The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

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Spin of unpaired electrons on an atom

Consider an atom which has many unpaired electrons in its outer shell, like iron. What is the spin of these electrons? Are they all 'up'? I know that since they are unpaired, they are more ...
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2 level atomic system interacting with Black body radiation. Relaxation time issue

I am studying the transient regime of a 2 level atomic system (N1,N2) interacting with a blackbody radiation from a source at constant temperature Tnr. The initial state of the atomic system is ...
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77 views

Free Electromagnetic field in Lorenz gauge

To get rid of the extra term in the QED Lagrangian we need to redefine the electromagnetic four-vector: $A^{\mu} \rightarrow A^{\mu} - \frac{1}{c} \partial_{\mu} a(x)$ where $a(x)$ is the function ...
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1answer
25 views

Can you create a powerful magnetic field out of confined circulating electrons only?

Would it be possible, regardless of how efficient it was to do something like this, or why you would actually do it, to generate a really powerful magnetic field simply by producing a cycling electric ...
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69 views

What is the sum of the electrons' magnetic moments in a wire?

The electron has a magnetic moment. This magnetic moment will be influenced in a electric field; the magnetic moments will be more or less aligned. During the movement of an electron in a wire under ...
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2answers
22 views

Wouldn't $D = \epsilon E$ mean that a higher permittivity constant gives a higher electric flux? (And what exactly is the displacement field?)

A quote from the Wikipedia page for Permittivity: More electric flux exists in a medium with a low permittivity (per unit charge) because of polarization effects. This makes sense to me. My ...
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1answer
65 views

AC wire radiation

I'm trying to test my recently installed MEEP program for a very simple AC current. I know that for DC current, Ampere's law dictates that the magnetic fields must drop off as 1/r. How does this ...
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1answer
593 views

Proof of equality of the integral and differential form of Maxwell's equation

Just curious, can anyone show how the integral and differential form of Maxwell's equation is equivalent? (While it is conceptually obvious, I am thinking rigorous mathematical proof may be useful in ...
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1answer
25 views

Pulling a bar through a magnetic field

This is a question on magnetic flux and induced voltage. I believe that this problem's answer key is incorrect, and I want to determine whether my opinion is sound. I also want to explore one ...
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4answers
891 views

Why does a faraday cage protect you from high currents?

In an electrostatic case it is clear that that in a space enclosed with a conductor (without charge in it) the electric field is zero. This is often demonstrated in physics shows like on the ...
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10 views

Does ratio of magnetic length to geometric length of a bar magnet always remain the same?

The magnetic length of a bar magnet is nearly 0.84 times that of the geometric length, which looks quite valid. What would happen if I cut the same bar magnet along the transverse axis? Would the new ...
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225 views

Why dimensionality of the Electric Charge varies with the spacetime dimensions?

The point is: We can find via dimensional analysis that the electric charge dimensionality varies with the dimension of space-time. $$[\text{charge}] = eV^{(3-D)/2}$$(You can see below the way I did ...
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47 views
+50

How to calculate the magnitude of the induced emf in self-inductance and mutual inductance cases?

I'm trying to understand transformers and am reading this site: Mutual inductance and basic operation I am a little confused about how to reason about the voltages involved in a transformer. Assume ...
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31 views

Can a(n electro)magnetic field be amplified to overcome the residual strong force between protons-neutrons in a nucleus?

My knowledge of physics is cursory at best, I never studied it in high school but I enjoy reading about it as a layperson, especially the posts here on PSE. I don't understand any of the complex math ...
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2answers
293 views

The Aharonov-Bohm effect is purely classical, right?

Every discussion I've ever seen of the Aharonov-Bohm effect makes a big deal of its being a quantum effect with no classical analogue. But as far as I can tell it is present already at the classical ...
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2answers
223 views

Torque per unit length on infinite rotating charged cylinder

For homework I have the following question, but I am stuck on finding the torque on the cylinder. An infinite cylinder of radius $R$ carries a uniform surface charge $\sigma$. We start rotating the ...
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41 views

What is the most general form for a plane wave?

