Negatively charged particle with spin 1/2. A component of mundane terrestrial matter, and part of all neutral atoms and molecules. It has a mass about 1/1800 that of a proton. Its antiparticle is the positron.

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Can an atoms energy levels be changed by changing the de Broglie wavelength of electrons?

So an electron can only orbit a nucleus where its wavelength makes a standing wave, leading to discrete energy levels in atoms. But the de Broglie wavelength of an electron = h/mv. So the wavelength ...
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0answers
27 views

What is ultimate AC frequency and phenomena related to it?

Just as in title. What is the top AC frequency physically possible to obtain? And are there (and if yes, what?) phenomena occuring only at large frequencies? I'm thinking about a metallic wire. I know ...
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1answer
26 views

Putting an Electron on a Conducting Sphere [on hold]

What all might go on inside a conducting sphere if I (try to) dump an electron upon it?
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1answer
22 views

What happens when the frequency of light propagating through a solid equals the resonance frequency of the electrons in the atoms?

I was reading this article and the following questions came to my mind: During the propagation of light through a solid, the photons collide with the atom making the electrons vibrate. What happens ...
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1answer
57 views

Is it possible to determine the velocity of electron in its orbit?

I read here that the orbital speed of an electron around a proton can be calculated as: $$\frac{m_ev^2}{r} = F_G+F_E$$ where $F_E$ is the proton-electron electromagnetic force, $F_G$ is the ...
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0answers
12 views

Interaction with the Specimen in Electron Microscope

I read that Electron microscopes throws a high speed electron beam (in vacuum) on the specimen to create a magnified image of the specimen. I wish to know about the interaction of the electrons of the ...
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2answers
28 views

The source and sink phenomenological description of charge - how realistic is it?

I've heard over and over an electron described as a source of the electric field, but that is a misleading term. Source makes one thing of a tap, with a constant flow of something coming out of it. ...
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0answers
29 views

Does the double split experiment set boundaries to the concept of localization?

Feynman's textbook on quantum mechanics starts with the double split experiment for single electrons, see chapter 1-5. The astonishing result is the self-interference of the single electron as long as ...
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1answer
48 views

Along with electrons, do molecules also directly take in photon energy from a source?

Let's take a black object for example. When waves of light (whether from the sun or a lamp) come into contact with the object, is it just the electrons (not the molecules) of the object that directly ...
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1answer
51 views

What is the physical meaning of an electronic system evolving adiabatically through a closed path?

I am trying to understand Physics behind the Weyl Fermion in Condensed Matter Systems. Electrons show Weyl fermionic behaviour in the vicinity of so called 'Diabolical Points' in the band structure. ...
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4answers
124 views

Why does not a battery kept in empty space discharge on its own? If space between the terminals is empty, what prevents the electrons to flow?

Given here is the picture of a twisted battery kept in free space (vacuum). Will the battery discharge quickly? I mean, it should discharge faster than it would if we were to connect the terminals ...
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2answers
141 views

Why don't electrons collide among themselves

The Heisenberg principle states that we cannot ascertain simultaneously the position or momentum of any small particle. However slight, is there a chance that 2 or more electrons from the same or ...
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2answers
31 views

Is the change in orbital of an electron the only way a photon is created [closed]

I would like to know if there are any other ways in which photon's are being emitted other than in the case an electron's orbital around a nucleus changes.
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0answers
7 views

Conductivity of a silicon sample, using electron carrier concentration and electron mobility

Adding impurities can change the conductivity of a silicon crystal. In a particular silicone sample, the electron carrier concentration is 1x16cm^-3, electron mobility is 1400cm^2 V^-1 s^-1. 1) ...
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1answer
25 views

Why does the axle need to be rotated in a turbine generator?

