Negatively charged particle with spin 1/2. A component of mundane terrestrial matter, and part of all neutral atoms and molecules. It has a mass about 1/1800 that of a proton. Its antiparticle is the positron.

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What evidence is there for quantum leaps?

I find this very strange that an electron can 'teleport' from one energy level to another. So what evidence suggests this?
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383 views

How much energy is needed to create an electron?

I know how to calculate the electrostatic energy of a sphere (it has a well defined radius). But how can I calculate the electrostatic energy of an electron as it is a point particle? By electrostatic ...
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32 views

Why do electron and hole mobilities decrease with temperature?

From page 35 of "Microelectronics" by Millman Grabel Mobility $\mu$ decreases with temperature because more carriers are present and these carriers are more energetic at higher temperatures. ...
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36 views

electron-gas theory of a metal (drude model) - intuition

I'm back to studying "Microelectronics" by Millman & Grabel (2nd ed.). The book makes some references to the electron-gas theory, and I found out to have some problems with my intuition. At each ...
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37 views

Can photons travel through space independent of time?

I read an article about advanced photons and they stated that photons traveled back in time to hit an electron. Can photons really travel back in time and if so, how?
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1answer
74 views

Is the electromagnetic mass real?

In his Lectures on Physics vol II Ch.28-2 Feynman calculates the field momentum of a moving charged sphere with charge $q$, radius $a$ and velocity $\mathbf{v}$. He finds that the total momentum in ...
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1answer
22 views

Is it possible for the phase of electric charge to change over large general relativistic distances?

Jackson provides examples of how magnetic charge and electric charge form together to create complex charge, \begin{align} \rho = \rho_e+i\rho_m \end{align} which gives rise to the complex faraday ...
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101 views

What specifically is incorrect about the Dirac Sea interpretation?

So taking the square root of $E^2 = (m_oc^2)^2 + p^2c^2$ yields two solutions. The Dirac Sea treats the negative solution as an infinite space of electrons with negative energy. All the observable ...
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22 views

Density functional theory and partial charge transfer

When density functional theory is used to simulate a molecule adsorbed on a surface, it turns out that due to their interaction, a fraction of an electron is transferred from the surface to the ...
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1answer
34 views

Is electron interference because of energy transformation from wave to particle and vice versa?

I read about electron interference that in presence of photons there are no fringes formed but in its absence fringe patterns are formed. Can it be explained like this. An electron travels free as a ...
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13 views

Does illuminating a conductor with light energy less than its workfunction change the measured conductivity?

For example, does the light absorbed in an exposed metal wire increase the average velocity of the electrons, hence increasing mobility and conductance?
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1answer
80 views

Why can't the electron enter the nucleus?

Actually, there exists an attractive force between an electron and the protons inside the nucleus, but the electron cannot be attracted towards the nucleus! What force balances that attractive force? ...
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1answer
66 views

In how many possible ways can a photon be emitted?

I am currently studying atomic physics, and I encountered the question above. I am posting this question because I can't afford to move on with even the tiniest bit of uncertainty in my understanding ...
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Do we really not know why atoms 'decide' to produce a photon?

I was watching the Cosmos documentary where Neil deGrasse Tyson explained how certain energy photons get absorbed by an atom, which causes the electrons of that atom to climb into a higher energy ...
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1answer
27 views

Tape as a X-Ray Source

A couple years ago I ran upon a YouTube video demonstrating how researchers used x-rays given off by tearing tape off its spindle in hopes to miniaturized and cheapen future x-ray devices. As of ...
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0answers
38 views

How does an electron manage to constantly revolve around the nucleus of an atom forever? [duplicate]

When an electron revolves around the nucleus of an atom is it using any energy in doing so. If so, where does this energy come from and how does it be a constant source (the electron revolves ...
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1answer
25 views

Mean-free-time between collisions and drift-velocity

In a physics text book I need help to make sense of the part highlighted in yellow: This is out of context of course, so just to make it clearer: $\tau$ is the mean free time of the electrons in a ...
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1answer
119 views

How did we come to know that electrons actually 'move' in an atom?

