The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

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Why the whole wire moves when lorentz force acts?

We know that magnitute of lorentz force is directly proportional to the current in the current carrying wire. But since the force is acting on the charges,shouldn't they get exited or thrown out when ...
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20 views

Gauss's Law for slabs

When you have a slab with thickness $t$ and infinite in other two directions , why $E \cdot A$ (flux) is zero in z direction ( shown in figure ) Problem 57 in the picture
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Why not take in account that magnetic dipole moment of particles is responsible for the magnetic field of accelerated particles?

The magnetic field of permanent magnets is explained by the alignment of the magnetic dipole moments of unpaired electrons (see John Rennie's answer to the question Why is there a magnetic field ...
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1answer
79 views

Can electromagnetic fields be used to deconstruct and reconstruct molecular bonds?

I was thinking one day and came up with a theory after reading about how scientists were studying anti-matter by using electro magnetic fields to separate matter from the anti-matter they made. It got ...
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31 views

solving an electromagnetic problem in the frequency domain

I study a course in electromagnetic fields and I don't understand why when I solve a problem in the frequency domain I lose the transient solution. can anyone show me mathematically why does it ...
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33 views

How it is predicted, that a moving charge has to have a magnetic field?

This question appears after this comment: Even electric charges without intrinsic magnetic dipoles moments produce magnetic fields when they move. My respons: All electric charges (electron, ...
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121 views

Is it possible to eliminate Van der Waals interactions?

I came to know that the friction force actually depends on the surface contact area due to weak interactions (adhesion due to Van der Waals forces) between the atoms of both materials increasing in ...
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4answers
104 views

Do moving charges produce magnetic fields?

As I understand it, a moving charge produces a magnetic field. Now it may be that I have have a misunderstanding here and if so I need to have the proper understanding of this. So if I do have a ...
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1answer
136 views

Ampère's law and superconductors

I have been reading about superconductors and emerge me a inquietude about the explanation of existence of currents inside the superconductor while their magnetic field (inside too) is zero. Based in ...
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4answers
909 views

Do electrostatic fields really obey “action at a distance”?

In an electromagnetic theory class, my professor introduced the concept of "action at a distance in physics". He said that: If two charges are at some very large distance, and if any one of the ...
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2answers
77 views

“X-rays”, “gamma rays”, “sun rays”… But electromagnetic waves are NOT rays and DO NOT consist of rays?

In a separate question I'm struggling to figure out the nature of EM waves. But it's a vast topic and I'm trying to narrow it down to small specific questions. It turns out that all electromagnetic ...
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3answers
53 views

How does an inductor store magnetic energy?

I am trying to figure out what the potential energy of an inductor with a current really means. In a capacitor, the energy stored works like this: if you let the plates attract each other, before ...
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5answers
959 views

How do EM waves propagate?

I have read about this and what I surmise is that when charged particles such as electrons accelerate they produce time-varying electric fields. These E-fields produce H-fields and the process goes ...
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73 views

Is the wobbly rope depiction of a radio wave inherently wrong? And how do vectors of parallel waves align with each other?

I don't have a scientific education, yet I'm scientifically curious. Among other things, I'm struggling to understand the nature of electromagnetic waves. What I have recently realized is that the ...
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1answer
25 views

Field emission vs. electrical breakdown

In vacuum a tungsten needle sits in front of a copper plate at some separation $d$. How does the ratio of the voltage at a fix field emission current (e.g. 1 pA) $V_{fe}(1 \ \text{pA})$ and the ...
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36 views

Is it possible to use electromagnetic waves to power an entire city [on hold]

I have a theory that it's possible to produce a huge amount of electric current through electromagnetic devices placed in four directions (N.S.E.W) with each facing the opposite side and an amplifier ...
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0answers
71 views

Problems with Maxwell density Lagrangian [on hold]

I want to expand the right-hand side of $$\dfrac{1}{4} F_{\mu\nu}F^{\mu\nu} = \dfrac{1}{4}\left(\partial_{\mu}A_{\nu} - \partial_{\nu}A_{\mu}\right)\left(\partial^{\mu}A^{\nu} - ...
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1answer
206 views

Surely force on shell can't be balanced by field momentum?