Inside a turbine a wire rotates between the poles of a magnet, i.e. rotating inside the magnetic field, so that the field forces the electrons in the wire to move and generate current. But why does ...
2
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1answer
36 views

Electron Flow Notion

I would like to ask something that bothers me. A lot of us know of the electron flow notion, which it is the technical representation of how the electron charge really flows, starting from the ...
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0answers
16 views

Evidence electrons are fundamental particles [duplicate]

Is there any evidence that entities like electrons and quarks are indivisible, i.e. not composed of other, smaller entities? And have I just made a category error by even asking this question?
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2answers
845 views

Is there experimental verification of the s, p, d, f orbital shapes?

Have there been any experiments performed (or proposed) to prove that the shapes of the s,p,d,f orbitals correspond to our spatial reality as opposed to just being a figment of the mathematics that ...
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2answers
30 views

Is it possible that electron and protons are created after a collision of matter and antimatter?

In a recent show in our country it was depicted that after collision of matter and antimatter electron and protons are created .It's a burning topic in our area now , and I couldn't find satisfiable ...
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3answers
40 views

About the flow of current

Generally it is said that current is due to the flow of electrons; how can we make this claim? I mean, generally we say the atom contains a nucleus which consists protons (positively charged ...
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0answers
21 views

Transperancy of Solids [duplicate]

Why are some solids opaque and others transparent? If electrons are omnipresent in matter then how does light pass through them without colliding?
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2answers
34 views

Would an ordinary or fluorescent lightbulb generate electricity when exposed to light?

I was wondering whether the physic laws or the nature in which lightbulbs are constructed would allow for lightbulb to generate electricity when subjected to strong (intensive and concentrated) ...
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0answers
13 views

How would the fermi energy of an element inside of crystal affect its fermi level?

If I had a substitutional crystal of nickel atoms inside of a copper fcc lattice, how would this affect the Fermi level of the material?
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1answer
24 views

How do phonons affect the work function?

How do phonons affect the work function? Could phonons that are directed towards a single atom, such as in a body-centered cubic crystal, increase the amount of thermal excitation and thus decrease ...
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0answers
39 views

Does quantum chromodynamics imply continuous space? [duplicate]

I am thinking it does. That's because a pillar of quantum chromodynamics is renormalization, which is itself due to the assumption that electrons are point particles (having no extent). A point ...
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1answer
58 views

How would the frequency of particle spin be estimated if it really was rotation?

I understand from reading that particle spin is not real spin as the globe spins. from what I have read particle spin came about because of the magnetic field of a particle. If I understand the text ...
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0answers
43 views

Rate of interaction of free electron with photons from sunlight

How many photons does a free electron (in sunlight say) interact with per second? I did a rough calculation assuming the electron interacts with any photon that enters through an area the size of ...
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1answer
11 views

Will ionization energy be affected by screening effect?

It would be logical to think that the more electrons are ejected from an atom, the harder it is to eject more. I just learned about photoelectric effect experiment. The book is kinda telling me the ...
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1answer
29 views

Effect of charge on electric circuit in free space

Assume I put some electronic device, a laptop for example, in free space. Now add electrons to the object. It will become progressively more negatively charged. At what point will the laptop (or ...
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4answers
52 views

Voltage - Energy drop

I'm having a hard time understanding the nature of voltage and am hoping you guys can help. The main issue is the concept of the voltage drop. Take the following circuits : In regard to the first, ...
2
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3answers
360 views

Is the Higgs field needed to explain the mass of the electron?

The self energy of the electron can be represented in two ways: the energy required to bring a charge distribution from infinity to the size of the electron (assuming it is a point charge with no ...
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1answer
33 views

Can high energy electrons slow down by emitting photons?

When a charged particle is moving with large kinetic energy in the Earth's reference frame, can it emit a photon effectively slowing it down in this frame?
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0answers
24 views

Exact expression for the coefficient in Bloch-Grüneisen (BG) formula?