Rutherford's experiments confirmed the existence of light-weight electron clouds in a mostly empty atom, and that they occupy some space around the nucleus. What made us conclude that they can move? ...
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12 views

Dispersion of electrons in conductive medium

Say you have a 1'x 1'x 1' cube of conductive metal. If you placed an electrode on the center of one of the sides, and quickly turned it on and off, how would the electrons disperse? Both initially ...
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47 views

What happens to a photon sent to an atom has no electrons?

Suppose that there is an atom has no electrons. If we sent a photon to this atom, what would happen? Reflected or absorbed?
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1answer
53 views

Electron scattering to measure the nuclear radius

I have been taught that you can find out the size of a nucleus of an atom by firing electrons at high velocities at the atom. This causing scattering due the positive charge of the nucleus and ...
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75 views

Quantum mechanics,and how the law $ΔxΔp≥ℏ/2$ explains the paradox regarding atoms

In Chapter 2-3,Vol I of the Feynman lectures, Feynman talks about a rule in quantum mechanics that says that one cannot know both where something is and how fast it is moving. That the uncertainty of ...
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1answer
70 views

What happens when an atom absorb electron/photon?

I'll give you a scenario or two, and please tell me what will happen and that shall answer my question. Thanks in advance. Scenario 1: Will an atom absorb an electron with kinetic energy greater ...
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1answer
46 views

Opacity/Transparcy of Conductive Meshes to Charged Particles (Electrons/Ions)

When using a conductive (metal) mesh, effectively a metallic woven fabric, in vacuum applications as a "grid" for charged particle optics, how does one calculate (or at least estimate) the opacity or ...
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28 views

neglect of lattice potential for conduction electrons

Why is it true that in nearly free electron compunds, complete neglect of the lattice potential is usually a good approximation as long as one considers crystal momenta remote from the boundaries of ...
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4answers
93 views

Interpretation of Orbital Magnetic Moment

The wavefunctions for atomic orbitals have always been described to me one of two ways: As a "smeared out" electron standing wave with integer number circumference of de Broglie wavelengths As a ...
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Why is the resolution of an electron microscope on the order of the electron wavelength?

A problem (Problem 1.4) in Zettili's Intro to Quantum Mechanics is: Estimate the energy of the electrons that we need to use in an electron microscope to resolve a separation of 0.27 nm. I was not ...
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85 views

Electrons and Magnetism

Electron at rest generates Electric field. Electron moving without acceleration produces electric and magnetic field. Electron moving with acceleration produces electromagnetic waves. Please explain ...
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1answer
36 views

Electron degeneracy and helium flashes in stars

I have a question regarding the above mentioned. When a star have a mass of about 3-8 it does not go through the so-called helium flash phase, but instead just run along as nothing had happened, turn ...
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120 views

Do electrons pop into and out of existence around the nucleus of an atom?

What surrounds the nucleus is the probability wave. But are the electrons constantly popping in and out of existence around the nucleus in the cloud?
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2answers
507 views

How do electrons get a charge?

Electrons belong to a group of elementary particles called leptons. There are charged and neutral leptons. And electron is the charged one. But how come it got charged? The negative or positive ...
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61 views

Quantum fluctuation

According to the quantum fluctuation concept, a particle and its corresponding antiparticle appear out of nothing only to annihilate and emit some energy in the form of electromagnetic waves. Does ...
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4answers
88 views

Where do free electrons come from?

Here's what I what to know... Atoms have a nucleus that's positively charged and the negative electrons flow around it. Well when you pull the negative electrons off the atom where do the new ...
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2answers
88 views

Is Magnetism and Electromagnetism the Same Thing?