Imagine a particle with charge $q$ at rest at the origin. It is surrounded by a concentric spherical insulating shell, also at rest, with charge $Q$ and radius $R$. At time $t=0$ I apply a constant ...
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21 views

How can electric and magnetic fields have any component in the direction of propagation of electromagnetic waves?

In case of waveguides we talk about E and H having non zero component in the direction of propagation of wave. But the entire basis of EMW is that E and H are perpendicular to the direction of ...
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50 views

How is light slowing down in a medium thought of in the photon picture? [duplicate]

The speed of light in any medium besides vacuum is smaller than $c$. In a classical way, I just look at that as a wave that propagates less fast, the change in EM-field is passed on slower. How should ...
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47 views

Maxwell said the dimension of charge is $L^3 T^{-2}$ and of mass is $L^3 T^{-2}$, is he right? [on hold]

If his right then, from Lorentz magnetic force, $$F= BQV$$ where $F$ is force, $B$ is magnetic flux density, $Q$ is charge and $V$ is velocity. Therefore, $$M L T^{-2} = B Q V \, .$$ Substituting for ...
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1answer
56 views

Is gravity weak negative electric charge? [duplicate]

This could be true since the both have infinite range and other common properties. They both have fields.
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94 views

Physical distribution of salt anions and cations during electrophoresis

If I have a volume of $L$ liters of salt water at a concentration of $\approx N$ mM NaCl and I pour it into an electrophoretic apparatus (like this one: ). Once we turn the apparatus on, and set the ...
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40 views

Is the proton mass to charge ratio equal to the plank mass? [on hold]

Using a proton charge 1.602*10^-19 coulombs is equal to proton mass 1.673*10^-27 Kg. One coulomb = 1.673*10^-27 Kg divide by 1.602*10^-19 Therefore One coulomb is equal to 1.044*10^-8Kg. Therefore ...
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113 views

Reflection coefficient as a function of frequency

I am trying to relate the equation for reflection coefficient in oblique mediums to the frequency but can't figure out how the frequency affects the reflection of light. $n_1$= intrinsic impedance of ...
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3answers
304 views

Does radiation force depend on group velocity or on phase velocity?

What is the radiation force $F$ due to a beam of photons of power $P$ undergoing perfect reflection? Is it $$a) F = 2 P / c$$ or $$b) F = 2 P / v_g$$ where $v_g$ is the group velocity ? Note that ...
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2answers
442 views

Torque per unit length on infinite rotating charged cylinder

For homework I have the following question, but I am stuck on finding the torque on the cylinder. An infinite cylinder of radius $R$ carries a uniform surface charge $\sigma$. We start rotating the ...
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3answers
7k views

2 ways to generate electromagnetic wave

According to Maxwell's equations, accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. According to Quantum physics, heating causes electromagnetic radiation too. These 2 radiations, are they ...
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1answer
72 views

How can radiation be a transverse wave? Does light really resemble a rope? How can a 3D field be a medium for non-spatial 1D waves? Need mental model

I understand longitudinal waves. For example, I've got a clear mental modal of air waves: a slice of air becomes overcompressed, then the slice next to it becomes overcompressed and the first slice ...
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1answer
20 views

Is internal resistance relevant in motional EMF?

When a conductor passes a magnetic field and connected to a circuit, the induced voltage is calculated via the motional EMF($\epsilon$): $$\epsilon=-vBL$$ Is the conductor's resistance (or internal ...
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2answers
158 views

Current Electricity and E.M.F of a cell

The E.M.F of a cell is the work done in moving a unit positive charge in a loop or from the terminal to the same terminal. The force it experiences is a conservative force. Therefore, the work-done in ...
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1answer
205 views

Why do we always consider the area of inner solenoid while calculating the mutual inductance of two coaxial solenoids?