In most representations of the BG formula, there is a coefficient (usually left vague as an experimental parameter, but sometimes written out "analytically") in front of the integral: $$\rho=\rho_0 +A ...
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0answers
18 views

Fermi Level difference effect on thermionic emission in an open-circuit

The circumstances in which I am asking this: I have two materials, copper and cesium, in which the surface of the two are contacting. The Fermi Energy value for copper is 7.0eV and for cesium it is ...
0
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1answer
17 views

How will open-circuit voltage affect the Fermi Level Difference

The circumstances of my question consists of this: I have two materials, copper and cesium, and they are sandwiched together with a layer of cesium in the middle. It is connected only on a single side ...
2
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1answer
48 views

Reflection of an Electron

When a mechanical wave goes from one material to an other, some fraction of it returns back. Same thing with light (massless), but what happens with an electron? When the "wave function" changes ...
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2answers
106 views

Why are electrons alike but photons not?

Perhaps this is a misconception, but why are electrons alike and photons not? Given two photons, they may differ by having different frequencies (energies). Given two electrons, there are just two ...
2
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1answer
25 views

variation of electrostatic potential on moving radially outwards from the nucleus of an atom

I was wondering how would the electrostatic potential change on moving radially outwards from the nucleus in an atom, considering the effect of the electron clouds around it.
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0answers
52 views

Can pair production be used to explain the EM Drive? [closed]

My understanding of the EM Drive: LOTS of energy and a little light is input into the system. A tiny amount of force is then exerted out of the system. Can this system be explained simply through ...
5
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2answers
77 views

Quantum electron and field interactions

What is the proper way to consider the electric field generated by an electron wavefunction governed by the Schrodinger equation? Can you get a result that would match observation, or is this a ...
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1answer
35 views

Why is Fermi-Dirac type of distribution used in semiconductors?

We assume that distribution of electrons follows Fermi-Dirac distribution / statistics in semiconductor model which will help to find the concentrations of electron and holes and the relationship ...
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0answers
20 views

What makes electrons behave like particles or waves at different times? [duplicate]

I am quite puzzled about the theory that electrons or light often behave as particles and sometimes as waves. So, I wanted to know more about this phenomena and what happens when and why.
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2answers
38 views

Do anodes emit virtual photons representing their positive electrostatic potential?

I understand the electrons in circuit travel down the path of least resistance, however are electrons attracted by the emission of virtual photons emitted by a source with relatively low electron ...
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3answers
260 views

Electron as a standing wave and its stability

1. When it was an era of classical mechanics we used to believe in the Bohr's atomic model. It interpreted electrons as particles (although I couldn't understand how come Bohr who interpreted ...
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0answers
27 views

How does Quantum tunneling conserve energy? [duplicate]

How does Quantum tunneling conserve energy? Take a simple example. An electron in hydrogen leaves the single proton it was bound to and escapes without being excited by and interaction. It tunneled ...
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1answer
59 views

Can a photon excite an electron via the uncertainty principle?

An electron is trapped in an infinite well potential with a width of $\Delta x$. A photon of wavelength $\lambda $ < $\Delta x$ is fired at the electron and misses or rather they don't interact. ...
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0answers
18 views

Is the electron-hole pair a 1D quantum oscillator or 3D oscillator

I'm trying to use fluctuation dissipation theorem to describe spontaneous photon emission process by electron-hole recombination in semiconductor material. I notice that all the references using such ...
-1
votes
1answer
66 views

How can i only shine/shoot one proton/electron per second? [duplicate]

I would like to test out the two slit experiment but only one electron or proton at a time. This question is different from the rest that people are saying are duplicates as I am clearly asking how ...
0
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1answer
33 views

How is it that the voltage wave along a circuit is a tenth of the speed of light?

I have heard that the voltage wave (pushing the electrons) along a circuit is a tenth of the speed of light. Can someone please explain with an illustration how it is possible?
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1answer
89 views

Prove that Laughlin's 3-electron states are a complete set of states

In R. B. Laughlin's 1983 Physical Review B article, Quantized motion of three two-dimensional electrons in a strong magnetic field, Laughlin separates out the center of mass motion of the electrons, ...