooming in a lot, they are discrete. I feel like the answer to the above question is yes as voltages in the ...
10
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3answers
2k views

An electron has no known internal structure, does that imply it has an unknown one?

I'm currently reading Alonso and Finn's Electromagnetism book. It explains that the spin contributes to the magnetic moment and is somewhat comparable to a rotation of the particle around its own ...
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1answer
45 views

Can an electron make a transition between sub energy states of the same energy level?

Electrons make transition between different energy levels - say, $n =3$ to $n=2$ or $n =1$, as per the applicable selection rules. My question is: can an electron make transitions between sub energy ...
4
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2answers
132 views

What restores balance to a repulsive electric force on an electroscope?

I am an amateur physics enthusiast (during the day I am a police officer), and recently, I learned how to build an electroscope. I regret that I am learning how wonderful our universe is so late in my ...
3
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3answers
95 views

How do photons know they can or can't excite electrons?

This might be a stupid question, but nonetheless, it has been bothering me. If you take a photon, make it go through some atoms in a solid, liquid or whatever, then you have the chance of this photon ...
1
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1answer
65 views

Understanding EM Fields

I am an electronics engineering major and some questions arise when studying communications technology that utilizes wireless technology. In particular, I am more of a complete picture kind of person, ...
0
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0answers
44 views

What is electron hole? Isn't it just an absence of electron? [duplicate]

I was reading Wikipedia article about impact ionization and there's something in it's definition that makes me wonder: Impact ionization is the process in a material by which one energetic charge ...
0
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1answer
15 views

How does exciting an electron's surrounding electromagnetic field cause 'electron excitation'?

In more meaningful words than the ones above, how does adding energy to the EM field cause the electron to to change orbitals or oscillate in a different pattern.
5
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2answers
367 views

How many subatomic particles can absorb/emit photons?

Is the electron the only subatomic particle that can absorb and emit a photon?
1
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1answer
18 views

What factors cause the velocity saturation to occur at different electric fields for different materials?

In semiconductors the velocity of carriers gets saturated after a certain value of electric field. In silicon it occurs at around $10^4 kV/cm$ and in GaAs at some other value. What factors are ...
2
votes
2answers
70 views

What is Quantum jump of an electron?

Can any one define quantum jump 9 quantities jump of an electron ? I know it it is a silly question but can anyone please explain me in detail.I am a learning about the structure of atom and I want ...
6
votes
2answers
976 views

Can I steal your electron?

The following paragraph has been extracted from the Wikipedia (Atomic orbitals): Simple pictures showing orbital shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the ...
6
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6answers
408 views

Electron shells in atoms: What causes them to exist as they do?

I have seen similar posts, but I haven't seen what seems to be a clear and direct answer. Why do only a certain number of electrons occupy each shell? Why are the shells arranged in certain distances ...
0
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0answers
49 views

Double slit experiment with slit material acting as a detector

Suppose the classic experimental setup of the double slit experiment. What is the probability that an electron does not pass through the slits? That is, for every single electron that comes from ...
1
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2answers
46 views

Correlation in electron gas

In the textbooks that I read (namely Ashcroft/Mermin , Marder, etc.) it seems that a distinction is made between the correlations in electron gas and a Couloumb interaction between the electrons. What ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

How do I describe the energy an electron gains (and loses) in a circuit?

I am looking at the simple circumstance of an electron traveling through a long wire by a potential. I see how one would be motivated to use the usual formula, W=F*d, to describe the electron's net ...
4
votes
3answers
170 views

Where does the electron get its high magnetic moment from?

I have always found the concept of spin a little weird. I had read somewhere that for the charge or size of electrons, their magnetic field is very high. In order to produce such fields, they must be ...
1
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1answer
35 views

Are all identical fermions in orthogonal states as opposed to different general states?

A professor told me that most physicists assume that all identical fermions are in completely orthogonal states. If that is true, then does that mean that that the total wave function is highly ...
1
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2answers
29 views

Would a magnetic field be affected permanently if it interacts with another magnetic field?

Would a magnetic field still be changed after it stops interacting with another magnetic field. As far as I know, a magnetic field is generated by spinning electrons. Thus, does a magnetic field ...
0
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1answer
34 views

How does a minority carrier diffuse?

I have gone through a lot of questions but none of them ask how do the minority carriers approach the depletion layer in the first place. When a p-n junction is formed, negative space charge ...
61
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2answers
10k views

Why doesn't matter pass right through other matter if atoms are 99.999% empty space?

The ghostly passage of one body through another is obviously out of the question if the continuum assumption were valid, but we know that at the micro, nano, pico levels (and beyond) this is not even ...
3
votes
2answers
76 views

A question about the Thomson experiment

Recently, I was studying about Thomson's experiment with cathode rays. My textbook shows it like this. It says: When only electric field is applied, the electrons deviate from their path and ...
0
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3answers
59 views

The measurement of electricity

I'm a student trying to understand electricity. As I learned from school, electricity is the flow of electrons, but I'm confused about the measurement of electricity. As I learned, voltage is the ...
5
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4answers
434 views

How does the speed of electrons change around a circuit?

I have been thinking about ways of teaching electronics and I'm wondering if the following is true... For starters, when we talk about voltage as energy per unit charge, is this energy manifest ...
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1answer
38 views

Atomic Physics - Bohr's model of atom

Well I'm learning about the models that have been proposed for the atom, and the Bohr model came up. My teacher told me that the one of the main postulate of the theory is that when an atom is in ...
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3answers
58 views

What really is resistance? How does it generate heat?