While we know that flux linked to an area is the dot product of the area vector of the loop(and not the actual area encountering the field lines) and the magnetic field linked to it, why then do we ...
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1answer
78 views

Separating aluminium sheets with magnetic field

all! I would like to know if it would be possible to induce a strong enough magnetic field in sheets of aluminium so they would be separated between each other, like when you use magnets to separate ...
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1answer
154 views

How is Magnetic force on a current carrying conductor $Blb$

I was reading an answer about torque acting on a rectangular current carrying loop kept in a uniform magnitude field B. Force acting on each sides is $F_1$, $F_2$, $F_3$, $F_4$. It's written here : ...
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5answers
581 views

Can you depict the electron's electromagetic field?

I've had a number of discussions with individuals about electromagnetism. A recurring issue concerns the distinction between field and force, and seems to be associated with the lack of unification in ...
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1answer
70 views

Could electromagnetic charge curve something like spacetime in analogy with general relativity? [duplicate]

Newtonian gravity and electrostatics have the same form; this analogy is extended when we look at full dynamic electromagnetism, and correspondingly "gravitomagnetism". We are quite capable of ...
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1answer
107 views

Constant magnetic field attenuation by µ-metal (mu-metal)

I am interested in the magnetic field attenuation by µ-metal. Specifically shielding from earth's magnetic field $\boldsymbol{H}_E$ through closed cylindrical layers of such a metal, yielding an ...
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1answer
165 views

Force of a solenoid on a ferromagnetic material

As I was trying to find an answer to another problem, I was informed that the equation I was using would not work. The equation I was using was $$F = (NI)^2\mu_0\frac{\text{Area}}{2g^2}$$ If this ...
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0answers
26 views

Rotating cone magnetic field [on hold]

how to calculate the magnetic field of a rotating cone with a superficial charge distribution that varies with the altitude? It knows : height of the cone , truncated cone rays bases , there are ...
2
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2answers
129 views

Far Field Diffraction of EM waves: what does the zero frequency signify?

If you have a system of independently radiating electrons/point-charges, the far field distribution of the EM waves can be approximated by the fraunhoffer diffraction integral, or simply by the ...
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0answers
45 views

Question about Elon Musk's Hyperloop Suspension [on hold]

So one of the proposed suspension systems that will be used on the hyperloop include the externally pressurised air cushions. These cushions lift (or atleast help lift) the capsule and reduce drag ...
2
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0answers
2k views

How to calculate magnetic pole strength?

I have 2 magnets. I need to know the force between them. In a previous Phys.SE question, conclusion was: we need to use a dipole-dipole interaction equation, which included m, which the magnetic ...
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3answers
146 views

What is supposition of equilibrium? How do Rayleigh, Jean know the electromagnetic wave in equilibrium behave?

In a cavity of dimension L, the wave must give zero amplitude at the wall, means wave equation has zero amplitude. Why? Answer from hyperphysics "since a non-zero value would dissipate energy and ...
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2answers
104 views

electromagnetic induction and magnetic shielding

In the figure I have a circular conducting wire. Somehow, in the middle circular region I have a magnetic field (this means the magnetic field is shielded in this region and it is possible from what ...
2
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2answers
624 views

Neither Biot-savart nor Ampere Law can solve this problem?

I'm confused about the use of the Ampere's Law and the Biot-Savart Law due the inconvenience of each law. I want to calculate the magnetic field due to current carrying a circular loop over itself, ...
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1answer
157 views

Are magnetic hysteresis losses relevant to alternating currents flowing in a wire?

Say we have an AC in a magnetically lossy material, like iron. Because of iron's relatively high permeability, skin effect will be more pronounced than it is in say, copper, so this iron wire isn't so ...
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1answer
251 views

Symmetries of a Uniform Magnetic Field

Simple question. A system with a uniform electric field everywhere in space has translational invariance in the directions perpendicular to the electric field but no translational invariance parallel ...
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1answer
133 views

How is momentum conserved when a magnet attracts a metal?

Suppose your have any magnetic object and no external force acts upon it, and the object comes near a metal which causes an impulse (think that will happen). However, the magnetic force is internal to ...
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2answers
64 views

Physical meaning of wavelength of a EM Wave

The wavelength of a wave is defined as the spatial separation after which it repeats its shape. It is easy to visualize it for one dimension but if we consider a light wave/EM wave which is ...