In the context of electromagnetism, what is the most general form of a plane wave. My suggestion is: $$E=\sum_i{\vec E_ie^{i(\omega t+\vec k \cdot \vec r+\phi_i)}}$$ where $\vec E_i$ are constant ...
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2answers
289 views

Reflected and refracted light have same frequency as that of the incident light frequency. Why?

My text book says- When a monochromatic light is incident on a surface separating two media, the refracted and reflected light both have the same frequency as the incident frequency. Can anyone ...
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1answer
98 views

Right hand solenoid example

I am just studying for my physics final exam. I came across this example and am not satisfied with the answer. My answer is that Z is South and the current would flow from Y to X because of the ...
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1answer
37 views

Is it possible to make an electromagnet w 2 like ends?

HELP! Is it possible to create an electromagnet with one continuous wire with 2 like poles (i.e. both ends either north or south)?. Visualising it with the right hand screw rule for current ...
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3answers
63 views

Power transmission in a circuit

lets say you have a battery and a resistance which form a circuit. The electrons flow through the resistance. How can you visualize the flow of energy? How do you visualize the energy field? I ...
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4answers
245 views

How any material can provide electrostatic and magnetic shielding

Several metallic objects like Iron, Copper etc can provide electrostatic shielding (one should remain inside the car during thunderstorm) and several superconductors like HTS (High Temperature ...
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1answer
222 views

Understanding Poynting's Theorem intuitively

I understand that, broadly speaking, Poynting's theorem is a statement of conservation of energy. Energy density of a volume of current and charge decreases proportionally to work done on charges ...
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2answers
28 views

Is the screen in CRT connected with a positive pole?

I don't understand this passage would you clarify it? "These electrons are then freed (liberated) from the metal and are then picked up by the screen, which is connected to a positive pole called the ...
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2answers
8k views

Why does magnet attract iron but not other metals?

While searching, i found this page: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/stoi/Why-does-a-magnet-attract-iron/articleshow/4298171.cms but it does not have full explanation. So Please tell full ...
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29 views

Gauge invariance and non-commuting second derivatives

I'm currently doing a homework assignment in relativistic quantum mechanics, and one of the problems involves proving the gauge invariance of a particular lagrangian. The problem is really quite ...
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821 views

Mechanism by which electric and magnetic fields interrelate

I read that force due to electric field on some particle in one reference frame can exhibit itself as force due to magnetic field in some other reference frame and that electric and magnetic fields ...
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3answers
52 views

Where is the energy stored in an inductor?

In an inductor, Most text books say that the $(1/2)Li^2$ is stored in the magnetic field. But is there another way to explain this? In a capacitor I understand that all the energy that the battery ...
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2answers
61 views

Electric field 0 everywhere inside Gaussian surface

Gauss's Law shows that the electric field everywhere inside a spherical shell of uniform charge density is $0$. Suppose we have a surface which divides space into two disjoint regions (an interior and ...
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2answers
60 views

Does inducing charge on a grounded conductor do work?

Imagine a grounded conductor as an plane of infinite area. If I bring a charge to a close proximity to the plane, it induces some charge distribution on the conductor. The question is: is any work ...
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19 views

Mie's scattering Theory Problem

Is Mie's theory which describes the scattering of EM wave off sphere , possible to extend to spheroidal ? object or arbitrary shape with finite series expression ? I tried to replace the radial ...
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0answers
20 views

Dipole moment of a specific charge distribution

A negative charge cloud distribute as a ellipsoid and a positive point charge situated at the centre of the ellipsoid.What should be the dipole moment of charge distribution.I mean, if the negative ...
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7answers
17k views

Can magnetic fields be redirected and focused at one point?

I know that magnetic fields can be redirected, but... given a situation where you have static magnetic field over a large area, and you want to quickly change the magnetic field strength. Is it ...
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3answers
237 views

How does one determine whether an object will make an EM wave refract in a qualitative way?

for example, i have a vague notion that the actual answer is that the permittivity and permisivity are different in each different material, so all waves refract at every boundary, but we only call it ...
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384 views

If we have a current $I$ flowing down a wire, why must the net bound current be zero?