I keep hearing everywhere that magnetism and electromagnetism are different but is seems to me that when a current is moving and it creates a "magnetic field", it is just electrons repulsing other ...
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22 views

Motion of an electron in an Electric Field

I'm having trouble finding the acceleration of an electron which enters a constant electric field. What I know is that the velocity of the electron is $2.5 \times 10^6 \text{ m/s}$ with a mass of ...
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26 views

Is my representation of $\varphi$ Work function correct?

I am a middle-school so my understanding of physics may not be as solid as you professional physicists but never the less thought its worth a try to learn more. I read about photo-electric effect by ...
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1answer
22 views

Why the mobilities of holes and electrons are not identical in an intrinsic material?

In an intrinsic material, the lifetime $\tau$ of electrons and holes is the same, so in the equation for mobility, $$\mu = \frac{e\tau}{m^*}$$ the only difference between mobility of electrons an ...
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1answer
18 views

Do like charges separating by a small distance release a photon?

I believe from earlier physics that an electron moving from higher to a lower potential (e.g. higher energy state to a lower) can release a photon. Given two like charges -- two electrons for example ...
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74 views

What does $m^*>m_e$ imply? (the effective mass of electron is larger than its rest mass)

From what I understand, the concept of effective mass is just something people come up with to make electrons and holes obey the equation of motion $$ \vec{F}=m^* \vec{a} $$ without dealing with the ...
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66 views

What happens to the electrons when metal gets cut or broken?

For example, if I take an iron rod (or thread) and cut it in half, could it happen that one side remains with an extra electron or would it balance out too fast? If possible, do the parts simply ...
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1answer
58 views

How to calculate the speed of electrons in a metal

According to the Sommerfeld model, the electrons on the Fermi level has the relation $$ \epsilon_F=\frac{\hbar^2k_F^2}{2m_e}=\frac{1}{2}m_ev_F^2 $$ i.e. $\hbar k_F=m_ev_F$ with $k_F=(3\pi^2n)^{1/3}$ ...
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1answer
33 views

Does Red shift affect electron waves? [duplicate]

According to the De-Broglie Wave Hypothesis an electron can be considered to be a wave. Red Shift occurs due to the expansion of space(Cosmological red shift), which must expand even on the scale of ...
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505 views

How would the universe be different if the electron mass was twice as large? [closed]

Would the universe even start? Would it collapse or act differently? What if, instead, the mass changed right now? Edit: Since this is too broad lets narrow it to two scenarios: What happens to ...
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1answer
32 views

Difference in electrons excitation in Au (111) between perpendicular and diagonal orientation?

In Au (111) single crystalline as shown in attached file, is there a difference the way electrons are excited when they are excited from perpendicular and diagonal orientation as shown in the figure ...
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2answers
71 views

How is charge expressed?

I am happy with the concept of electrons interacting with each other through the emission and absorption of photons, but what I don't understand is how the negative charge on an electron is expressed ...
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32 views

Do electrons get accelerated or decelerated by the atoms of the anode during X-rays production?

The electrons striking the anode get deflected by the heavy nucleus. Though the speed may or may not change, the direction of motion changes which leads to acceleration. The charged particles emit ...
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107 views

Visualisation of electron

first things first, I'm not by any means a physicist nor a student of physics. I study graphic design. Theme of my bachelor thesis is visualisation of physical and mathematical phenomenons, long story ...
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2answers
68 views

Does positron-electron annihilation preserve enough info to reverse exactly

An electron-positron annihilation can produce a pair of gamma rays. In the reverse process, known as pair production, can the gamma rays carry enough information to determine the resulting ...
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71 views

Speed of electrons in resistors

What affects the speed of electrons in a resistor? If two resistors are connected in series, they both have the same current; same number of electrons passing at a point per second. Suppose one ...
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1answer
122 views

What is the Poynting vector of an electron?

On chapter 27 of "The Feynman Lectures on Physics Volume II: Mainly Electromagnetism and Matter", Richard Feynman says: Finally, in order to really convince you that this theory is obviously nuts, ...