OK I know that R= V/I. I also know that R = ρl / A But what I want to know is that what really causes resistance? Is resistance equivalent to force? or is it just a constant? Also, what causes ...
4
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1answer
99 views

Why is effective mass of holes positive?

i am trying to understand this. I know that the effective mass of electrons or holes is calculated as: $$m^* = \frac{h^2}{(4\pi^2)\frac{d^2E}{dk^2}}$$ Now,if i look at this plot for example: I ...
3
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1answer
65 views

Proving that the electronic Schrödinger equation has no closed analytic solutions for >1 electron

It is stated in many books that analytic closed solutions to the time-independent electronic Schrödinger equation, $$\hat{H}\Psi = E\Psi, $$ exist for the one-electron problem (e.g. hydrogen atom, ...
0
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1answer
11 views

Ionization of Electrons Intensity Relationship

Why can't light eject electrons out of atoms (ie. do ionization radiation)? Although the energy of light photons are low (more or less 2 eV), can't 5 photons consecutively hit the electron and make it ...
1
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2answers
80 views

Can we pass electricity through air?

Electricity: I was wondering, whether we can pass electricity through air over a distance of 100 meters or so as electricity means the flow of electrons and we have seen the discharge or movement of ...
1
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0answers
29 views

Numeric value of the electrons drift velocity in superconductors

Somebody knows the numeric value of electrons drift velocity in superconductors? How this value depends from the used superconductor material? What's about the current? Since the electrical resistance ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

EM field of free moving electrons?

if I stretch two wires parallel to each over and in a little distance and I let through them slow moving electrons, do I measure a current in the wires? Of course the electrons don't hit the wire. ...
0
votes
3answers
41 views

Alternating Current Inquires [duplicate]

I have been looking in to alternating current and I am confused. If the voltage reverses doesn't the flow of electrons also reverse? I am aware of another fair answer on this site here. That answer, ...
1
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0answers
50 views

Formation of atoms [closed]

If a Proton goes toward an Electron with a trajectory that forms a circular motion, these particles will form an atom ?
1
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1answer
44 views

Atomic physics question - exciting of electrons during bonding

As I have learnt, when bonding takes place in an atom, such as carbon, the electron in its $s$-subshell gets excited and jumps to the open spot in the $p$-subshell. This is why carbon is able to form ...
4
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1answer
61 views

Do metals have their distinctive look because of the electron sea which surrounds the metal atoms?

are metals shiny because of the electron sea which surrounds the atomic lattice of the metal sample. are metals more shiny because the electron are more evenly distributed on the surface?
2
votes
2answers
48 views

Is an object's color/shine/texture dependent on its electrons only? If electrons are same then why are there so many different colors?

when we look at an object be it a metal or a non-metal are we looking at its electrons only, so then if all electrons are same then why do different chemicals or elements or objects have different ...
0
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0answers
59 views

How do I use the direction of a cross product?

The question is: An electron is projected at a speed of $3.70×10^6\text{ m/s}$ in the $u=\frac{(i+j+k)}{\sqrt3}$ direction into a uniform magnetic field $\vec {B} = 6.43 i + 3.43 j −8.29 k$. ...
2
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1answer
69 views

Why is a Electron negative not both?

I was pondering on the question of magnetic dipoles but then I had an thought that electron and other particles are either positive or negative or have no magnetic charge but then I thought of ...
0
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0answers
29 views

Confused about SI and CGS Units For E/M Energy

I've been looking at some papers on wakefields of electron beams and I am a little confuded about the units. They do not specify whether or not they are in cgs or SI units. Here is a sample equation: ...
0
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0answers
18 views

Understanding What A Wakefield Describes?

I am trying to understand the some of the properties of wakefields, namely the energy change. So, as a preface I am interested in primarily the wakefield due to electron beams as they progress through ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Why photoelectron imaging is a 'complete' measurement?

In many articles and books, it says that photoelectron imaging gives a 'complete' information. What is mean by 'complete' measurement or a 'complete' information? Through photoelectron imaging ...
25
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5answers
3k views

Do electrons have shape?

According to the Wikipedia page on the electron: The electron has no known substructure. Hence, it is defined or assumed to be a point particle with a point charge and no spatial extent. Does ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

What would be physics of a star totally consisting of electrons? [duplicate]

What is the minimum radius and mass (if any) for such a structure to be stable? What is the ultimate future of such structure? Will the electron repellation always be stronger than any gravitational ...
2
votes
3answers
139 views

How do electrons actually move in a circuit?

Last year, we were taught about electricity, about how electrons in a closed circuit. But as our teacher had not taught us about electric fields yet, she gave us a simplified model of motion of ...
0
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1answer
28 views

Charge density of turning object

A charged disk or sphere will create currents around its turning axis if a rotation is added. The total current can then be calculated by adding all concentric currents together. Every current (I take ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Origin of Overpotential in Electrochemical Cell

I'm well aware of the significance of overpotential and how it is defined to be the difference between the thermodynamically determined equilibrium potential and the experimental potential required to ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

What happens when work function = hf

What happens when the photon which hits a metal surface has energy equal to the work function of that surface? $$\phi = hf$$ I realise the emitted electron will have no kinetic energy after escape, ...
1
vote
2answers
180 views

What's the outcome of two polarized electrons beam collide head on?

Let's say that I have two electron beams targeted towards each other along x-axis. Both beams are polarized on axis (z-axis) perpendicular to x-axis. Another beam's polarization is up and another down ...