Say we are dealing with a wire that has a current $I$ flowing through it, i.e. $I$ is the free current. Why must it then hold that the net bound current, that is, the bound volume current, $J_b$, and ...
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1answer
22 views

Wireless energy flow through earths magnetic field

Seeing that technologies such as that developed by WItricity are based on magnetic fields, is it possible to transfer electricity that way through earths magnetic field?
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658 views

Electric field from conductive to dielectric media

I am interested in the main difference between transitions from electric fields from Conductive to Conductive/ Dielectric to Dielectric and Dielectric/Conductive media. What are the boundary ...
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20 views

Show that the current in a cylindrical conductor is uniformly distributed across it's cross section

Using relevant equations for E and J, show that the current in a steady current I in a cylindrical conductor with uniform conductivity $\sigma$ is uniformly distributed across its cross-section. I ...
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15 views

Is it possible to write the Lorentz oscillator model using Green's functions concepts?

Is it possible to write: $$\lim_{\gamma_j\rightarrow0}Im\left(\frac{1}{\omega_j^2 - \omega^2 - i\omega \gamma_j}\right)$$ which occurs, for example, in the Drude-Lorentz oscillator model for ...
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1answer
137 views

Electromagnetism Boundary condition

The dielectric slab surrounded by air as shown in diagram has permittivity $\epsilon$ different from air and permeability almost same as air. Electric field everywhere within the slab is given to be ...
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1answer
119 views

What are the boundary conditions for EM waves normally incident on the interface between two dielectric media?

An EM wave, amplitude $E_0$, frequency $\omega_0$, is incident upon a material with relative permittivity (dielectric function) $$\varepsilon \left( z \right) = \left\{ \begin{gathered}{\varepsilon ...
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1answer
62 views

How could the effective electric dipole interaction be derived

In some papers (e.g. Bernreuther equation (1.4), The electric dipole moment of the electron) you can find the electric dipole interaction defined as $$L_I=-\frac i2 ...
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2answers
332 views

Why isn't the ISS electrically charged?

If metal moves in a magnetic field it creates a current. So when the ISS (or any other satellite/object) orbits, is it charged such that if you connected a light, in a circuit, it would light up? ...
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2answers
157 views

How are the Lorentz force, Maxwell's third law and Faraday's law of induction clasically related?

Faraday's law of induction can be used in any situation where the magnetic flux is changing through a closed conducting loop. While giving the correct answer, it seems to me that for the following ...
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65 views

magnetic field of a rotating ring magnet

Can the magnetic field of a rotating ring magnet induce current in a conductor? Is there a flux linkage between magnetic field of a rotating ring magnet and a conductor?
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3answers
140 views

Would a rotating magnet emit photons?

If a magnet is rotating, around an axis perpendicular to the axis north-south axis of the magnet (which I assume to be cylindrical symmetrical), in space (so no-gravity/freefall or friction), should ...
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0answers
11 views

What is the transfer function in fft beam propagation for unpolarized light?

What is the transfer function in fft beam propagation for unpolarized light ? How to construct the fft beam propagation ? This is for homework. For coherent light the beam propagation is E(x,z) ...
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3answers
46 views

Doppler shift and special relativity

I have been listening to an audio course on Special Relativity. In the course the teacher repeatedly says that the "laws of physics are equally valid for all uniformly moving frames of reference". ...
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8 views

Biological Signal Extraction Methods

EEG / MEG Back in 1929 Hans Berger recorded the first electrical potential variations in the brain from the scalp. Great advances have been made in this science since discover, with many scientists ...
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69 views

Magnetic Field of a Current Loop using Ampère's Law

A typical exercise while introducing the Biot-Savart Law is to calculate the magnetic field caused by a circular current loop at a point P located in its central axis, as shown in the following ...